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Bmpbmp1975

Dead galaxy questions

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So I have noticed it’s about a week now everyday there is a new article from a different source about this. Not sure why it keeps making the news day after day as though there is something up with it we should know about. 

From what I have been told the constant of 1/137 may have changed and if it fell below 1 it can put the universe in universe in a vacuum decay state 

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.sciencealert.com/astronomers-have-found-an-ancient-galaxy-that-grew-fast-then-died-suddenly/amp

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What are your questions?

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From what I have been told the constant of 1/137 may have changed and if it fell below 1 it can put the universe in universe in a vacuum decay state  with this data found 

Is this true

if that  is the case how long before it hits us

Edited by Bmpbmp1975

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Where did you hear that this is the result of a change in the fine structure constant ?

A Hubble bubble due to change in vacuum would propogate at c and as a result we would get no warning.

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47 minutes ago, Mordred said:

Where did you hear that this is the result of a change in the fine structure constant ?

A Hubble bubble due to change in vacuum would propogate at c and as a result we would get no warning.

So someone in another forum told me that the Newley found dead galaxy can mean the 1/137 has changed?

so if it did change then it can put the universe constant less than one which would move the universe out of metastable state

(  Well I would question such a claim unless they could provide a decent peer review article on it. There have been numerous studies of a potential varying fine structure constant. However deep field studies show no variation outside error measurement bars.) ?

 

has the 1/137 changed?

has the métastable state changed?

 

Edited by Bmpbmp1975

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  Well I would question such a claim unless they could provide a decent peer review article on it. There have been numerous studies of a potential varying fine structure constant. However deep field studies show no variation outside error measurement bars.

 

  

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Fine-structure constant (alpha) is used in equation of ionisation energy of Hydrogen. So, if alpha changes, ionisation energy must change.. or it would have to be compensated by change of other constant (which would not be considered constant anymore obviously)..

 

4 hours ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

From what I have been told the constant of 1/137 may have changed and if it fell below 1 it can put the universe in universe in a vacuum decay state 

Fine-structure constant is already below 1. It's 1/137 (less than 0.0073) already ;)

 

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9 hours ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

So someone in another forum told me that the Newley found dead galaxy can mean the 1/137 has changed?

Can mean. As in, one of many possible explanations, and without any kind of justification. I would surmise the argument is that if the fine structure constant changed then electromagnetic interactions would change characteristics or even "turn off" and we'd stop getting the light we're used to seeing. But there would probably be other ramifications and we'd have to investigate further.

 Mordred has stated that a Hubble bubble would travel at c. It would already be here if we can see this galaxy's weird state.

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Even with the propogation speed aside, the ramifications of a change in the fine structure constant should also affect spectrography measurements for example the 21 cm Hydrogen line.

Something like that would be bigger news than the article itself I would think.

 

Anyways here is the arxiv article for the above study. You will note that a changing fine structure constant is not on the list of possible causes.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.10158

Edited by Mordred

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The article says nothing about the light coming from it, just that it's not forming new stars. The fine structure constant wouldn't be the culprit — that's for electromagnetic interactions. You'd have to have a nuclear coupling change if that kind of explanation had any merit.

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My apologies I am still new and limitied to 5 posts per day. I saw your answers and that helped my understanding. Question

 can a  change in the fine-structure constant lead to vacuum decay.

Edited by Bmpbmp1975

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Hrrm vacuum decay isn't a very accurate descriptive of a quantum vacuum. A more accurate descriptive would be a different vacuum state.

 A change in the fine structure can affect the vacuum impedance value. Through the equivalent relation

[math]\alpha=\frac{e^2}{4\pi}\frac{Z_o}{\hbar}[/math]

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-structure_constant

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15 hours ago, swansont said:

The article says nothing about the light coming from it, just that it's not forming new stars. The fine structure constant wouldn't be the culprit — that's for electromagnetic interactions. You'd have to have a nuclear coupling change if that kind of explanation had any merit.

Where the he*l did I put my magnifying glass...

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44 minutes ago, Mordred said:

Hrrm vacuum decay isn't a very accurate descriptive of a quantum vacuum. A more accurate descriptive would be a different vacuum state.

 A change in the fine structure can affect the vacuum impedance value. Through the equivalent relation

α=e24πZo

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-structure_constant

So that’s a yes then, a change could lead to vacuum collapse 

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How do you collapse a vacuum ? A vacuum can have a wide range of energy states however a true vacuum is impossible under QM.

  

Edited by Mordred

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7 hours ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

My apologies I am still new and limitied to 5 posts per day. I saw your answers and that helped my understanding. Question

 can a  change in the fine-structure constant lead to vacuum decay.

People have looked to see if the fine structure constant (or any other fundamental constants) have changed over time. There is no evidence that they have or can change. You might as well worry about whether gravity might stop working tomorrow.

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1 hour ago, Mordred said:

How do you collapse a vacuum ? A vacuum can have a wide range of energy states however a true vacuum is impossible under QM.

  

QM?

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43 minutes ago, Bmpbmp1975 said:

QM?

Quantum mechanics 

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4 hours ago, MigL said:

Where the he*l did I put my magnifying glass...

Press ctrl - +...

 

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2 hours ago, Strange said:

Quantum mechanics 

I didn’t know it was impossible all the articles I have read and the works of Katie Mack state it is possible?

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17 hours ago, Mordred said:

Hrrm vacuum decay isn't a very accurate descriptive of a quantum vacuum. A more accurate descriptive would be a different vacuum state.

 A change in the fine structure can affect the vacuum impedance value. Through the equivalent relation

α=e24πZo

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-structure_constant

And you also stated it can be an change in the vacuum colloque theory 

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Ah. Well I stated vaccum collapse isn't accurate. Not in the circumstances your describing. You have to understand a vacuum describes an energy state with associations to pressure. 

For example the electroweak symmetry breaking resulted in a phase transition from the false vacuum to true vacuum. The false vaccuum describes a higher potential. This is one of the more likely causes of inflation.

Now ask yourself this question if the fine structure does change then some other of the following relations must also change.

[math]\alpha=\frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon^2}\frac{e^2}{\hbar c}[/math]

Where [math]\epsilon [/math] is the electric constant or permittability of free space.

e is the electric charge, c is the speed of light. So if the fine structure changes then another constant must have also changed.

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