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  1. I got a major award today (plaque, not a sexy leg-lamp) for my "staunch defense of USNO's interests" in a project I'm working on
    5 points
  2. Legs will evolve to vestigial appendages. :)
    3 points
  3. There is a lunatic fringe to both Left and Right, though. The pictures of leftie antivaxxers in the OP obviously belong to such a fringe. What I meant was that we can all chalk up left and right nutcases till the cows come home, but on its own that means little. I suppose the point we are all making in the thread, in our different ways, is that something different and sinister is going on today, viz. that loony ideas seem to have migrated from the lunatic fringe to become mainstream in today's US Republican party. It's Hofstadter's "Paranoid Style", but on steroids. Rupert Murdoch is larg
    3 points
  4. Sorry, but I see this as wishful thinking. In reality, sports in general seems to be just another way to pit rivals against each other in a non-lethal way, but only exacerbates the problems with modern humans competing for "fun". We've worked hard so most people don't have to compete for resources, yet the animal in "us" wants the pleasure of crushing "them". The mindset sports encourages in modern, money-oriented settings is similar to modern business practices, and "winning at all costs" takes precedence over "reaching the top together". I don't think sports unite us, just the opposite
    3 points
  5. Thanks, you are right. I was lazy to read it and too sure about my right with a bit of arrogance. I am Sorry. At least now we know.
    2 points
  6. And maybe you should actually read the articles you cite and stop acting like snotty little child when challenged... especially when those articles you're sharing DIRECTLY refute the very the claim you've been making. For convenience, here's the bit I found most relevant from your citation (emphasis mine): You can read more for yourself here: https://kinseyinstitute.org/pdf/Infidelity in hetero couples.pdf
    2 points
  7. 1. Overwhelming support is irrelevant to the biology question - it's a sociological factoid that has zero bearing on any data that may confirm or disconfirm a significant difference in physiological capacity between trans and cis players. Thousands of athletes could support having trained poodles on stilts in the NBA -- that wouldn't be a compelling scientific case for poodle/human parity under the hoop. 2. "Minuscule advantage" assumes facts not in evidence and yet to be determined. It is sophistry. So are emotionally loaded phrases like the snarky "do-gooders." 3. Ther
    2 points
  8. I really wanted to click upvote more than once for that comment, Joigus. While I don't disagree with the many posts lauding teamwork and discipline and camaraderie, I live in a land of many couch potatoes who might do well to find some unity and rewarding discipline in the Using Your Own Legs as Transport Freestyle event. Instead we seem to have a nation of people passively waiting for electric cars, or whatever tech they think will fix everything.
    2 points
  9. Interesting related point in interesting article: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jul/24/tokyo-olympic-sport-displacing-athletes David Goldblatt IOW: I'd rather see more people cycling to work than eating cheetos in front of the TV while they watch the Tour de France.
    2 points
  10. It's one of the things that grinds my gears. Another related one is the media's idea of "balance".Stuff like this "In todays show we will be talking about covid. On one hand, we will talk to Dr Bloggs- a professor of immunology and, by way of balance we will talk to Mr jones whose last job was at the back half of a pantomime horse prior to his sacking for incompetence." And then they give equal weight to the views of the failed horses' arse. (And you can guess which one agrees with the Republicans) It's a deliberate policy to undermine the importance of truth because, a
    2 points
  11. No, you shouldn't stop, I agree. My POV was more that it might be useful to move on to how data might be gathered (this is a biology forum, my keen powers of observation disclosed to me this morning) that would address the question I have yet to see really answered here: if a man transforms into a woman, retaining deep lungs, heavy bones, and more fast-twitch explosive strength, will her new set of capacities be those of a very gifted woman (well and good) or will they be they be off the charts WRT to cis-women? Rather than just having the chat keep derailing as people strive to signal thei
    2 points
  12. But requiring everyone in a venue to wear a mask protects everyone, including me. By wearing it in public, I'm not just protecting myself and possibly others, I'm also encouraging the practice of safety in general. People are more likely to comply if they see others doing it.
