CharonY

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CharonY last won the day on November 5

CharonY had the most liked content!

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1889 Glorious Leader

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About CharonY

  • Rank
    Biology Expert

Profile Information

  • Location
    somewhere in the Americas.
  • Interests
    Breathing. I enjoy it a lot, when I can.
  • College Major/Degree
    PhD
  • Favorite Area of Science
    Biology/ (post-)genome research
  • Biography
    Labrat turned grantrat.

Recent Profile Visitors

58694 profile views
  1. Youtube channels on science?

    ! Moderator Note I will reiterate swansont's note above, since it was missed. Even though this is in the Lounge, I'm going to request that first-time posters stay away. If you are joining just to advertise your YouTube Channel, your links will be removed. We are not here to advertise for you. IOW, you can link to other peoples' youtube channels. If you're new, we aren't going to bother verifying if there's a question about who owns it. We will just disappear the post
  2. Confusion about salivary amylase and starch

    If you look at the error bars you'll note that the range for each group is fairly large. When folks write "significantly" it refers to a statistical test conducted on the data. In this case the means may looks somewhat different, but the data overlaps to such a degree that a test does not reveal a significance in the difference between the groups.
  3. Native gels are more difficult to run starting from the need of knowing and maintaining charge of the target protein during prep, sensitivity to conformation changes and oligemerization as well as generally lower resolution. So usually you do not do it unless you need it. Moreover, antibodies typically only recognize certain epitopes and denaturing the proteins may actually make them more accessible.
  4. ! Moderator Note Posts discussing a history forum have been split as there is already a thread discussing it.
  5. Confusion about salivary amylase and starch

    It is actually a tad complicated. The Breslin group has shown that a group with higher amylase concentration had lower blood glucose responses. They speculate that this is due an earlier insulin response leading to an attenuated blood sugar increase (The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 142, Issue 5, 1 May 2012, Pages 853–858). Other papers have indicated that lower amylase levels are associated with a number of metabolic syndromes and obesity. Though the mechanisms seem still to be unclear. So the data may support what the MD was saying (though I am not sure whether studies have been conducted specifically on diabetics), but the mechanisms are (to my knowledge) not resolved.
  6. I think it boils down to why a case is heavier rather than just the weight. More importantly is how the content is suspended within the case to minimize impact damage. When dealing with delicate equipment, for example, it is often packed in foam coupled to a suspension system (i.e. shock isolation system). So in that case, a rigid container can be used as the kinetic energy is transferred and (hopefully) absorbed by the suspension system rather than by the outer case itself. That being said, many high-quality cases can be made with lightweight materials, provided it is properly shaped to have a high strength-to-weight ratio. Often, that is the difference between cheap cases and expensive ones, even if both use the same polymer. I realized that I did not remain in the confines of OP. In that above scenario the first answer is unknown as it depends on the material as well as its structure how much impact is delivered to the inside. However, for a number of reasons polymers rather than, e.g. a rigid metal is preferred as they can be designed to transfer less impact but still be reasonably strong. For the second question the real answer is that it depends on the and how cushioning it is installed. What you typically want is the cushioning to sway, not your instrument.
  7. If I may wade in a bit here. Both of you are somewhat correct. RTS,S/AS01 is indeed a vaccine that is toward the end of the development pipeline. It is the only one to pass Phase III and next year it will be rolled out. It is distinctly different than how we consider standard vaccines, which includes efficacy (less than 40%). It is also limited to children and infants (so it could not be used for adults going on vacation, for example). The reason why it is being used at all, is essentially due to the massive risk of malaria, coupled with a complete lack of alternatives. I.e. one could consider it a an emergency vaccine of sorts. Also, it is only available within a pilot project in selected areas in Africa where Phase IV will be conducted.
  8. Yes and no (though maybe I am misunderstanding your point, if so, apologies). There are now plenty of studies that show that even entirely randomized peptides (i.e. random amino acid sequences) can result in enzymatic (i.e. functional) activities. They tend to be weak but it shows that very simple structures are functional. Over time mechanisms such as selection can lead to improved activities, of course.
  9. agreed. Since the topic was.. rather obscure to begin with I am going to lock this thread. ! Moderator Note Going forward, I suggest to give your threads a little bit more thought and perhaps a dash of coherence?
  10. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Misconduct

    Well, yes. It has been pointed out that his behaviour was questionable for a variety of reasons. For most persons that would not have any consequences unless it becomes a pattern and HR is getting involved. And even then it has to be pretty bad, folks typically like to keep that contained. But the point is that he is a public person, with plenty of media presence. Folks in these positions traditionally have to at least project that they are good persons, otherwise their value for mainstream media is limited (think Fred Rogers). This is to various extent true for most celebrities, depending on what they represent. And gossiping about celebrities seems to be an extremely common pastime.
  11. microwave food, perfect cooking and downside

    Actually no, searing does nothing to keep the liquids inside (it is a rather common misconception, even shared among chefs). Searing first or last generally works equally well. However, cooking a steak in the oven at low temp is difficult as it tends to dry out the meat. An alternative is to use an uniform water bath (sous vide) to get the desired effect.
  12. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Misconduct

    I think that is a fair assessment, considering that our society is not really 100% symmetrical when it comes to how genders are perceived. A part of the issues that Tyson is running into is that there are ongoing shifts on what society perceives to be acceptable.
  13. Electoral fraud in NC?

    Instead of voter fraud, which is pretty much an allegation without evidence, there is now growing suspicion that in North Carolina, district 9 there may have been incidences of electoral fraud. That is an allegation that has to be taken more seriously as the damage to the voting process is much higher than individual cases of fraud.
  14. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Misconduct

    Ah, but sexual harassment is a very specific claim and really only applicable to the assistant. Most articles go for the more generic misconduct in this case (and my guess is that others are just careless with wording). Yes absolutely. If you want to see, you ask. I should add that for the most part folks are less troubled by same-gender physical contact, though there are of course massive individual as well as cultural differences in what is considered acceptable. But especially in a professional setting or even out of general politeness touching folks you do not really know aside from social accepted forms (e.g. handshaking) which are specifically there to build rapport, it is frowned up on.
  15. Neil DeGrasse Tyson Misconduct

    I have edited my post above and I do agree that his conduct was poor in this situation. I can kind of understand it, as I do observe such or similar behaviour quite often in conferences, most often conducted by older folks and often by some sort of bigwig or another (though it does not mean that some of the younger folks are not creepy, either). It is honestly more indicative of a change in how we interact with each other if we are frank, it is mostly driven by women who assert their right to be treated as equals and colleagues.