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AbstractDreamer

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About AbstractDreamer

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  1. Here's a cool paper on X-ray anisotropies found within the universe, albeit with unidentified causes. https://arxiv.org/pdf/2004.03305.pdf If space expansion is anisotropic, then the distance coordinate axes are not uniform at all scales.
  2. I'm still none the clearer. The two energy states is like a coin its either heads or tails for the electron. I get that. If you have something that checks for heads, you don't have to check for a tail. But you still need to check the coin. The position of a photon is not like a two sided coin. Its like a millions coins, and only one of them is heads. You can check 999,999 of them and find tails. You don't have to check the last one.
  3. The confusion for me is that I can't see the similarity of position state of a photon with say electron spin. The spin of an electron is a property of the electron, I can't see a how you can measure this property without probing the electron. The position of photon is a little different. I can measure an area to the left and an area to the right, and if its not there, its position must be in the middle. I can deduce and obtain the value of this property by NOT probing the photon. What am I not understanding?
  4. Edit my above post... A quantum curve when divided into infinitesimal portions, will deliver a single quanta where the X and Y values are in super position. You cannot be simultaneously certain of both the X and Y values. Therefore, it cannot be flat!
  5. A curve must be continuous if you want to use calculus and all the useful and accurate predictions it can make, but why must it not be granular? Going back to small things cause big things. If there is a principle of bigwards, then it would suggest that quantum mechanics "causes" GR, and not vice versa. Perhaps, one reason why they havent been reconciled is the mathematics of GR is entirely founded upon a continuous functions and continuous manifolds, and (I'm guessing here) QM isnt entirely (though i am looking up Lagrangian). The fundamental theorem of calculus is real-valued continuous functions. Surely it has complications if the function is discrete or made of quanta. Perhaps that is the problem... if you take infinitesimal portions of a quantum curve deltaY/deltaX, why should it be flat? Correct me if I'm wrong, a quantum universe suggests at infinitesimal size, you get a quanta that has a curved property. A big curve is made of infinitesimally small curves each with a unique curve value. If there is a principle of bigwards, it would suggest granular should explain continuity.
  6. So I was out running again. Sometime during the run, I discovered my heartrate monitor had fallen off my chest strap. Now I knew when I had last checked it, and this meant it must have fallen off on one of three paths I had run up. So I went back and searched two of paths for it, and didn't find anything. At this point I knew it was on the third path. At this point it also occurred to me that I had measured the position of my heartrate monitor without actually making a measurement or an observation of it. Now here's the giant leap of faith to some relevance. Had I known its momentum before hand, I would have information on both its momentum and position at the same time. Had it been a quantum particle, I would have the avoided the problem of the Observer Effect - by deducing the value of the observable, by measuring all the states that it is not in except one and finding nothing, instead of making a direct measurement of the state it is in. Clearly the Uncertainty Principle remains inviolable. But if quantum mechanics assigns observables as operators and values as eigenvalues of the operator, how does it model unobserved values or rather values for a operator that remains unobserved? Now leaping over the fence, how might this unobserved measurement be involved when considering entanglement, and "action at a distance". Does the unobserved measurement of a quantum state of an entangled particle still collapse the waveform simply by deducing information without measurement? PS. I did find my heartrate monitor, and yes it was on the third path.
  7. But if the curve is a quantum curve, wouldn't the smooth manifold of Reimannian geometry be an unsuitable model?
  8. Well unfortunately for me, I have tried to "truly" learn some physics previously, but I came across unscalable walls and bottomless pits. The biggest obstacle for me was the mathematics. I simply don't understand them. I can follow instructions. I can find the area bounded by two hyperbolic functions. I can follow matrix calculus operations. But I can't understand them. They have no "meaning". There are mathematical techniques and tricks that are used that I can accept are true, but I cannot logically comprehend them and cannot apply logical proof to the equations once they are added. In addition I have questions about the legitimate use of some mathematics. There are some assumptions that are taken for granted, or at least rarely mentioned, but these assumptions underlay ALL the conclusions that are drawn from the results the mathematics give. Just for example, off the top of my head, integration relies on a coordinate system that is "uniform", that is the gap between integers are consistent, but what if it isnt? That throws integration out of the window. Any integration with respect to Time from zero to infinity, assumes that it is uniform and consistent from the beginning and forever What evidence do we have this is so? Sure you can calculate the area under a curve...but only if you assume your axes are consistent and uniform. What if the gap between 2 and 3 was larger than the gap between 1 and 2, such that 1 +2 =/= 3? We already know space expands, that is, the axes are stretched. Are they stretched evenly everywhere at the same time? Do two volumes of space mutually exclusive from each other's observable universe and future universe stretch at the same rate? How does space expansion reconcile with an isotropic universe? The second biggest obstacle for me was the scope. If you want to "truly" know one thing, you have to know ten other things first, the rabbit hole never ends. I am truly awestruck by how vast the scope of physics is. It is like running up a mountain of infinite size, and everytime you summit a local maxima, there's ten more summits behind. The third problem was time and attention. I don't have the time or the attention or even the ability to learn all the things I need to know to answer my own questions. The bottom line is, I am resigned to forever never truly understanding anything, and forever asking questions like a child.