    2 points
  13. When people ask me about masks and COVID-19, I am showing them videos captured in slow motion, thermal spectrum, comparison of how much different kinds of masks release aerosols around ill person:
    2 points
  14. Doesn't matter what happened in 1920, and what the intention of segregation was back then. The point is, it works now for the right reasons, simply because in many disciplines men have a clear advantage over women. If you want to ignore this fact then that's your choice. Segregation and classification in the modern era serves a useful purpose, where it allows for more people to compete and be recognised for their performances. That is where the most useful equal opportunity arises. It allows for women to be recognised and respected as equals to their male counter parts and this then should ext
    2 points
  15. While I agree that the fan mentality can lead to grotesque behavior (Red Sox fans flipping cars, soccer hooligans, fans throwing bottles from the bleachers, etc.), and the whole urge to wear a particular color shirt and feel like part of a special group can be retrogressive, I think the problems with professional sports owe a lot to predatory capitalism in general, and the way businesses try to market an "identity" to sell their commodity. In that respect, Rollerball was rather prescient. I think many of us have those moments when we see modern sports and say "FFS, it's just a GAME! I
    2 points
  16. If one analyses UFO reports and close-contact stories, and from the purely story-telling POV, it all sounds very much as humans (bipedal, anthropomorphic) from the future doing the time-warp/FTL thing (or from a parallel dimension) and trying not to leave too much of a fingerprint (so as to avoid big ripples of retrocausal interference). These 'beings' are invariably portrayed in such a way that the number one feature that strikes me is how much they look like moderately-distant relatives that care about us. I wonder if the whole thing is not just a re-edition of the biblical stories
    2 points
  17. Certainly Australia's landscape is unique. Uluru is of such beauty... I know you like docos, as you say. I remember Australia's first Four Billion Years. One of the geographical features that most impressed me was the McDonnell Ranges. Because this mountain system formed so early, erosion has eaten away even the highest mountains. At some point it looks like the skeleton of a gigantic beast. It's one of the most strangely wonderful geological features I've ever seen.
    1 point
  18. One thing that brings us together and unites us is staying on-topic
    1 point
  19. Car washing, and living in states with an "A" in them? Hmm, not so much. It may be called the same thing, but the Chinese and Mexican food in California are very different from the Chinese and Mexican food in either Texas or Florida. We all hate intolerance, and the Swiss. ... at some point over the last 45 years.
    1 point
  20. The following is probably a well known, scientifically based story, about a time when the Earth suffered an almighty blow. It is lengthy, very lengthy, and at the same time detailed, very detailed. I actually followed it by the audio reproduction, which I recommend to others. As I said, very detailed and descriptive, and for an amateur novice such as myself, some of it quite revealing. Hope all take the time to listen and/or read..... https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/04/08/the-day-the-dinosaurs-died?itm_content=footer-recirc The Day the Dinosaurs Died: By D
    1 point
  21. That is NOT my position. My position is that sport is wonderful (I've said so) that sport is a good way to deflect aggression into harmless competition (I said so in my first response) that sport is a healthy outlet for frustration, a great way to build strength, stamina and co-ordination. Sport, particularly team sport, is good training for children to learn rules, co-operation, self-control and how to cope with disappointment. It's a primitive but reliable assessment of adolescent males for their status in a masculine hierarchy (if you must have those) and an even better means of bolste
    1 point
  22. That is a good summary and there is nothing in the paper to suggest anything of that sort and the link provided by op seems to be a random forum post that appears rather incoherent to me. Fundamentally non-neutralizing antibodies can increase protection (as the paper pointed out), which as a whole is a good thing, and from skimming the lit some papers suggest that they may provide more robustness against variants. Moreover, while it is true that ADE relies on non-neutralizing antbodies, it is not that they automatically cause it. The effects seems to be highly dependent on the virus and I
    1 point
  23. OK. Thank you for the reply, though I could have done without the scathing sarcasm. I was interested in your comments and wanted to be sure I understood your thinking. Perhaps I'll take a remedial reading comprehension course.
    1 point
  24. Dogs doesn’t have sweat glands on their tongues just on their feet pads. That is why panting is the main form of loosing heat for them. They are also able to sense the minimally better physical circumstances in front of the fan, which helps to redistribute the exhaled moist and heat from around the dog and help a little the surface evaporation of the feet pads.
