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Pronunciation of fungi


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#1 NPK

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:06 AM

Another word that is pronounced inconsistently.

How do you pronounce it?

Fun-guy ?

Fun-ghee ?

Fun-jee ?

Fun-j-eye ?

Or some other way?
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#2 clarisse

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:15 AM

I pronounce it as fun-guy though I think I hear people saying it as fun-jee more often
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#3 insane_alien

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 02:47 PM

fun-guy, never heard different.
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#4 YT2095

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 02:57 PM

fung eye, for singular

fung ee, for plural is the most common way that I`ve heard it pronounced.

(or was it the other way around????)

eitherway I`m sure the difference is Plural/singular usage
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#5 ecoli

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 02:57 PM

I prefer fun-guy.

And when we're eating mushrooms for dinner, "There's a fungus amoung us"
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#6 YT2095

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 02:59 PM

Hmmm.. I think it may be the other way around like cactus and cacti, singular / plural respectively.
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#7 starbug1

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 03:26 PM

I always thought it was fungus-singular --- fun-j-eye, fung-eye plural, moreso fung-eye. I've never heard any different.
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#8 EvoN1020v

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 03:35 PM

Recommendation: Look in the dictionary. :-p
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#9 YT2095

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 03:48 PM

I always thought it was fungus-singular --- fun-j-eye, fung-eye plural, moreso fung-eye. I've never heard any different.


fungus is singular but specific also, a Particular Fungus.
a variety of fung ee.
it`s covered with a certain fung eye.
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#10 prion

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:33 PM

oh I'm just going to have to be different again and say fun-gee. No latin or greek word would ever be pronounced fun-guy, it sounds totally American :-) however people just seem to pick which one they like, I don't think there's a consensus

and the singular is fungus! a type of fungus, a fungus, lots of fungi! You wouldn't say "a species of trees" or "a breed of dogs". And fun-j-eye is just silly :-)
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#11 YT2095

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:39 PM

so you don`t consider the Plural of Fungus to be Fungi then?
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#12 prion

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 06:47 PM

so you don`t consider the Plural of Fungus to be Fungi then?


yeah: one fungus, lots of fungi. sorry if that wasn't very clear
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#13 taylrl

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 10:56 AM

one fungus, lots of fun-ghee
fun-guy is the american pronunciation of the plural
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#14 JustStuit

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 09:39 PM

In my biology class one was fungus and more were fun-guy. I don't know if this is specifically American though.
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#15 klumous

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Posted 5 December 2008 - 12:56 AM

Fungus is singular and the plural is fungi (pronounced fun-jeye). Usually with some exceptions, the hard (g) sound as in fungus, gate, goat and gum is pronounced when the (g) is followed by a, o and u. Usually with some exceptions, the soft (g) sound as in fungi, gentle, gin and gym is pronounced when the (g) is followed by e, i, and y. If there is ever a question as to the pronunciation of a word, one can always resort to looking it up in a dictionary or just googling pronunciation of the word and listen to the pronunciation of that word. Isnít technology great?
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#16 rick91

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Posted 1 January 2009 - 10:24 PM

I think funguy is american and fungee is english.
Fungus is taken directly from latin, and therefore the plural is correctly fungee, although this does not suit the american accent, therefore the difference, i think.
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#17 Wideranger

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 03:55 PM

At university, my supervisor was a mycologist, who used 'funj-eye' as the plural of fungus. My edition of the Oxford English agrees with him, and I defer to both. A few years ago, I
heard the head of mycology at Kew using 'fun-ghee'. He should have known better! Scientific eminence does not mean authority in matters of English pronunciation. It is possible, though, that later editions of the OED, or other dictionaries, may have accepted 'fun-ghee' and 'fun-guy'. I don't think there are any real transatlantic issues here.
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#18 Greg H.

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 04:00 PM

According to my dictionary, it's either fun-jeye or fun-guy - no long e sounds to found.
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#19 Salubrius

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:05 PM

I wasn't aware that it was pronounced any other way than fun-guy until today. This was the first time I had ever heard it being pronounced as fun-ghee, and it was on the BBC no less, so naturally it peaked my curiosity.

To my mind fungi is originally a plural tense of fungus deriving from Latin, and thus pronounced the same as cacti and octopi. I have never heard these plurals pronounced cactee or octopee (unfortunately for the English language it is more common to hear cactuses and octopuses these days, or just using the singular as the plural).

The biological understanding and correct classification of fungi is a relatively recent development, and if the pronunciation has altered due to this, surely it would only apply when referring to the kingdom fungi? In which case I would surmise that pronunciation depends on context, fun-guy meaning plural and fun-ghee meaning the kingdom.
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#20 Strange

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 09:20 AM

To my mind fungi is originally a plural tense of fungus deriving from Latin, and thus pronounced the same as cacti and octopi. I have never heard these plurals pronounced cactee or octopee (unfortunately for the English language it is more common to hear cactuses and octopuses these days, or just using the singular as the plural).

 

 

Octopus is derived from Greek and the correct English plural (it is an English word, after all) is octopuses. (The Greek plural is chtapodia.)

 

As to original question, I think I say fun-guy in England but probably say foon-jee when living in Italy (even if speaking English!)


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