NPK

Pronunciation of fungi

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Not necessarily, as the "modern" use is often derived from the latinized version of the greek words (and is more common, but not exclusive in taxonomic terms). But even then, isn't the Greek plural not also rhinocerotes? I.e. ῥῑνοκέρωτες ? I only learned Latin, so I am really only guessing (though I am fairly sure of keras-> kerata).

 

Yes, the plural of keras is kerata, but just because the etymology of ῥινόκερως is from rhis and keras, it doesn't follow that the plural is formed from the plural of either of these roots. The singular ῥινόκερως is only found 22 times in Ancient Greek sources, and earliest sources give ῥινοκέρωτα as the plural (neuter). But some later sources (e.g. Strabo 16.4.15.9) give οἱ ῥινοκέρωτες (masculine), so there was no conformity. It looks as if we are both right. :)

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Singular or plural pronounced the same.

 

 

You pronounce fungus and fungi the same way? :eek:

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You pronounce fungus and fungi the same way? :eek:

On a side note, It's peculiar that when something is infected one says "it has a fungus" instead of " it has fungi" when there are likely to be several or many examples present.

Edited by StringJunky

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On a side note, It's peculiar that when something is infected one says "it has a fungus" instead of " it has fungi" when there are likely to be several or many examples present.

 

 

On the other hand, it could be a single fungus - even if it has infected a whole forest...

 

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/strange-but-true-largest-organism-is-fungus/

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In plural fun-gus

In singular fuun-g(h)ee

 

They are Latin pronunciations of them

 

You have them the wrong way round. -us is singular

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really imponderable plurals such as rhinoceros (-> rhinocetera).

Don't know if it's still true, but Micro$oft Publisher used to think the plural of rhinoceros was 'rhinoceroses'.

Found that out when one of my students was searching for flower clipart for a Valentines Day card.

Edited by Manticore

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Don't know if it's still true, but Micro$oft Publisher used to think the plural of rhinoceros was 'rhinoceroses'.

Found that out when one of my students was searching for flower clipart for a Valentines Day card.

 

But that's American. :)

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A mushroom walks into a bar and orders drinks for everyone. Someone asks the bartender why he did it, and the bartender responds "because he is a fun guy".

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A mushroom walks into a bar and orders drinks for everyone. Someone asks the bartender why he did it, and the bartender responds "because he is a fun guy".

 

And this joke doesn't work, because he has to be a fun guss in the singular.

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And this joke doesn't work, because he has to be a fun guss in the singular.

Worked for me. Guess I didn't think about it that hard. :)

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On 2/15/2006 at 1:06 AM, NPK said:

Another word that is pronounced inconsistently.

 

Fun-j-eye ?

 

Fun j (eye) in Standard American English.
"G" followed by "I" is a soft sound (The "J" sound) as in , "giraffe:.

("Fun guy," became popularized because of the jokes about a fun guy.)

(Fungus has the hard G because it is followed by the U as the G in the name Gus.)

I am a mycologist...Someone who studies fungi.Fungi is plural and fungus is singular.

(Some people  use a hard G all the time.  I do not recommend that.)

Edited by JazeWay

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16 hours ago, JazeWay said:

Standard American English.

There is no such thing as "American English".

There is English; and there are mistakes.

OTOH, 

  • "There are multiple pronunciations in current English use. More American dictionaries favor the pronunciation /ˈfʌn.dʒaɪ/ or /ˈfʌŋ.ɡaɪ/, while more British dictionaries favor the pronunciation /ˈfʌŋ.ɡiː/ or /ˈfʌn.dʒiː/. However, all four pronunciations are in use in both countries."
    From
    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fungi#Pronunciation

:)

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