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DimaMazin

Time definition

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Posted (edited)

t = ((dx)2/c2+q2)1/2

t is time

dx is quantity of motion

c is velocity of light

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion

q = t'  for traveling object

Edited by DimaMazin

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44 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion

What does that mean? What units does q have?

Is it the same as inertia?

Quote

q = t'  for traveling object

You haven't specified what t' is.

How does any of this relate to the speed of this travelling object?

 

Once again, you have thrown together a random equation. What is any of the supposed to mean?

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1 hour ago, DimaMazin said:

dx is quantity of motion

In addition to what @Strange wrote; your definition looks circular. As far as I know motion, in physics*, is the change in position of an object with respect to its surroundings in a given interval of time. How do you define motion to be able to define time to be dependent on motion?

 

*) paraphrase of wikipedia/Motion 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Strange said:

What does that mean? What units does q have?

Is it the same as inertia?

You haven't specified what t' is.

How does any of this relate to the speed of this travelling object?

 

Once again, you have thrown together a random equation. What is any of the supposed to mean?

Clock correctly shows time only then when their  motion of arrows and  mechanism counteraction to the motion correspond to my formula.

t' is time of traveler

q is not Newtonian inertia.

Unit of q is second, maybe quantum phisicits will create another unit.

Energy should travel at c without forces counteraction.

23 minutes ago, Ghideon said:

In addition to what @Strange wrote; your definition looks circular. As far as I know motion, in physics*, is the change in position of an object with respect to its surroundings in a given interval of time. How do you define motion to be able to define time to be dependent on motion?

 

*) paraphrase of wikipedia/Motion 

 

 

We can define change of distance without known time. 

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8 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

Clock correctly shows time only then when their  motion of arrows and  mechanism counteraction to the motion correspond to my formula.

I have no idea what that is supposed to mean.

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24 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

Energy should travel at c without forces counteraction.

A ball of mass m, moving at speed v, has mass+kinetic energy. Why/how does that energy move at c?

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29 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

We can define change of distance without known time. 

How?

 

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47 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

We can define change of distance without known time. 

Change [of distance] occurs in time. Time is not specifically a result of change. imho.

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3 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion

q = t'  for traveling object

If the motion is at constant velocity, there is no force, so presumably no “counteraction” Thus q = 0

You haven’t defined t’

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Let's solve such task:

We know distance between the Earth and green planet. Green traveler turned on its  clock at start of travel to us. The traveler was traveling at different and unknown speeds. Time of start of the travel is unknown and  we should define it. The green traveler has errieved to us and showed time of  traveling clock. I can simply solve the task using my equation. Can you solve the task simpler?

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

Green traveler turned on its  clock 

How did green traveler define time to be able to create a clock?

 

I maybe do not understand what you mean when you use the Word ”definition” in your math.

Edited by Ghideon

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29 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

Let's solve such task:

We know distance between the Earth and green planet. Green traveler turned on its  clock at start of travel to us. The traveler was traveling at different and unknown speeds. Time of start of the travel is unknown and  we should define it. The green traveler has errieved to us and showed time of  traveling clock. I can simply solve the task using my equation. Can you solve the task simpler?

There isn't enough information (ie. no numbers).

But feel free to show how your equation "solves" this, instead of just claiming that it does.

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1 hour ago, Strange said:

There isn't enough information (ie. no numbers).

But feel free to show how your equation "solves" this, instead of just claiming that it does.

We can use variables

dx is distance between the planets

t1 is time of start of travel

t2 is time  of end of travel

t' is time of traveling clock at end of travel

t2 - t1 =(( dx)2/c2 +t'2)1/2

We need to define t1

t1=t2  - ((dx)2/c2 + t'2)1/2 

3 hours ago, swansont said:

If the motion is at constant velocity, there is no force, so presumably no “counteraction” Thus q = 0

You haven’t defined t’

Forces exist in mass. Mass can not exist without forces.

