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Don410

Quantum immortality

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Posted (edited)

I’m about 99.999% sure that many worlds isn’t true. However, if many worlds seriously is true, isn’t quantum immortality an inevitably? 
 

Wouldn’t you  always have to perceive yourself as being in a world where you survive the most ridiculously unlikely of events? For hundreds or even thousands of years? 

There’s no scientific law that you have to die. It’s  just that, in a single universe paradigm, the odds will catch up to you after no more than 120 years with about 99.99999% certainty. However, if there are infinitely many universes, wouldn’t there have to be some universe out there where the Buddha is still alive? And wouldn’t that have to be the universe the Buddha experiences, since he can’t perceive his own death?

 

Edited by Don410

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Many Worlds is an interpretation of what the mathematics tell us, into 'understandable' concepts.
All interpretations are equally valid, whether it be Many Worlds, Copenhagen, or others, but only the mathematics are true.

There is a difference.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Don410 said:

I’m about 99.999% sure that many worlds isn’t true.

Out of curiosity, why?  What possible evidence do you have against it? Or is this just a statement of your lack of warm fuzzies for the view?

Quote

It’s  just that, in a single universe paradigm, the odds will catch up to you after no more than 120 years with about 99.99999% certainty. However, if there are infinitely many universes, wouldn’t there have to be some universe out there where the Buddha is still alive? And wouldn’t that have to be the universe the Buddha experiences, since he can’t perceive his own death?

This statement presumes that there is one 'the Buddha' that experiences one of the worlds and not any of the others. This is not what MWI is all about. That would be a supernatural philosophy, otherwise known as religion.  Wrong forum to discuss that.

Under MWI, all versions of a person are self-experienced (and yes, none experiences death), and there is no epiphenomenal entity that 'follows' one of them.

Edited by Halc

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21 hours ago, Don410 said:

I’m about 99.999% sure that many worlds isn’t true.

That would make quantum theory wrong. You would need to provide some pretty impressive evidence to support that claim.

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  This isn't really relevant to the main point here, but most people don't die because of "events".  They die because their body wears out.  And that would happen in any universe.

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On 7/20/2020 at 3:20 AM, MigL said:

Many Worlds is an interpretation of what the mathematics tell us, into 'understandable' concepts.

This is key, I think. There are several interpretations. They're not theories. The theory is quantum mechanics. You can bet that one is correct. Why it is correct being so mathematically ad hoc is another matter. That's where the different interpretations come up. IMO, the transactional interpretation is much more beautiful and parsimonious, although I must say I don't know it in detail.

The one with empty amplitudes and occupied amplitudes is also more plausible IMO, even though it's somewhat ugly. The consistent histories approach is another one.

As of today, I'm not aware that any of these have been finally confirmed or rejected experimentally or otherwise. There are claims in every which direction last time I looked, but I don't think there is unanimous thinking about that by any means.

As we speak, more physicists are considering arguments about these interpretations, or maybe even other possible interpretations. Which means the problem is not settled.

The elementary-particle-physicists' community favours the many-worlds interpretation, but that's all, as far as I understand. That's because their favourite toys (mainly the Wheeler-DeWitt eq.) are formulated within that framework. So it's a matter of heuristics and model-building, nothing else.

And that's my two cents.

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On 7/19/2020 at 8:59 PM, Don410 said:

I’m about 99.999% sure that many worlds isn’t true. However, if many worlds seriously is true, isn’t quantum immortality an inevitably? 
 

Wouldn’t you  always have to perceive yourself as being in a world where you survive the most ridiculously unlikely of events? For hundreds or even thousands of years? 

There’s no scientific law that you have to die. It’s  just that, in a single universe paradigm, the odds will catch up to you after no more than 120 years with about 99.99999% certainty. However, if there are infinitely many universes, wouldn’t there have to be some universe out there where the Buddha is still alive? And wouldn’t that have to be the universe the Buddha experiences, since he can’t perceive his own death?

 

There are sci-fi short stories based on this. Niven wrote one called All the Myriad Ways, but I was thinking of another - the synopsis doesn’t jibe with my recollection of the story I was thinking about.

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On 7/21/2020 at 11:23 AM, HallsofIvy said:

  This isn't really relevant to the main point here, but most people don't die because of "events".  They die because their body wears out.  And that would happen in any universe.


In the  more optimistic  versions of quantum immortality, there are some universes where your body never wears out, and you remain reasonably  healthy into old age.

 

In the less optimistic (and honestly probably far more realistic) version of quantum immortality, your body wears out but never actually dies. Basically your life turns into an eternal hell on earth where you keep coming infinitely close to dying without ever actually dying. 
 

Is there any scientific law saying that you have to die when your body wears out? I don’t think so. If there’s no scientific law saying you have to die because your body wears out, then there has to be a universe where you survive under MWI. Under MWI, anything with a probability above 0 has to happen.
 

 

Edited by Don410

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19 hours ago, Don410 said:

In the  more optimistic  versions of quantum immortality, there are some universes where your body never wears out, and you remain reasonably  healthy into old age.

So how do I move there?

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