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Damn iNow that is really awesome! Many years from now your kids are going to be fighting over who gets to keep which of your projects. You are making things that will be in use in your family for years and years! 

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Finished it!

Built a chessboard for my daughters. Walnut and maple. Half lap joints held by pegs for the corners. Pleased with how it’s turned out   

Here is the finished product used a light oak stain with an outdoor gloss protective coat  

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  • 11 months later...
1 minute ago, zapatos said:

Beautiful! Are the squares individual pieces?

Glued long 2” wide strips together, alternating dark to light to dark. Looked kinda like the US flag. Then cut that into strips, flipped every other one, then glued again

C71BCCB5-7A49-4DB3-8A9A-CC75244EC6A1.jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, zapatos said:

I have two grand-daughters, both around the age of two. Made them doll houses for Christmas

Very nice, sir! I can see many many hours of play and imagination expanding experiences happening with those. They’re lucky to have you. 

Are the floors ply with some sort of banding?

TBH, the part that I keep returning to is trying to figure out what the heck that pink roof is made of. Lol. Also kudos for springing for the fancy poly casters. They’ll never realize just how much that shows that grandpa really loves them. :)

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2 minutes ago, iNow said:

Very nice, sir! I can see many many hours of play and imagination expanding experiences happening with those. They’re lucky to have you. 

Are the floors ply with some sort of banding?

TBH, the part that I keep returning to is trying to figure out what the heck that pink roof is made of. Lol. Also kudos for springing for the fancy poly casters. They’ll never realize just how much that shows that grandpa really loves them. :)

Haha, thanks! I appreciate the kind words. 😀

The floors are 3/4" birch plywood framed by 2x2 select pine. I put it together with glue and used a pocket hole jig which was the first time for me. Not as nice as other joinery but I wanted to try it out and see what all the fuss was about. Pocket holes worked well.

The pink roof (I looked for the most outrageous pink I could find!) is made from 1/4" poplar. I just laid out the pattern by using a lid from a jar on my workbench, cut it with a saber saw, and painted it.

I hope they like it. At two years old you never know, but if not now I'm sure they grow to like it later. And it is rock solid; four kids could climb on that and it would hold up fine.

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7 minutes ago, zapatos said:

Pocket holes worked well.

I’ve come to appreciate these when I need something fast and strong.

8 minutes ago, zapatos said:

just laid out the pattern by using a lid from a jar on my workbench, cut it with a saber saw, and painted it.

That’s brilliant!

8 minutes ago, zapatos said:

And it is rock solid; four kids could climb on that and it would hold up fine.

No doubt. Very cool! As I’m sure you already know, with 2 year olds the hard part is attention span... Squirrel!!

My daughter struggled to focus on those sorts of toys until she was closer to 4 or 5. It wasn’t until then that she could make up stories better in her own mind (kindergarten also really helped broaden her parameters for what’s possible). 

A few bits of furniture in there will go a very long way. Thanks for sharing!

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My finish has cured, I’ve sanded over 2,000 grit, and I’d like to polish it to a shine. I’ve got the needed equipment... pads, ROS, etc.., but wonder if anyone here has recommendations for polishing compound?

I’ve read some stuff online about using Maguire’s auto polish, or similar products from 3M. Anyone have experience with those or maybe a go-to option for grand piano-like polish?

Edited by iNow
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30 minutes ago, iNow said:

My finish has cured, I’ve sanded over 2,000 grit, and I’d like to polish it to a shine. I’ve got the needed equipment... pads, ROS, etc.., but wonder if anyone here has recommendations for polishing compound?

I’ve read some stuff online about using Maguire’s auto polish, or similar products from 3M. Anyone have experience with those or maybe a go-to option for grand piano-like polish?

Sorry, not me. I've never polished a finish I put on wood.

Is that for your chess board?

I was also meaning to ask you, what are you doing for the chess pieces?

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12 minutes ago, zapatos said:

Is that for your chess board?

Exactly. It’ll be the first build I’ve ever properly polished. Most others I just hand buff and wax after finishing.

I may head over to the Woodsmith Shop Store tomorrow and see what the fellas over there recommend. I’m probably overthinking it. 

12 minutes ago, zapatos said:

I was also meaning to ask you, what are you doing for the chess pieces?

We use a set that used to belong to my dad, the grandfather my kids never got to meet. Part of what inspired me to build this one is that his old game board we’ve been using is falling apart.

The romantic in me loves the idea of carving my own pieces, but the realist in me acknowledges that I can barely carve a spear tip and I’d probably just end up with a bunch of ugly firewood when all is said and done.

Edited by iNow
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1 minute ago, iNow said:

We use a set that used to belong to my dad, the grandfather my kids never got to meet. Part of what inspired me to build this one is that his old game board we’ve been using is falling apart.

I've got to say the chessboard you built really struck a chord with me. I have a chessboard my dad made for me and it is one of my most prized possessions. 

Like you he chose not to try to carve the pieces. He picked up a set in Mexico on a vacation one year.

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In case anyone can benefit from this... A medium low cut glaze / polishing compound did wonders. I used Meguiars 205 with a microfiber pad stuck on to my random orbital sander on medium speed and it really came out well 

I put it on and wiped it about 5x total

18EE9B94-6E72-4350-BDCE-0125EE7BB0E4.jpeg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Ha! It’s been some time, but I’ve seen that one. Amazing what we’re capable of. 

I’ve spent many tens of hours with a chainsaw, but don’t think I could be as precise as he was with it 

Edited by iNow
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22 minutes ago, iNow said:

Amazing what we’re capable of. 

Money is the main limitation in doing something..

(apart of physical limits)

Edited by Sensei
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  • 2 months later...

(I don't know wood.... It is not probably the best thread, but I didn't feel like opening a new one)

A small solid wooden beam (about 0.1x0.1x1.5m) is fastened at one end to metal plates (by screws); the other end is free. The sideways force acts on the beam. Is there any preference how I should place the screws (perpendicular to force direction or parallel to it - see sketches A and B below)?

image.png.390f1ae7631f4cd928a6fe8894817ec2.png

It is an oak beam. The force is impulse-like (not steady) - like if someone step on the beam from time to time.

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6 minutes ago, Danijel Gorupec said:

The sideways force acts on the beam.

I suspect Figure B would be better.

You’ll need the flat sides of the metal plate to resist the pushing force. The screws will almost surely tear the fibers of the oak and rip out the side if you use figure A. Basically, with figure B the metal resists the lever action of the wood on both the top AND the bottom. 

Caveat: This is just my intuition based on experience. I could very well be wrong about the mechanics involved. Good luck 

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B is much better.

With A There is a twist on the screws and if they are of conventional thread this will offer a constant unscrewing force tending to work the screws a bit loose.
Also with A the shear transfer is by friction from the clamping force between the plates any relaxation of which will tend to loosen the timber and cause sag at the loaded end.

Edit I would also add a small triangular gusset underneath the bottom metal support.

@iNow

I see you are advertising these people and I had a look but couldn't get past the cookie blog.

Are they still active ?

Edited by studiot
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23 minutes ago, studiot said:

I see you are advertising these people and I had a look but couldn't get past the cookie blog.

Sorry. I’m not following. What are you asking?

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  • 4 weeks later...

My latest completed build. Harder than anticipated with all of the curvy shapes and multiple species of wood, but super pleased with how it’s turned out. ✌️
 

 

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