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Lara

Sudden appearance of small blue dots in my vision

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I started getting the "Blue Dots" or "Blue Sparks" in 1994. They would startle me at first. I thought maybe it was from using the computer and messing up my vision.  Thru the years, I have also seen Red Dots. And occasionally purple, yellow dots. But they are mostly Blue or Red.
I'm wondering what they are. Not many people have this visual defect. These are like small spark-like dots. They last a few seconds then fade away. They stay in one area and disappear. They are not floaters. They don't follow your eye movement like floaters do.
I still get them. What are these?

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I have had the blue dots appear, looking just like the little blue led on my phone that tells me I have a message, and they remain for about a second, and blink out.  They occur with eyes open or closed and sometimes seem to follow thoughts about spiritual matters, so that's what I think they are related to, a metaphysical phenomenon of some sort.  I asked my opthalmologist about them, and he said he saw nothing in my exam to explain something like that.  I've had them for several years now, usually at least once  daily.  If you have ever had visual field testing where blue dots are used that blink on and off, it's a lot like those look.

Edited by janetjanetbobanet

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Over the last few days I have seen a tiny blue dot when my eyes are open, that quickly vanishes. Sounds just like Janet's (above).  

I also see the tiny twirling white dots, millions of them. They're most easily seen when looking at a clear blue sky away from the sun, but can be seen indoors too. I think anyone can see them if they try. You have to focus on open space. I thought they were energy particles unknown to science, but recently I read that they are just your own white blood cells in the blood vessels of the eyes.

I prefer to believe they are mysterious energy.   

  

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I have been experiencing the same symptoms as Lara and a few others have described in this forum for a while now..

I was wondering if it could be related to strong bright levels of light in my vision

Some examples are....staring at my for iPhone screen long periods of time, and having bright, LED lighting at home, ect...

Im assuming and stating the obvious that, us as humans are not designed to stare at bright phone screens, and have strong light levels in our vision.

Is that something that could cause the blue dots and more recently plus rarely ( for me ) cause the white dots to appear????

Edited by wazjames

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1 hour ago, wazjames said:

I have been experiencing the same symptoms as Lara and a few others have described in this forum for a while now..

I was wondering if it could be related to strong bright levels of light in my vision

Some examples are....staring at my for iPhone screen long periods of time, and having bright, LED lighting at home, ect...

Im assuming and stating the obvious that, us as humans are not designed to stare at bright phone screens, and have strong light levels in our vision.

Is that something that could cause the blue dots and more recently plus rarely ( for me ) cause the white dots to appear????

I think this is the phenomenon. There's a simulation on the page - Click link under quote:

Quote

Blue field entoptic phenomenon

The blue field entoptic phenomenon or Scheerer's phenomenon (after the German ophthalmologist Richard Scheerer, who first drew clinical attention to it in 1924[1]) is the appearance of tiny bright dots (nicknamed blue-sky sprites) moving quickly along squiggly lines in the visual field, especially when looking into bright blue light such as the sky.[2] The dots are short-lived, visible for a second or less, and traveling short distances along seemingly random, curvy paths. Some of them follow the same path as predecessors. The dots may be elongated along the path like tiny worms. The speed of the dots varies in sync with the pulse; they briefly accelerate at each heart beat.[3] The dots appear in the central field of view, within 15 degrees from the fixation point.[4] The left and right eye see different dots; someone looking with both eyes sees a mixture.

Most people are able to see this phenomenon in the sky, although it is rather weak, and many people do not notice it until asked to pay attention. The dots are highly conspicuous against a monochromatic blue background (~430 nm) instead of the sky.

Explanation

The dots are white blood cells moving in the capillaries in front of the retina of the eye.[5] Blue light (optimal wavelength: 430 nm) is absorbed by the red blood cells that fill the capillaries. The eye and brain "edit out" the shadow lines of the capillaries, partially by dark adaptation of the photoreceptors lying beneath the capillaries. The white blood cells, which are much rarer than the red ones and do not absorb blue light, create gaps in the blood column, and these gaps appear as bright dots. The gaps are elongated because a spherical white blood cell is too wide for the capillary. Red blood cells pile up behind the white blood cell, showing up like a dark tail.[6] This behavior of the blood cells in the capillaries of the retina has been directly observed in human subjects by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, a real time imaging technique for examining retinal blood flow.[7] The dots will not appear at the very center of the visual field, because there are no blood vessels in the foveal avascular zone

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_field_entoptic_phenomenon

 

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I've seen the bright blue dot many times since I was a child. There was an article about it in a science magazine once explaining it. It's completely harmless and totally normal phenomenon. I don't remember the exact explanation anymore, but it had something to do with how the light-sensing cells of retina and optic nerve work. Something caused retina cells in a certain spot to work differently for a moment - hence the spot remains in the same location in your vision.

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