    1 point
  25. I didn't know that! Maybe they don't think it's as over as Kenney thinks it is. Speaking of which, US visitors and asylum-seekers, don't count on our infamous socialized health care if you're crossing into Alberta.
    1 point
  26. That’s what we’re stuck with, at the moment. It’s not my insistence, per se. Society either does this, or excludes the triangle from participation. Thank for saving me from having to post this. (and technically I dehumanized all humans, which is kinda the point of the analogy. reduced emotional/ideological baggage)
    1 point
  27. Like I said before, Stellar Nucleosynthesis occurred at the Sun’s core, not on the surface. So unless you and conjurer can think of way to move the gas from surface (photosphere) through dense convective zone and then to the radiative zone to eventually to the star’s core. Each layer of the sun, are hot dense plasma, but each layer below is higher temperature. I don’t see this conjecture from conjurer is going to work.
    1 point
  28. Not to my satisfaction. Certainly, some people do some things better than other people, but there must be a thousand individuals, at any given moment, who have the same degree of proficiency in every imaginable skill-set. Also, in professions more complicated than a sport, the skills are applied in such a variety of ways, in such a variety of tasks, that they're impossible to compare. In sports, it's simpler, because sport is entirely artificial. Being top is about winning. Even so, there is always an element of chance and fallible human judgment in determining "the top" of any hea
    1 point
  29. If I may provide an opinion on just this bit, sport is an outlet for our natural aggression and baser drives. Although humanity is our world's pinnacle intelligence, we remain a primitive, primal species whose only predator is itself. We are driven by that predation to best each other in a continuous and unending struggle to prove we are superior and deserving of survival and our place above all others. Even our solitary efforts in sport, where our only opponent seems to be ourselves, we are driven by our insecurity against the mere appearance of vulnerability in eyes of observes.
    1 point
  30. I don't see much point in trying to keep some sort of Left vs. Right "score" when it comes to nutcase ideas. But I do think there is a phenomenon in modern politics whereby, not just science, but professional expertise in general, is considered suspect in significant parts of the political Right. In the UK we've had it over Brexit: Gove's famous comment that "We've had enough of experts", when various economists pointed out the snags. It is obvious in relation to climate change. And now anti-masks, anti-vaxxers etc. It is particularly depressing that simple medical measures have been tu
    1 point
  31. Yes, it does. The order matters. The claim was "Some sports though have been segregated specifically to ensure Women do have an equal platform." which is past-tense, so what happened in the past is relevant here. That's the historic reason for segregation was not equality of opportunity, and it's not like that system was torn down and then re-instituted. I'm not ignoring that. I'm trying to make sure that we're discussing fact and not fiction. One of the huge (social/political) issues here is that we are stuck in a binary classification for a not-binary reality (biology)
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. Somebody could punch you in the nose, or put a glass of beer in your hand, I guess. But if the universe is a hologram, and we're part of the universe, we're obviously not real, but somebody much bigger, and clever enough to to project a hologram that looks so much bigger from the inside, probably is, but has no motivation to prove it to his holographic creations.
    1 point
  34. I didn't make it. And I'm not using its as a dirty word, in the sense that capitalists have vilified socialism. But I do think it is a fatally flawed economic system, in that its survival depends on growth. Necessary growth on a finite medium means that when the nutrient runs out, the organism dies. An economic system that must necessarily keep growing on a single planet means that it will die when the planet is consumed. Unlike viruses or some plants, it cannot go dormant or store its seeds until more favourable conditions return. And when a planet's been trashed, they won't, anyway. It coul
    1 point
  35. They should be included. The question is "How should they be included?" Without a clear and acceptable answer to that you are setting them up for failure. Profound failure. Failure you will point your finger at. You point out the small numbers of transgenders excelling in female sports. Is your wish that that continue? Rely on continuance of stigma to keep their numbers low? Force them out unless they are willing to alter their bodies, through surgery or drugs? Or is your wish that they gain acceptance, and encourage them to compete in healthy sports?
    1 point
  36. And now I have a company making red Draft Dodger window snakes for the anti-draft movement. They're printed with "Make America Calm Again", and they're filled with shredded voter ballots. Available in Small, Medium, and Yuge.