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8 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

t = ((dx)2/c2+q2)1/2

t is time

dx is quantity of motion

c is velocity of light

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion

q = t'  for traveling object

q is temporal inertia in an expanding universe where time is the expansion of space (suggestion based according to the above formula if we multiply and divide the right part by x) 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

t1 is time of start of travel

t2 is time  of end of travel

t' is time of traveling clock at end of travel

t2 - t1 =(( dx)2/c2 +t'2)1/2

 

In the clock's frame of reference, shouldn't t`=tsub2 - tsub1?

Edited by moth

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8 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

We can use variables

dx is distance between the planets

t1 is time of start of travel

t2 is time  of end of travel

t' is time of traveling clock at end of travel

t2 - t1 =(( dx)2/c2 +t'2)1/2

We need to define t1

t1=t2  - ((dx)2/c2 + t'2)1/2 

Now show that this produces the same results as SR.

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12 hours ago, Ghideon said:

How?

 

 You can measure short distance  by ruler, then you can define dx. Scientists can measure large dx of light by brightness of supernova.

6 hours ago, moth said:

In the clock's frame of reference, shouldn't t`=tsub2 - tsub1?

Then speed of travel=0

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13 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

You can measure short distance  by ruler, then you can define dx.

Which frame of reference is dx measured in?

 

17 minutes ago, Strange said:

Now show that this produces the same results as SR.

Or show how you derived your equation from SR.

I am assuming you didn't just make it up from thin air.

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11 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

Forces exist in mass. Mass can not exist without forces.

So? Internal forces don’t affect motion. Why would they affect time?  Why would time run differently for a hydrogen atom than a carbon atom, moving at the same speed?

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9 hours ago, Strange said:

Which frame of reference is dx measured in?

 

Or show how you derived your equation from SR.

I am assuming you didn't just make it up from thin air.

t'c/(c - v2)1/2 = t

t2=t'2c2/(c2-v2)

t2=t'2c2/(c2-dx2/t2)

t'2c2/(t2c2-dx2)=1

t'2c2=t2c2-dx2

t'2c2/c2+dx2/c2=t2

t2=dx2/c2+t'2

t=(dx2/c2+t'2)1/2

We can not use the equation for solve of my task because we should know more data

 

7 hours ago, swansont said:

So? Internal forces don’t affect motion. Why would they affect time?  Why would time run differently for a hydrogen atom than a carbon atom, moving at the same speed?

I am wrong there.

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I have misinterpreted the intention of the headline "Time definition". You are trying to calculate a time t? I thought you were posting a definition of time; so my comments probably don't apply.

 

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On 8/18/2019 at 11:08 PM, Ghideon said:

I have misinterpreted the intention of the headline "Time definition". You are trying to calculate a time t? I thought you were posting a definition of time; so my comments probably don't apply.

 

t = q/m

t is time of observer

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion of motionlees object

m is mass of motionless object

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2 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

t = q/m

t is time of observer

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion of motionlees object

m is mass of motionless object

That does not match earlier statements. What units does t, q and m have?

Earlier posts:

On 8/17/2019 at 7:17 PM, DimaMazin said:

q = t'  for traveling object

and

On 8/17/2019 at 9:36 PM, DimaMazin said:

Unit of q is second, maybe quantum phisicits will create another unit.

So what is q? 

 

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1 hour ago, Ghideon said:

That does not match earlier statements. What units does t, q and m have?

Earlier posts:

and

So what is q? 

 

t has second

m has kilogram

q has second * kilogram

If quantity of counteraction of forses to motion doesn't exist then how Swansont defined different quantities of it for different masses?

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9 minutes ago, DimaMazin said:

t has second

m has kilogram

q has second * kilogram

And

4 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

q is quantity of counteraction of forces to motion of motionlees object

What kind of "force" has kg*s as unit? Compare definition of Newton:  [math] kg*m*s^{-2}  [/math]

4 hours ago, DimaMazin said:

m is mass of motionless object

If object is motionless then there is no force acting on it so q=0 and therefore t = q/m = 0. Do you mean that time stands still for objects at rest?

 

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