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Evolution of Covid Strains.


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We are (all?) washing our hands etc more and doing so with chemicals we hope will degrade coronavirus.

So would this lead to the demise of less resistant variants and development of those strains that are more resistant ?

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Unlikely. A virus has only limited features that would change their physical properties. Moreover even more complex bacteria do not appear to become resistant to physical disruption in any meaningful way.

 

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55 minutes ago, Janus said:

Washing your hands is more about physically removing the virus from their surface than it is about killing the virus.

so, does this mean that in fact, we did not need to use soap? 

interesting.

if not; how do we remove viruses from the surface of our hands?

addition: I was almost forgetting bacteria.sorry. but the question still stands.

1 hour ago, studiot said:

We are (all?) washing our hands etc more and doing so with chemicals we hope will degrade coronavirus.

may I ask a question: I remember you had said that we would have a probability to face a new diseaase (i.e. pandemic) in a thread.

now turkish media announces a mutated version of covid19?

if this case satisfies your (or proves that you were right in your prediction), how did you reach that information?

Edited by ahmet
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Soap does, in fact, kill COVID 

https://healthmatters.nyp.org/how-does-handwashing-with-soap-kill-the-coronavirus/

and helps remove it from your skin

https://www.uchealth.org/today/why-soap-and-water-work-better-than-hand-sanitizer-to-remove-the-coronavirus/

“Soap disrupts the sticky bond between pathogens and your skin, allowing the pathogens to slide right off. Not only are you neutralizing the virus with the soap, but you’re also physically knocking it off your hands,” Pastula said. “Hand sanitizer doesn’t do all of that.”

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With regard to OP, there are several strains of SARS-CoV-2 and one of them (B.1.1.7) seems to spread significantly throughout southern England, which carries around 23 new mutations compared to the original strain. There is evidence that it is more contagious, and potentially more infectious to children than the original. There is currently no evidence that it impacts lethality or vaccine efficacy.

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  • 3 months later...
On 12/22/2020 at 10:07 AM, CharonY said:

Unlikely. A virus has only limited features that would change their physical properties. Moreover even more complex bacteria do not appear to become resistant to physical disruption in any meaningful way.

 

Hmmm, what about disinfection via tanning booth?  I wonder.

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