    1 point
  37. Beyond predatory capitalism, I also fault sports for promoting "fame" culture. Internet influencers, politicians, actors, and sports stars all contribute to a negative and harmful perspective on famous people. Fame means you're above the law, you aren't subject to normal rules of behavior, you get to do and say anything you want, and people have to kiss your ass. Since Charles Barkley finally removed that tired old "be a role model for kids" clause, all this behavior is held up for our children to see as legitimate. If you're popular, it's not really abuse when you make fun of others. If you h
    1 point
  38. The original Rollerball (1975) had an impact on me. A corporate society that removed the good parts of individual accomplishment in favor of the worst parts of team play seemed prophetic to me at the time, just going into college. And over the next 20 years I watched the corporations gain power and pervert the working and middle classes in the US in similar ways. The aspects of human society that truly unite us? We have an extremely rich and nuanced ability to communicate with each other, coupled with the technology to extend that ability virtually everywhere we exist
    1 point
  39. I agree an equal platform in sports should be available to Trans Men and Women as to those held by men and women. If the stake holders agree those divisions are sufficient, there is no place for me to be concerned otherwise. Some sports though have been segregated specifically to ensure Women do have an equal platform. If stake holders are saying those division are not sufficient to maintain equal platforms, its not my place to dismiss their concerns either.
    1 point
  40. Because we are impatient. Would you want to be part of a large program, where your sole purpose was to travel on a spaceship your entire life just to procreate so the next generation and the next and so on... gets to their destination? This is all assuming that any destination is worth the time, investment and commitment to get there in the first place. Sure we can consider pseudo science, to conjure up warp drives and wormholes... to get around the time and distance issues. But based on our "current" known physics, travelling (in person) to even local star systems is nigh on imposs
    1 point
  41. No ,I just had chapter II in mind https://www.coursehero.com/file/p7hr8lu/If-for-instance-a-cloud-is-hovering-over-Trafalgar-Square-then-we-can-determine/ (although I did ,ambitiously have the moving rods of chapter XII as my next preoccupation) But I think @swansontmay have disabused me of the notion that there is some kind of a "proto unit" of spatial distance that I would need to give meaning/reference to the 1 metre rod. https://www.scienceforums.net/topic/125530-einsteins-rods/?do=findComment&comment=1182529 I feel that I see now that distance m
    1 point
  42. Do what, exactly? To what end, then? Can we not proceed with improving the horrid response that’s wedged people against vaccines, masks, and social distancing based purely on political affiliation or “news” source AND strive for continuous improvement of lab safety protocols? Summarized: You seem to me to be focused on the wrong things. Bright shiny object syndrome. Perhaps instead consider focusing on how to stop active disinformation campaigns from splitting us apart as a society and causing millions to act in ways deleterious to our collective health as if this is just a
    1 point
  43. There does seem to be an innate aspect to such fears, and considerable variation between people. I never had much fear of reptiles or arachnids, always had the impression they were pretty shy and not bent on harming people. They seem like allies to our species, for the most part, snuffing pests. I have to wonder to what degree the "creepiness" is culturally learned. A fear of spiders didn't even occur to me until I learned about the poisonous ones and (Zapatos, you may wish to stop reading at this point)(j/k) I had heard about them biting people while they slept. If you're talking
    1 point
  44. Information cannot be created or destroyed; where did the rest of the universe's information come from ? So, not science either. Actually a thread hijack ... And nonsense unless you back it with evidence.
    1 point
  45. Yes, wonderful illustration of patterns emerging from collective behaviour. Taken one by one these starlings seem quite "vulgar" as compared to other, more beautiful, birds. But when they team up to do this in the sky, they truly are a wonder of Nature.
    1 point
  46. Don't expect too much from me... Ethics never was a main topic for me. I would say, as any sensible person, just the risk of giving capital punishment to an innocent should be reason enough to refrain from it. And AFAIK deterrence seldom works. So I think incarceration might be the best solution, in the first place simply because we put somebody away who has proven to be dangerous, in the second place we, i.e. society must attach consequences to people who do not want to play by the rules. However, if a society does not take the chance to rehabilitate the offender, it is not much us
    1 point
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