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  2. I think you've watched him enough, Tucker said it, he indicated the Navy said it but his veracity is always in question. I'd actually like to see the Navy report before I would accept it as anything but sensationalism on Tuck's part... The time stamps I provided should have been spot on...
  3. And I want to know where someone said that, because my recollection is that it was the analyst’s take. Not a retelling of the navy’s position. And I’m nauseated enough having to listen to Tucker Carlson once.
  4. “If the solar industry had to supply all of it” implies your analysis is based on 100% solar. Which is a ludicrous position. And? Is anyone suggesting otherwise? You don’t need 1000 coal or gas plants if 500 will cover the load. So you don’t have the same capital costs. No, it’s not like that. You said yourself that the plants are being used, so it’s a pretty bad analogy. Renewable energy is cheaper in many, many cases. That’s not politics. Overall cost of electricity in the US doesn’t seem to have been negatively impacted. 2013-2018 it went up ~5% https://www.statista.com/statistics/183700/us-average-retail-electricity-price-since-1990/ 5% is lower than inflation, so in terms of buying power, the cost went down http://www.in2013dollars.com/2013-dollars-in-2018?amount=100
  5. Today
  6. I cannot. Thanks for the reply. That certainly sounds like what it should be like...but I guess it is unlikely in this particular political climate. (the climate that needs to change...)
  7. I meant an ocean desert. I imagined that people would get that, but I guess there's always one who needs it spelt out. https://www.sciencealert.com/in-the-heart-of-the-ocean-lies-a-desert-and-scientists-just-found-what-lives-in-it
  8. True! Your answer inspired me to read more and to slightly modify the original question into: Is evolution chaotic? Or, is there evidence that it prediction is impossible to model? Result: I found an interesting paper* discussing OPs questions. (bold by me) That seems to support prediction is not likely possible. But then: I wonder if the example provided by @Moontanman falls into the second category? Predictability is increased and possible due to the strong forces from fishing. *) More at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5958977/#__ffn_sectitle. Plenty of references are listed, and as far as I can see all of them are available online, but some may be behind paywall. I do not possess the knowledge to evaluate the rigidity or correctness of the paper but it contains lots of interesting aspects and discussion connected to OPs question. I recommend taking a look at it.
  9. Somewhere is "technically a desert" if it doesn't rain or snow much. Nothing to do with nutrients. "Why aren't the oceans covered in floating seaweed?" Much of it is, but they are rather small. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoplankton#/media/File:Plankton_satellite_image.jpg from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoplankton
  10. I believe that people can, and do, achieve all those things. It's called "driving". It's important to recall that a self driving car doesn't need to be perfect- it needs to be better than a (typical) human. The most interesting issue (to me) is a moral one. You need to persuade people to buy a car which will be programmed to kill them in certain circumstances. Another interesting issue (already raised) if it goes wrong, who is responsible? The driver? The manufacturer? The programmer?
  11. Rubbish. I said no such thing. The point is that if you want to guarantee electricity supplies, it's academic if some countries get "most" of their energy from renewables. They still have to cater for the times when the sun's not shining and wind's not blowing. So they need the generating capacity to cover it. You have the same capital cost, whether you are using the equipment or not. So the country has to finance two lots of generating capacity, the renewable and the fossil or nuclear. It's like owning a Rolls Royce, and never using it. It's dead money and it still needs maintenance. All to cover the current shortcomings of renewables. I understand why governments still push renewables. There are votes in it, if they are seen to be "green", and it's a very good policy to diversify where your energy is coming from, to cover unexpected international energy supply problems. I wouldn't like Britain to be too reliant on Russian oil or American gas. I'm simply pointing out that the economics of renewables are generally being misrepresented, by viewing them in isolation. To the price of every unit of renewable electricity, you should be adding the true cost of covering it for blank periods.
  12. I did make that clear in a previous post.
  13. The navy didn’t say that, the guest did, and yes, it’s different. Defying the laws of physics is not merely beyond our capabilities.
  14. I was paraphrasing, I think we can assume that beyond our understanding of physics would be beyond our capabilities? 00:10 to 00:30 beyond our understanding of physics. 01:45 to 01:55 Defying the known laws of physics.
  15. An actual driver can’t be watching all those things, either. Why couldn’t you have multiple cameras and a VR helmet? The remote driver turns their head, and the view changes accordingly. I don’t think that’s the problem. The problem is latency. Buffering has already been pointed out, but signal delay is the real killer (literally) How long does it take for the signal to reach the remote driver? The minimum latency is 2x that, and it gets subtracted from the response time. In some ways, it will be like every remote driver is driving drunk.
  16. Below the radar ,but with reassurances that steps are being taken to protact the democratic process. To date this reassurance seems to be missing .Can you reassure me?
  17. Do you not know what you claimed? There’s a written record. You said the navy is “now admitting these sightings are of objects that at least appear to be beyond the capabilities of our technology.”
  18. What do you think it would look like?
  19. 00:10 to 03:30? I'm not sure what you are asking for, what did I claim that you do not see in the video?
  20. A self-driving car is totally different. It has a camera on top that is spinning around watching everything, ALL the time. A person remotely controlling the car cannot possibly be watching all around the car, and integrating: inertial navigation, GPS, radar, video, and lasers. Is there really a car that can be remotely operated? If so, it would be using one camera, or several? I don't think it will be as safe as a self-driving car. Is there a way to have a human participate in navigation? "Each [self-driving] car is equipped with an inertial navigation system, GPS, radar, video, and laser rangefinders. The vehicle leverages information gleaned from the inertial navigation system — a device that accumulates errors over time — and the GPS to determine where it is located and then uses the sensor data to further refine its position. From these data inputs, the car builds a three-dimensional image of where it is located." https://www.dummies.com/consumer-electronics/how-does-a-self-driving-car-work/ I don't believe a human can do all those things at once.
  21. 1. This is based on the false premise that solar is all or nothing. Your questionable claim about being “hugely expensive” is moot, in addition to being unsupported. 2. There are countries that already generate most of their energy from renewables, 3. That’s not what “subsidy” means 4. This has nothing to do with growing food under solar panels
  22. "do not overdo it with alcohol because you will have a hangover"..
  23. You're leading me down a tunnel with this, but if I had to pick one, my right to be alive; is more important than your right to kill me.
  24. This is a standard dilution problem. You have to show your attempt at solving the problem first.
  25. What do you know about using Beer's law? I have a feeling that you will only be able to obtain an approximate answer, but it is better than nothing.
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