DrmDoc

Today I Learned

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What interesting fact or trivia did you learn today? For example, today I learned that a shamrock and four-leaf clover are not the same. It seems that shamrock describes a three-leaf clover and, as folklore has it, was used by St.Patrick as a religious totem. The four-leaf clover, which is not associated with St.Patrick, owes it's reputation for luck to its rarity. So, do you have something interesting to share?

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Posted (edited)

Folks in China do not routinely eat canines. That is a myth. Rather, this practice is done in only a few small provinces. The equivalent, geographically, of, say, a few small towns in the Appalachian region here in the USA as compared with the entire country. So, for the vast majority, eating dogs is as frowned upon and even appalling to them as it is to most Americans.

 

And the Chinese food we are fed here in most Chinese restaurants bears almost no resemblance to what they eat over there. If a Chinese person came here and was fed, say, General Tso chicken, they would have no idea that it was considered Chinese food. They also would have no idea what we were talking about it we mentioned mu shu pork, pot stickers, or fortune cookies.

Edited by Velocity_Boy
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Today I learned that osteoperosis is a medical condition in which the bones in your back become brittle.

 

 

 

I must admit that this sounds horrible.

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Twisting fibers together to form threads not only makes the thread stronger in thickness, it transfers stress more efficiently since the sides of the thread compresses when the ends are pulled. The average bed sheet has about a million twists of fiber.

 

Source: Why the Wheel is Round by Steven Vogel

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Folks in China do not routinely eat canines. That is a myth. Rather, this practice is done in only a few small provinces. The equivalent, geographically, of, say, a few small towns in the Appalachian region here in the USA as compared with the entire country. So, for the vast majority, eating dogs is as frowned upon and even appalling to them as it is to most Americans.

 

And the Chinese food we are fed here in most Chinese restaurants bears almost no resemblance to what they eat over there. If a Chinese person came here and was fed, say, General Tso chicken, they would have no idea that it was considered Chinese food. They also would have no idea what we were talking about it we mentioned mu shu pork or pot stickers .

 

Actually from what I read moo shu pork does exist in China, though typically different than served in the US, and pot stickers are a very popular dish referred to as jianjiao. Fortune cookies are an example of something that does not actually exist in China or chop suey.

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Posted (edited)

Actually from what I read moo shu pork does exist in China, though typically different than served in the US, and pot stickers are a very popular dish referred to as jianjiao. Fortune cookies are an example of something that does not actually exist in China or chop suey.

Hence my saying the Chinese wouldn't know what you're speaking of if you "mentioned" the words "pot stickers" and not "jianjiao." *Sigh*

Edited by Velocity_Boy
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Posted (edited)

Hence my saying the Chinese wouldn't know what you're speaking of if you "mentioned" the words "pot stickers" and not "jianjiao." *Sigh*

 

So you say that Chinese people do not recognize their dish if you call it the English name? I am pretty sure they must be dumbfounded by "rice" then.

Edited by CharonY
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So you say that Chinese people do not recognize their dish if you call it the English name? I am pretty sure they must be dumbfounded by "rice" then.

 

On a reverse note - I have heard that the Japanese do not refer to the amazingly popular puzzle as Sudoku - the most common name for it is "Missing Number" IN ENGLISH; but to make it saleable in the English-speaking world it was rebranded as Sudoku.

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I am not entirely sure. I was told that sudoko was an abbreviation of what it was originally called (something like "the digits are to remain alone"), and later abbreviated by taking the first syllables. They also refer to it as something like "number position" or maybe it was missing number as you mentioned), but that was because "sudoku" has been trademarked.

 

Chop suey is actually also in a funny situation as many are not entirely sure how to write it in Mandarin. It pretty much originated (most likely) in the US and there are various potential etymologies on which basically no one agrees. From what I heard at some point most (but not all) people kind of agreed on a specific writing, mostly by just copying it from each other. Not that anyone agrees what should go into it, either.

 

Outside of Western countries it is probably referred to as leftovers for the foreigner.

