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Hazel M

Laptop vs Desk Top

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I know the pros of a laptop over a desk top. Whatever purchase we want to make anywhere, everyone can quote all the reasons why we should. They leave us to discover the negatives after purchase - a bad time to find out. I am considering switching from a desk top to a laptop. Please tell me the negatives. I know the positives but what will I be sacrificing? If I know those, I can make an intelligent decision. Thanks.

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1) if laptop is damaged, you cannot fix it usually. Most likely you won't find any electronic shop willing to fix it. They don't have spare hardware.

 

2) laptop can easily overheat. It has no good circulation of air inside. I had laptop couple years ago that was shutting down in summer time while playing Counter-Strike: Source for a while. And it killed it permanently (gfx card broken, and couldn't get replacement).

 

3) if you plan to crunch a lot of data by applications, doing calcs, it's not good choice (see above)

 

4) limited hardware extending. You can just add memory and replace hard disk.

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In terms of bang for buck last time I looked desktops were much better value.

 

Your children, spouse, parents, best friend etc won't ask to borrow it, take it home, leave it on bus, etc

 

If you knock a can of coke over the keyboard it costs about 20 quid to fix.

 

You won't be tempted to "work" in front of TV - cos we all know that work does not happen when the goggle-box is demanding your attention.

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1) if laptop is damaged, you cannot fix it usually. Most likely you won't find any electronic shop willing to fix it. They don't have spare hardware.

 

2) laptop can easily overheat. It has no good circulation of air inside. I had laptop couple years ago that was shutting down in summer time while playing Counter-Strike: Source for a while. And it killed it permanently (gfx card broken, and couldn't get replacement).

 

3) if you plan to crunch a lot of data by applications, doing calcs, it's not good choice (see above)

 

4) limited hardware extending. You can just add memory and replace hard disk.

Thank you so very much. Your #1 surprises me. My main reason for considering a laptop was ease of taking it in for repairs. With my desktop I have to beg (and usually fail to get) someone to come to my home. I have no way to take it to a shop.

 

I think you just changed my mind. Surely do appreciate your reply.

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If you're considering a laptop for its portability, know that it's not a good idea to move around with a laptop while it's running. Hard drives like stability.

 

Battery power is usually a big consideration, so you should think about how you want to use a laptop. Are you using it in places where you have no plug-in, so battery is more important? A bigger battery may be necessary, it may change how the laptop sits, it will definitely change the weight.

 

I have a standard battery, gives me 3-4 hours, but I don't need that part so much. I tend to haul my laptop in a backpack around the city, find a wi-fi hotspot, plug in my laptop, plug my phone and bluetooth headset into my laptop, and can now office from any decent coffee shop.

 

I know that I give up a lot of computing power, longevity, and monitor benefits with a laptop, but I really have no choice. Desktop hasn't been practical for me for years.

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In terms of bang for buck last time I looked desktops were much better value.

 

Your children, spouse, parents, best friend etc won't ask to borrow it, take it home, leave it on bus, etc

 

If you knock a can of coke over the keyboard it costs about 20 quid to fix.

 

You won't be tempted to "work" in front of TV - cos we all know that work does not happen when the goggle-box is demanding your attention.

Thanks to you, also. Worth thinking about. A smile on the last. I have no TV in my home and almost wish I had no computer. But, yes, the rest fits. Good. I've changed my mind.

If you're considering a laptop for its portability, know that it's not a good idea to move around with a laptop while it's running. Hard drives like stability.

 

Battery power is usually a big consideration, so you should think about how you want to use a laptop. Are you using it in places where you have no plug-in, so battery is more important? A bigger battery may be necessary, it may change how the laptop sits, it will definitely change the weight.

 

I have a standard battery, gives me 3-4 hours, but I don't need that part so much. I tend to haul my laptop in a backpack around the city, find a wi-fi hotspot, plug in my laptop, plug my phone and bluetooth headset into my laptop, and can now office from any decent coffee shop.

 

I know that I give up a lot of computing power, longevity, and monitor benefits with a laptop, but I really have no choice. Desktop hasn't been practical for me for years.

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If you're considering a laptop for its portability, know that it's not a good idea to move around with a laptop while it's running. Hard drives like stability.

 

That's correct. I know many people that damaged HDD this way..

 

Traditional spinning HDDs can be replaced by flash memory that are in HDD box (SSD - Solid-State Drive), same plugs as normal disk.

 

But they are expensive. 250 GB for $140. 1 TB for $420.

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Electronics-2-5-Inch-Internal-MZ-7TE250BW/dp/B00E3W1726/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1404062035&sr=1-1&keywords=ssd+hard+drive

Edited by Sensei

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Laptops don't make great host servers most of the time. It is far easier to replace the monitor on a desktop. Most desktop's have lan ports for static ip many laptops dont. If a desktop doesn't have a lan port you can buy a cheap network card.

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5) desktops have far much better LCD panels (laptops have to save power, desktops don't). Your eyes will be working longer.

Never ever buy display without seeing how it works in practice.

If eyes hurt after several hours of work, you have to replace it by different model..