  9. My opinion has no valid basis at all. I was reading another topic when the thought popped into my head, but now I realise the terms I use are rather ambiguous and poorly explained. But I guess they were vague enough to make more learned minds think a bit. I think my use of stars, atoms and quantum particles misses something I couldnt quite formulate into words. What does bigwards even mean? If something disperses, it would have a bigger volume, surface area etc, but smaller density - both bigwards and smallwards. The chicken and the egg things brings to my mind the problem about space expansion and dark energy. Does dark energy cause space expansion, or does space expansion cause dark energy, or are they equivalent like mass and energy? Is a black hole considered a singular, indivisible object such that Hawking radiation is emitted from "the entirely of the black hole" rather than a point close to its event horizon? Of course large things can make small things to happen. A big star can emit a photon. A big whale can displace water molecules. But I think the "cause" I'm referring to is "reason" or "explanation" or "why" something happens. Why the proton is emitted - what physics, or why the water molecules are displaced. This WHY or CAUSE is explained by understanding something on a smaller scale and not (AFAIK) on the bigger scale. The particle emitted from the black hole is the effect, but the CAUSE is hawking radiation, NOT the black hole. Another effect is the decay of the black hole. The direction of cause is bigwards!
  10. Well the formation of, for example, gold atoms requires high energy, and while a "large" cause such as a neutron star collision provides the energy, it is fundamentally still the physical laws that govern subatomic particles of protons, neutrons, and electrons ( + high energy) that creates the gold atom. Its not so much the physical laws that explain a neutron star collision that creates the gold atom. GR will explain how two neutron stars collide, but im not sure how much it helps with describing how gold is formed with a bunch of neurons, protons and electrons.
  11. Why is it apparent that small things determine how big things work and not vice versa? Why is cause and effect noncommutative with respect to "size". In the sense that CAUSE is due to some physical laws: Quantum fluctuations CAUSE real and virtual particles. Real particles cause leptons, quarks, bosons. Leptons and quarks cause protons, neutrons and electrons. Protons neutrons electrons cause hydrogen helium and carbon atoms. Hydrogen, iron and oxygen cause stars, planets, and water. Stars, planets and water cause galaxies, solar systems, and oceans. Galaxies do not cause stars. Stars do not cause hydrogen. Hydrogen does not cause protons. Protons do not cause quarks. Quarks do not cause real particles. Real particles do not cause quantum fluctuations. The direction of time is forwards? The direction of cause is bigwards?
  12. Well let's see. From what I understand, EM radiation is affected by curvature. So in this sense, massless EM radiation experiences spacetime. But is it possible it is only affected by how it is observed by massive things? That is, although it is massless, it has properties that "only belong" in the massive universe. For example, its velocity is a constant determined by local curvature in the massive universe, but if it is not a valid frame of reference in itself then velocity is an invalid property of anything existing in the massless universe. So velocity is a property that only "makes sense" or "takes on a value" in the massive universe. So while EM radiation seems to effect a change in velocity due to curvature, it's not actually a property belonging to the radiation, and therefore no "experience". Now consider its wavelength. If space, volume, distance, length and time are all part of the same continuum, then is waveLENGTH a massive property too? What properties of a photon actually define what it is in its own universe? Lets say there is a "red" wavelength photon and a "blue" wavelength photon, both with the massive property of c. If we removed spacetime physics, then c would not make sense, and so would "red" and "blue". So what is there left to differentiate the two photons? What is left of the universe without space time? There must be SOMETHING left! This "experience" of time I'm referring to is really about leading to whether the existence of time (and spacetime) is a prerequisite for masslessness. If two bosons have values in the higgs field and then occupy the same quantum state of position, how do they retain their original higgs values when they separate? What relevance or significance does space, position and location have for bosons? So if we removed all massive things from universe, do the physics of spacetime have any relevance? If we removed or changed the physics of spacetime, would that affect the nature of any massless things? I would argue, a universe absent of spacetime requires that anything that might exist within it may have a value for size or for time but that such values are redundant and just meaningless information. If the presence of spacetime gives meaning to space and time values, then the absence of spacetime removes that meaning. Zero size and zero time has meaning and meaning requires presence. I think perhaps I should have started this thread in the quantum fields topic. GR describes spacetime and gravity through relationships between how things interact on a macro scale. I wanted to explore how the universe presents to massless things. Is spacetime a prerequisite for massive or massless things to exist? Do massless things have any non-spacetime properties? Do massive bosons have a gravitation effect? If spacetime is a continuum and gravity curves spacetime, why is spacetimegravity not a continuum?
  13. Much appreciated for such direct answers! I will ponder your information and see what further inconsistencies and contradictions arise in my layman imagination.
  14. So I've been running a lot recently. And running causes the mind to wander, and wonder. Here are some wanderings: Are all quantum observers required to be massive? Can something without mass, cause or contribute to waveform collapse of an another observable? Must all massless things in the universe move at the speed of light, relative to the massive things? Must all things that move in the universe at the speed of light be massless? Do all massive things move at the same speed relative to a massless thing? Do all massive things need space? Do any massless things need space? Do all massive things experience entropy? Do massless things experience entropy? Does time matter to massless things? Do massless things experience spacetime ? Does a massless universe require spacetime? How many dimensions does a massless thing need? EG, a photon has property of wavelength and a frequency, so at least 2 dimensions. Could its "movement" through spacetime be a property of spacetime rather than of itself? That is, if it didn't have the property of c relative to massive things, because massive things didn't exist, would it still have the property of c? That's many questions to roughly the same thoughts that were bugging me as I was running. Ill be running again tomorrow!
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