Edited by CharonY
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I am not entirely sure. I was told that sudoko was an abbreviation of what it was originally called (something like "the digits are to remain alone"), and later abbreviated by taking the first syllables. They also refer to it as something like "number position" or maybe it was missing number as you mentioned), but that was because "sudoku" has been trademarked.

 

Chop suey is actually also in a funny situation as many are not entirely sure how to write it in Mandarin. It pretty much originated (most likely) in the US and there are various potential etymologies on which basically no one agrees. From what I heard at some point most (but not all) people kind of agreed on a specific writing, mostly by just copying it from each other. Not that anyone agrees what should go into it, either.

 

Outside of Western countries it is probably referred to as leftovers for the foreiginer.

 

Sounds like Chicken Tikka Masala - which was not only voted and lauded as Britain's favourite food but was more than likely first cooked in Glasgow or Birmingham. But then Indian food and Indian Restaurants in Britain are a complete national institution - and almost entirely run by a particular group / caste (?) / sect (?) of Bangladeshis

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Possible and rather typical for what effectively is fusion food (but less pretentious). Incidentally, food is for me one of the best arguments for immigration.

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Possible and rather typical for what effectively is fusion food (but less pretentious). Incidentally, food is for me one of the best arguments for immigration.

 

I completely agree, and I was just thinking about this the other day.

 

Jordanian and Lebanese immigrants to Mexico blended shawarma style techniques with local ingredients and spices to form a trombo (pork roast and bacon blended and triple chili-spiced, topped with a mound of pineapple rings) and cooked in an upright broiler. Slice off some of the meat and pineapple into a small tortilla, add some finely chopped cilantro, salsa, and raw onion and you have Tacos al Pastor. I would tear down a wall to get these done right by Mexicans from the Middle East.

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Posted (edited)

On a reverse note - I have heard that the Japanese do not refer to the amazingly popular puzzle as Sudoku - the most common name for it is "Missing Number" IN ENGLISH; but to make it saleable in the English-speaking world it was rebranded as Sudoku.

 

My wife is Nisei. And she's a Sudoku goddess!

 

In Japanese it's called "suuji wa dokushin ni kagiru. She pronounces that better than I do. LOL My Japanese is improving, though.

Edited by Velocity_Boy
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Today I learned that they may have created immortality.

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Posted (edited)

Today I learned that they may have created immortality.

 

They who and how? Please, elaborate. As for me, today I learned 28 fascinating facts about the history of cosmetics. Throughout history, a surprising amount used lead as a key component.

Edited by DrmDoc
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Posted (edited)

Today I learned the origin of Jell-O and how it became "America's Favorite Dessert"--it involved a very clever marketing ad that cost $336 in 1904 dollars.

Edited by DrmDoc
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Today I learned that the vultures that sometimes visit Belgium are Griffon vultures that live in France. They have been reintroduced in the massif central in France.

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Today I learned that time dilation is a lie ;)

 

I simply refuse to go down that rabbit hole with JohnLesser again! Either he's trolling or willfully ignorant.

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Today I learned that you are afforded a lot of leeway when people are uncertain whether you're stupid or just an asshole

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Today I learned that you are afforded a lot of leeway when people are uncertain whether you're stupid or just an asshole

Today I learned a new word; leeway.

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Today I learned that you are afforded a lot of leeway when people are uncertain whether you're stupid or just an asshole

 

Indeed, I'm surprised he broached the subject of time dilation again after it was closed. It just a maniacal carousel.

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Indeed, I'm surprised he broached the subject of time dilation again after it was closed. It just a maniacal carousel.

It's Galileo's fault for being stubborn... and correct. They all want to follow in his footsteps and stand like a lofty mountain in the annals of human history.

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It's Galileo's fault for being stubborn... and correct. They all want to follow in his footsteps and stand like a lofty mountain in the annals of human history.

 

Perhaps your right, but this one might have missed a few steps...or maybe he's just missing a little something upstairs. Apologies.

Edited by DrmDoc
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Today I learnt how to solve second order linear non homogeneous differential equations. ;-)

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