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is it true that science is consistent with all buddhist teachings?


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#1 mad_scientist

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Posted 4 April 2017 - 09:21 AM

anyone heard this as well?


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#2 DrP

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Posted 4 April 2017 - 09:39 AM

No. What about re-incarnation?


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#3 Prometheus

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Posted 4 April 2017 - 10:18 AM

Buddhism teaches rebirth not reincarnation; but i'm splitting hairs.

 

Far from all Buddhist doctrine is consistent with scientific knowledge. For instance some teachings state the Buddha has a golden bell end (glans penis)  -whether from birth or upon enlightenment i forget. There is also a sutta in which the Buddha performs some supernatural feats in order to impress a noble enough so they will actually listen to him. Plus loads more.

 

So science and buddhism are certainly not consistent regarding ALL teachings. But even in the latter example i gave it is stressed that the demonstration of supernatural powers is entirely irrelevant to what the Buddha is trying to teach: thus some consider Buddhism agnostic towards such things - sure it says they exist but they have no impact on the teachings so who cares either way.

 

What you may be thinking of is the Kalama sutta:

 

"It is proper for you, Kalamas, to doubt, to be uncertain;uncertainty has arisen in you about what is doubtful. Come, Kalamas. Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing; nor upon tradition; nor upon rumor; nor upon what is in a scripture; nor upon surmise; nor upon an axiom; nor upon specious reasoning; nor upon a bias towards a notion that has been pondered over; nor upon another's seeming ability; nor upon the consideration, 'The monk is our teacher.' Kalamas, when you yourselves know: 'These things are bad; these things are blamable; these things are censured by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to harm and ill,' abandon them.

 

 

Not bad for 500BC, but not quite the scientific method.


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#4 Eise

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Posted 4 April 2017 - 11:22 AM

No, definitely not. But one can distillate a kind of 'core-Buddhism' which fits pretty well to a scientific outlook.

 

E.g. the teaching of 'no-soul'. It doesn't literary say that a soul does not exist, but it says a soul does not exist independently: it is build up from the 5 Skandhas, and when we die the soul dissolves.

 

One way of understanding Buddhism is that it is a kind of humanism. And just as humanism usually does not contradict science, so neither does this 'core-Buddhism'.

 

However: one must be clear that it is the 'believer' (or 'practitioner') who brews this 'core-Buddhism'. Many traditional Buddhists do not accept such a stripped-of Buddhism.

 

But there is a rather strong movement in Europe and America known as 'Secular Buddhism'. See also here.

 

I am practising Zen meditation. I see this as a helpful method not just to know that the Ego has no independent existence (based on scientific and philosophical arguments (many of the modern philosophical arguments can already be found in Buddhist texts)), but also to feel that way.

 

In other words: Buddhist practice (not all its teachings!) might fit to a modern scientific world view. It gives hints how to get on par with a universe that is deaf to your needs, which might have created you, but will also destroy you in the end. It might be a way to have peace with the radical contingency of life.


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#5 EdEarl

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Posted 4 April 2017 - 11:29 AM

 

Dalai Lama XIV

If scientific analysis were conclusively to demonstrate certain claims in Buddhism to be false, then we must accept the findings of science and abandon those claims.

He doesn't speak for all Buddhists, but he is an important spokesperson.


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#6 Ten oz

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 02:09 AM

Science isn't consistent with or in anything but the process of verifying and collecting information. It is motiveless. Science isn't a philosophy it world view. It renders judgement or opinion no strongly that the thermostat in my living room.
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#7 Bender

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:43 AM

Turn it around.

 

Religions or ideologies can be consistent with science if they make no claims that contradict our current understanding of science.


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#8 EdEarl

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:26 AM

AFAIK no religion is completely consistent with science; although, I am ignorant of most religions. Wikipedia lists 19 major religions, but most, maybe all, have variations (e.g., Christianity - Catholic, Methodist, Baptist, etc.); there are religions of indigenous peoples (e.g., various American Indians) and religions from antiquity (e.g., Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Celtic, etc.) that aren't mentioned among the major religions. I've seen estimates of over 4000 religions; it is unlikely anyone knows them all. Nonetheless, I believe none are 100% scientific and no two religions are alike; there seem to be an infinite number of possible religious beliefs. Buddhism is not completely scientific.


Edited by EdEarl, 17 April 2017 - 10:31 AM.

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If there is a god, he is addicted to dice.

 


#9 Handy andy

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 08:49 AM

Buddha circa 500BC stated along the lines off "you must find our own light".


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#10 dimreepr

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 03:12 PM

I think all religions were compatible with science; when Christianity, for instance, was new and accepted widely, it adopted many of the beliefs in a given society.

 

No religion started with the dogma it later promotes, in fact it's perfectly possible science itself could become a religion, given enough time.

 

I think the reason Buddhism appears to be the closest religion, philosophically, to science is largely due to the fact, that of all the major religions, it's the youngest. 


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#11 Strange

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 08:18 PM

Buddha circa 500BC stated along the lines off "you must find our own light".

 

 

Huh?


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#12 Prometheus

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 09:39 PM

I think all religions were compatible with science; when Christianity, for instance, was new and accepted widely, it adopted many of the beliefs in a given society.