Edited by Sensei

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Thanks all. Since I only use it at home, it seems a desk top wins. I do appreciate your replies. Just what I needed.

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I reflect on the likely situation in X decades time when a teenager might run across this thread and, in bewilderment, ask "Did they really have discrete computers then? I mean wasn't everything just sort of wired into the cloud through the access chip in your skull?"

 

History never seems quaint while you are living in it.

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I reflect on the likely situation in X decades time when a teenager might run across this thread and, in bewilderment, ask "Did they really have discrete computers then? I mean wasn't everything just sort of wired into the cloud through the access chip in your skull?"

 

History never seems quaint while you are living in it.

I reflect on the likely situation in X decades time when a teenager might run across this thread and, in bewilderment, ask "Did they really have discrete computers then? I mean wasn't everything just sort of wired into the cloud through the access chip in your skull?"

 

History never seems quaint while you are living in it.

True but no one is going to be messing with my skull. :)

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If screen size is important, desk top can handle much larger screens.

Print size certainly is. Is print size on laptops adjustable to large?

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The screen size you can plug into a laptop is not limited by the laptop.

Many laptops have an HDMI port which carries both high definition television / video and sound in one cable. Very few desktops have this.

Touch screens have not been a success for desktops, but are readily availabale in laptops and tablets.

If you buy a laptop beware of closing it with an object such as a pen inside. Broken screen replacement costs run from about £90 to about £350.

Be careful of the power connector, they are overweak and the laptop usually has to be dismantled to replace. A good practice is to place a weight (book etc) onto the cable to prevent the full weight of the power supply/lead/interference suppressor dragging on the conputer jack.

Do not obstruct the air vents. Many laptops have air vents on the undersurface. I recall one client who burnt out his laptop by working in a heavily upholstered armchair and resting the latop on the padded arm, thus blocking these vents.

 

On the other hand working on a laptop can be worse for your health, so much so that there is a (much ignored) EU health & safety directive that requires workers to be provided with separate screen and keyboard to avoid RSI and eye problems.

You are better off with separates if working for long periods, you can also adjust the chair to suit as well.

 

:)

Oh and on screen print size can be adjusted in most programs by adjusting the zoom on either laptops or desktops.

Edited by studiot

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On the other hand working on a laptop can be worse for your health, so much so that there is a (much ignored) EU health & safety directive that requires workers to be provided with separate screen and keyboard to avoid RSI and eye problems.

This sells me on desk top. I have enough trouble reading this screen. So, thank you all. I'll struggle on.

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Windows has lots of options to help make life easier.

 

Look at the accessibility options in the XP control panel

 

Also look at the magnifier

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows-xp/help/turn-on-magnifier

You are right. Then there's the magnifier that I hold in my hand. Have you noticed that the smaller the print, the lighter in gray it is? Put a magnifier over it and it not only enlarges, it darkens.

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If you want to magnify text in web browser press ctrl +

It works with Firefox & Chrome, not sure about others.

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1) if laptop is damaged, you cannot fix it usually. Most likely you won't find any electronic shop willing to fix it. They don't have spare hardware.

 

For the record, I don't think repair problems with laptops are due to lack of spare hardware, at least not in my experience. What usually makes laptops harder to fix is that it costs more in labor because you have to pull so much out to get to anything. If you bought your laptop for under $500, you may be reluctant to spend more than $100 to fix it, especially if it's a year or two old already.

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If you want to magnify text in web browser press ctrl +

It works with Firefox & Chrome, not sure about others.

Yes, I do that often. Fast and easy. By the way, can you get all these different choices of programs like which email to use on laptops?

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Yes, I do that often. Fast and easy. By the way, can you get all these different choices of programs like which email to use on laptops?

 

Software rarely cares if it's on a PC or a laptop. Mobile applications for your phone are usually different, but an operating system like Windows and programs for email will function equally well on desktop or laptop.

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For the record, I don't think repair problems with laptops are due to lack of spare hardware, at least not in my experience. What usually makes laptops harder to fix is that it costs more in labor because you have to pull so much out to get to anything. If you bought your laptop for under $500, you may be reluctant to spend more than $100 to fix it, especially if it's a year or two old already.

I am beginning to think that is true of desk tops but that's another topic deserving of a separate thread when I get time.

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For the record, I don't think repair problems with laptops are due to lack of spare hardware, at least not in my experience. What usually makes laptops harder to fix is that it costs more in labor because you have to pull so much out to get to anything. If you bought your laptop for under $500, you may be reluctant to spend more than $100 to fix it, especially if it's a year or two old already.

 

Try to buy mother board, gfx card, or cpu for any laptop...

 

I would be delighted to get gfx card for mine broken laptop on free market. I could spend hours to unscrew everything and replace it. It's not a problem.

I have paid for it $2500 in 2007 (the best and the fastest laptop at that day on the world), and can't get gfx card that for normal PC would be $50. I would even pay up to $300 just to have it running.

 

Laptop manufacturers force you to buy completely new one, if old one is broken.

Edited by Sensei

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