Klaynos

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About Klaynos

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  • College Major/Degree
    PhD Physics
  • Favorite Area of Science
    Quantum Physics
  • Occupation
    Researcher

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  1. ! Moderator Note One of the rules you agreed to when you signed up is that people must be able to take part in the discussion without having to click any links. Therefore, would you kindly post some details of your ideas as just posting the links is against the rules.
  2. As someone who recruits graduate and postgraduate scientists and software engineers, I would look favourably on a mathematics background. But that's because a lot of the tasks we solve are mathematical in nature. I don't think you should have much of an issue applying your skills, you may find you need to do more background reading than your peers who have a compsci background.
  3. Kerbal space program?
  4. One of the best "I'm just a layman" type threads I've seen in a long while. All should be commended. ALine, you might enjoy having a look at the mathematical field of mechanics, specifically kinematics.
  5. Your question doesn't really have much meaning. Photons do not strongly interact with each other, so the answer is probably, no.
  6. What your describing is physical models. So trivially, yes, depending on accuracy and ignoring your example of earthquakes. To give an example slightly closer to earthquakes, then numerical weather forecasting?
  7. I'm not sure what you're talking about with the magnetic field. But, the pilots turn on and off the seatbelt light for turbulence based on a few things, including, other pilot reports, forecast wind conditions (i.e turbulence whilst entering or leaving a jet), forecast cat and convection and their nose weather radar.
  8. The problem with trying to absorb IR is that the thing you're trying to absorb it with is normally about the same temperature and is therefore also radiating IR. It makes things tricky and not very efficient. Bolometers for IR, for example, are normally actively cooled.
  9. We've had a discussion on this before. I suspect this want true for traditional diesel Vs electric due to the maximum output for the two engine types.
  10. In entanglement (or superposition more generally) there is no information transfer. Causality is maintained. It's a pretty common misconception that there is information exchange, often due to sloppy pros in popsci articles.
  11. As to the importance of mathematics in modern science. It's the language and the framework that the physical sciences are built. Repeatable predictions of physical measurements are fundemental to science, to do that accurately you need mathematics. "If I let go of this ball it will drop" is not as accurate as "if I let go of this ball, given the local gravity, air resistance and distance to the floor it will hit the ground in 7 seconds". You can then measure the 7 seconds and see if, given the relavent errors, the values are consistent with each other. As to the probability, even if it's very very very small, we should again refer to the great man (Douglas Adams),
  12. ! Moderator Note Please do not post threads or posts like this.
  13. Please don't take this as a negative on you. I want you to make the best (whichever that is) informed decision for you. None of your answer fills me with confidence. No, I didn't mean a software company. There's a distinct difference between someone who writes software and someone who is a software engineer (which would normally also include writing software). What you then go on to talk isn't quality assurance in the software engineering context. You wouldn't have scored highly. But that's ok at this stage, as long as you know that you're writing software rather than engineering then you can make an informed decision. Given your answer a follow up might be something along the lines of "what process did you go through to decide your database schema?"
  14. I don't know much about the US system but the team I manage does include software engineers. You say you'd be working as one, do you really mean you'd be working as a software engineer or would you be doing programming for a company who don't really know what software engineering is? That could make a big difference to you when you come to get your next job. A pretty simple interview question for an entry level software engineer might be something like "what importance do you place on quality assurance and what tools and practices have you employed to demonstrate this in a particular project?" I'd suggest you need to think about this role, it's prospects both in the company and what you might want to do career wise next, after collage. You might also be interested to know that for university graduates we look at their a-levels as well (equivalent age to high school in the USA).
  15. Part of the reduction in brightness is due to how lumens are defined, humans are more sensitive to the bluer end of the spectrum and the scale is weighted. So the same energy coming out the front actually changes bassed on colour temperature of the light. There are other factors like the thickness and types of coatings used to on the LEDs to get a white spectrum out. They're getting better at that though (the Samsung options especially it seems). I carry an astrolux S1 with an xpl hi most days. The lower cri isn't a big problem for the most part. But it might be something worth thinking about in the context of the thread. Next time I have to think about kitchen lighting I'll take it into account. I find the led lights ive got at the moment not great for cooking meat.