 

No religion started with the dogma it later promotes, in fact it's perfectly possible science itself could become a religion, given enough time.

 

I think the reason Buddhism appears to be the closest religion, philosophically, to science is largely due to the fact, that of all the major religions, it's the youngest. 

 

It predates Christianity and Islam.

 

And shouldn't the Mormons be closer to science than other Christians off-shoots?

 

 

Huh?

 

I thinks it's a reference to a quote from the Mahaparinibbana Sutta, about Buddha's last days and who should lead the brotherhood of monks after his death.

 

"Therefore, O Ananda, be ye lamps unto yourselves. Rely on yourselves, and do not rely on external help. Hold fast to the truth as a lamp. Seek salvation alone in the truth. Look not for assistance to any one besides yourselves."

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www.senseaboutscience.org/

 


#13 Strange

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:20 AM

I thinks it's a reference to a quote from the Mahaparinibbana Sutta, about Buddha's last days and who should lead the brotherhood of monks after his death.
 


But I wonder what the relevance to the subject of the thread is.
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#14 Prometheus

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 10:50 AM

I guess it's taken as an indication that Buddhism is compatible with science? 

 

It does suggest (along with other passages) less reliance on authority than other religions, making it easier to adjust to secular societies.

 

As an aside i've noticed some people complain that secular Buddhism is a distortion of the original teachings. But looking at the history of Buddhism, it has always been 'distorted' by the societies it meets. And surely that's a good thing: any religion that cannot adapt with humanity is a dead religion.


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The wild geese do not intend

To cast their reflection

The water has no mind

To retain their image.

 

www.senseaboutscience.org/

 


#15 dimreepr

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 01:05 PM

 

It predates Christianity and Islam.

 

That'll learn me for believing my teacher without checking myself :doh: .

 

But it does show how well the philosophy was explained, given how well time tends to mask meaning; an excuse, for not checking my facts, rather than a reason.


And shouldn't the Mormons be closer to science than other Christians off-shoots?

 

They all just re-interpret lost meaning (according to their needs), so I don't see why they would be. 

 

Understanding is the key, not a different style of dogma.


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#16 Jampelyang

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 07:47 PM

When you say all Buddhist teachings, you should mean The Great Dharma Treasury or the 84,000 teachings of Buddha or the Sutra's.  There are two types of Sutra's: 1. Wisdom 2. Compassion.  The Wisdom Surtra's contain Sciences.  There are two Sutra's written over 2000 yrs ago that deal with Earth/Cosmos Science, Quantum Physics, Chemistry.  They have been Validated by Science.  The one give the approx. time of the beginning of this current Climate change event.  Even gives the approx. time of the first single cell organism on this planet.  The other Sutra gives lifespans of celestial objects.  Combine both together, you get a Chemistry Lattice that maps out everything in this universe in chemical form. 

 

One know this because One unlocked those Sutra's and gave them to H.H. the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet and other Scientific communities.


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#17 Strange

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 09:14 PM

There are two Sutra's written over 2000 yrs ago that deal with Earth/Cosmos Science, Quantum Physics, Chemistry.  They have been Validated by Science. 

 

 

Citation needed.


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#18 Jampelyang

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 09:35 PM

1.  In the Indian language: "Arya Aparamita Ayurgyena Nama Mahayana Sutra." 

In the English language: "Great Vehicle Sutra of Unfathomable Exalted Life and Transcendental Wisdom."

 

2. short name the other is the "Infinite Life" Sutra

 

 

Both Sutra's are number based and one also contains Binary.  Both Sutra's connect to the Kalachakra.

 

Some of the translations are on this page:  https://www.facebook...ushriTathagata/


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#19 Strange

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 09:45 PM

I suppose I need to be clearer:

They have been Validated by Science. 

 
Citation needed.

Edited by Strange, 17 May 2017 - 09:45 PM.

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#20 studiot

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 09:51 PM

1.  In the Indian language: "Arya Aparamita Ayurgyena Nama Mahayana Sutra." 

In the English language: "Great Vehicle Sutra of Unfathomable Exalted Life and Transcendental Wisdom."

 

2. short name the other is the "Infinite Life" Sutra

 

 

Both Sutra's are number based and one also contains Binary.  Both Sutra's connect to the Kalachakra.

 

Some of the translations are on this page:  https://www.facebook...ushriTathagata/

 

 

 

Here is a translation of your citation, in pdf.

 

http://fpmt.org/wp-c...a_c5.pdf?x33127

 

 

I read enough to know that the answer to the OP is a resounding NO.

 

 

 

 

Manjushri, the life will be increased of any senti ent being who hears
the 108 names of the Unfathomable Life and Transcendental Wisdom
Extremely Discerning Aspect Victorious Glorifi cati on. Those
senti ent beings whose life is nearly complete, by keeping this holy
name their life will be increased. Manjushri, because it is like that,
the good qualiti es of any son or daughter of the race who, desiring a
long life, either hears the name of the Tathagata Unfathomable Life
and Transcendental Wisdom 108 ti mes, who writes it, causes others
to write it, or recites it, will be enhanced.


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