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Why is life after death really not possible?

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Itoero    44

I've read she was cryogenically frozen.

Cryogenic freezing is the process of preserving a dead body with liquid nitrogen.

Advocates believe that scientists will one day work out how to warm the bodies up and bring them back to life, by which time doctors might be able to cure cancer and other diseases which are untreatable today.

 

Today I learned :) ...

Cryonics is the low-temperature preservation of people who cannot be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that resuscitation and restoration to full health may be possible in the far future.

The first corpse to be cryopreserved was that of Dr. James Bedford in 1967. As of 2014, about 250 bodies were cryopreserved in the United States, and 1,500 people had made arrangements for cryopreservation after their legal death.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryonics

In physics, cryogenics is the study of the production and behaviour of materials at very low temperatures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryogenics

Cryopreservation or cryoconservation is a process where organelles, cells, tissues, extracellular matrix, organs or any other biological constructs susceptible to damage caused by unregulated chemical kinetics are preserved by cooling to very low temperatures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryopreservation

Even if she is frozen quickly enough, her cells would slowly dehydrate.

How fast does dehydrating goes at -196C ? Edited by Itoero

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Bender    132

I've read she was cryogenically frozen.

Cryogenic freezing is the process of preserving a dead body with liquid nitrogen.

Advocates believe that scientists will one day work out how to warm the bodies up and bring them back to life, by which time doctors might be able to cure cancer and other diseases which are untreatable today.

 

Today I learned :) ...

Cryonics is the low-temperature preservation of people who cannot be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that resuscitation and restoration to full health may be possible in the far future.

The first corpse to be cryopreserved was that of Dr. James Bedford in 1967. As of 2014, about 250 bodies were cryopreserved in the United States, and 1,500 people had made arrangements for cryopreservation after their legal death.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryonics

In physics, cryogenics is the study of the production and behaviour of materials at very low temperatures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryogenics

Cryopreservation or cryoconservation is a process where organelles, cells, tissues, extracellular matrix, organs or any other biological constructs susceptible to damage caused by unregulated chemical kinetics are preserved by cooling to very low temperatures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryopreservation

How fast does dehydrating goes at -196C ?

The first link is of particular interest:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryonics#Preservation_injury

 

It mentions dehydration and damage of cells and connections between cells, which are pretty important in a brain. Chemical fixation appears to alleviate those issues, but it remains unclear whether these chemicals themselves don't make reviving the cells impossible.

 

In short: there is quite a lot of skepticism about existing methods, and I put myself in the camp of the skeptics. She was frozen with a technique that was never proven, and while it it possible that humanity one day invents a proper way of cryopreservation of humans, I expect that the freezing step will be an important part of that future technology.

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Itoero    44

She was frozen with a technique that was never proven, and while it it possible that humanity one day invents a proper way of cryopreservation of humans, I expect that the freezing step will be an important part of that future technology.

I agree.

Trehalose is a ubiquitous molecule that occurs in lower and higher life forms but not in mammals.

Trehalose is synthesized as a stress-responsive factor when cells are exposed to environmental stresses like heat, cold, oxidation, desiccation, and so forth.

Water-bears (Tardigrada), microscopic multicellular organisms, can survive freezing by replacing most of their internal water with the sugar trehalose, preventing it from crystallization that otherwise damages cell membranes.

 

Perhaps Trehalose is the way to go for cryopreservation.

 

edit:In recent years, trehalose has also proved useful in the cryopreservation of sperm and stem cells and in the development of a highly reliable organ preservation solution.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708026/

Edited by Itoero

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nec209    2

It's truly fascinating thinking about it. Before we experienced the life we are living, we weren't bored because we didn't have anything to do for billions of years. So death should be equally insignificant to us. We always yammer about what comes after life, not what came before it.

 

It drives me crazy thinking about how our consciousness is indeed the product of our brains, and that every human has consciousness produced by their brains, and that, theoretically, there will be an infinite amount of humans (really just theoretically).

 

I've always - incorrectly, and I am aware of this incorrectness, but I cannot manage to throw away this thought pattern - thought about how it is that we experience the very life we are experiencing, and not that of our neighbour, of our friend, of the starving African kid - what made that we were supposed to live the life we're living? What makes that I am the conscious entity in Belgium typing this message as we are speaking, and that I can be spared from the African starvation misery? Whereas another entity was meant to undergo that misery?

 

We are oriented in time and space, and what makes that the very person I am lives in the very time and space I am living in right now? I could've "had" the consciousness of a total different person, yet I am experiencing the life of this Belgian medical student. Why? What makes that the conscious entity that is experiencing this life was awarded this most advanced life form, instead of that of a dog, or a mouse? Would it simply not be compatible with those life forms?

 

 

I'm not sure where you going with this post above it sounds like some reincarnation theory. There no stockpiling of consciousness being assigned to living things being bored.

 

And when death the consciousness dies the consciousness does not get assigned to other living thing.

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Function    76

 

I'm not sure where you going with this post above it sounds like some reincarnation theory. There no stockpiling of consciousness being assigned to living things being bored.

 

And when death the consciousness dies the consciousness does not get assigned to other living thing.

 

I must emphasize the necessity of reading my whole post, if you please; I clearly deny any reincarnation theory but describe certain cognitive dissonance coping with the finality of our consciousness and its inherence to our brain.

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nec209    2

 

 

edit:In recent years, trehalose has also proved useful in the cryopreservation of sperm and stem cells and in the development of a highly reliable organ preservation solution.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708026/

 

 

The problem with cryopreservation or cryogenics is the freezing. When they try to freeze the body their is ice crystals this damage the cells, organs and brain so on.

 

They are trying to do research and development into chemicals that do not cause ice crystals!! But have not found any chemicals yet.

 

May be in 10 to 15 years from now they may find chemicals that may not cause ice crystals when freezing.

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