iNow

Woodworking: Amateurs, Craftsmen, & In-Between

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That’s badass, Mordred. On the bushes you’re extracting, hooking a chain to them and pulling them out with a truck, tractor, skid loader, or ATV is the way to go. Works well for stumps, too... and is really rewarding / fun. 

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Section is too tight for anything but a come-along tied to a fence grrr

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16 hours ago, Mordred said:

Here is the finished product used a light oak stain with an outdoor gloss protective coat

Very nice project.

Personally I would use electric engine connected to Arduino with some radio transmitter to send information to rotate it left/right from home using remote pilot and have full of water pailful before going outside. Think about it. At least you will have a reason to play with Arduino. You could reuse old bike parts like bicycle chain and sprocket.

 

Edited by Sensei

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Beautiful! Congratulations on a wonderful accomplishment. Your great great grandkids are going to be fighting over who gets it many years from now. :)

Whenever I build something, I write on the bottom when it was made, type of wood, why it was built, or any other interesting details.

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3 minutes ago, zapatos said:

Your great great grandkids are going to be fighting over who gets it many years from now.

One can only hope. Maybe by then they’ll be able to point a replicator ray at it and each have one. :)

4 minutes ago, zapatos said:

I write on the bottom...

What do you use? I put my name and the date underneath w sharpie. 

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16 minutes ago, iNow said:

One can only hope. Maybe by then they’ll be able to point a replicator ray at it and each have one. :)

What do you use? I put my name and the date underneath w sharpie. 

Couldn't you dremel it in? That's really nice. Well done.

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2 hours ago, zapatos said:

Whenever I build something, I write on the bottom when it was made, type of wood, why it was built, or any other interesting details.

Make timelapse video while making it the next time.. ;)

 

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7 hours ago, Sensei said:

Make timelapse video while making it the next time.. ;)

 

Not fully time lapse, but I did take (and post for friends and family) a long set of images from raw wood, through process, to finished product.

9 hours ago, StringJunky said:

Couldn't you dremel it in? That's really nice. Well done.

Thx, mate. Super pleased with how strong and sturdy it came out. Little things like the trunnels holding my blind tenons into the mortises also make me smile. 

One last shot, this one with the leaf extensions in:

 

D02D6B63-D214-41A4-B2C0-07524F0700E2.jpeg

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Excellent work, very well crafted you don't often see those joints used today but they are solid joints that last years.

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5 hours ago, Mordred said:

you don't often see those joints used today but they are solid joints that last years

Thanks. I agree, and that really surprises me. It makes such a huge difference and IMO is well worth the little bit of extra planning/work.

It was important to me to do this right and I pretty quickly decided on this path. I also decided not to use static fasteners when securing the top panel to the base. Instead, I created a channel/groove in the aprons/rails and use Z-shaped clips to connect them. This should allow natural expansion and contraction through the seasons without ripping the wood apart or buckling.

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12 minutes ago, iNow said:

Thanks. I agree, and that really surprises me. It makes such a huge difference and IMO is well worth the little bit of extra planning/work.

It was important to me to do this right and I pretty quickly decided on this path. I also decided not to use static fasteners when securing the top panel to the base. Instead, I created a channel/groove in the aprons/rails and use Z-shaped clips to connect them. This should allow natural expansion and contraction through the seasons without ripping the wood apart or buckling.

It's a good thing that you thought about that because flatsawn will move more than quartersawn,

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4 hours ago, iNow said:

Thanks. I agree, and that really surprises me. It makes such a huge difference and IMO is well worth the little bit of extra planning/work.

It was important to me to do this right and I pretty quickly decided on this path. I also decided not to use static fasteners when securing the top panel to the base. Instead, I created a channel/groove in the aprons/rails and use Z-shaped clips to connect them. This should allow natural expansion and contraction through the seasons without ripping the wood apart or buckling.

 Several reasons for that, many are due to most ppl want removable legs for moving and storage purposes. The second being many ppl look for the easier and quick put together methods even to the point of sacrificing solidity.

 Still if you can do that joint the dovetail shouldn't present much more challenge and dado joints are always easy.

Edited by Mordred

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Holy crap. Apparently I REALLY need to up my game! 

I built a cool table for our patio using cedar 4x4s joined by halflap joints with mitered angles.

Tried to upload an image, but have hit my limit it seems. Came out nicely.

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