Jingori

Why do we have to write so many highschool papers?

Recommended Posts

Hi, so I am reading Ballad of the White Horse by G.K. Chesterton, Love the book, but why do I have to write a paper on an epic poem when I can already write well enough to get A's in my english class? I'm not thinking about pursuing writing as a career. I'm thinking about doing nuclear engineering. I mean I kinda don't get very much from the class, but it's required. Not only that, but the class actually detracts from my education because I have less time to study math and science which are far more difficult and technical. That and I am pulling my hair out because my teacher wants me to use very specific parts of the poem.... Which raises the question: Why isn't this just a test? And the other question: why is writing considered so important even for the people that are going straight into science, and why is it a requirement even in college? What makes the english language that important? It isn't communication because we practice that nearly every second of our lives, so what is it? Is it one of those things where someone in the 1860's hated their life so much they wanted to make everyone else's hell? This class is making me want to drop out.... I won't but I want to. 

 

Help me figure out how to actually do this because frankly I am procrastinating on this, and I NEVER procrastinate on school stuff, like my friends say I'm like an Asian because of how hard I work on all my school stuff. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Writing is a gift you give yourself but allow others to open. Subject is secondary to how interestingly it's described.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there, I'll be answering your question(s) in components so please bear with me. 

32 minutes ago, Jingori said:

Hi, so I am reading Ballad of the White Horse by G.K. Chesterton, Love the book, but why do I have to write a paper on an epic poem when I can already write well enough to get A's in my English class? 

 


Whilst I understand your frustration as I'm sure the education system is far from perfect, you have to sometimes see things from the perspective of the professors, lecturers or teachers that assign you your work. Though you yourself might be confident that you know the course you're currently taking or the skill being taught like the back of your hand, you must see that the teacher wouldn't inherently have this knowledge, as a result they may assign you many papers or essays to complete so that they may figure it out. Or perhaps they already know you're very good at the course, however, they may require physical evidence in the form of essays to confirm to people that don't know you (i,e independently marked exams) in order to justify your marks. Also, just by the way, in what country are you sitting these exams? I ask this since in Scotland we are a bit more relaxed with regards to the number of papers being assigned. 

34 minutes ago, Jingori said:

I'm not thinking about pursuing writing as a career. I'm thinking about doing nuclear engineering. I mean I kinda don't get very much from the class, but it's required. Not only that, but the class actually detracts from my education because I have less time to study math and science which are far more difficult and technical. That and I am pulling my hair out because my teacher wants me to use very specific parts of the poem.... Which raises the question: Why isn't this just a test? And the other question: why is writing considered so important even for the people that are going straight into science, and why is it a requirement even in college? What makes the english language that important? It isn't communication because we practice that nearly every second of our lives, so what is it? Is it one of those things where someone in the 1860's hated their life so much they wanted to make everyone else's hell? This class is making me want to drop out.... I won't but I want to. 

1

Though I'm sure people in the 1860s would love to make our Lives difficult for us, it isn't quite why English class is as uniquely complicated as it is. you have to keep in mind that English is a skill, which is very different from courses like Physics and Biology which often have right or wrong answers. In English, you are often bereft of concepts like objectively correct arguments (unless statistics are involved). The exercises that I performed in my Higher English class (A levels in Scotland) were intended to show your ability in critical analysis (interpretive reading, like determining tone or intention), creative (writing a compelling story) or discursive (examining a subject or event) writing as well as essay writing (summarizing books in essay formats under timed conditions). These did various things and were intended to measure your skills in English. Although my exams were structured so that if you sucked at creative writing and failed that part of the course if you did exceedingly well in either critical analysis or discursive writing you could actually pass with if you did exceedingly well in either critical analysis or discursive writing you could actually pass with decent or extremely good grades. It is unfortunate for people like yourself (and I totally understand as I had gone through similar dilemmas during my English course) who might be more analytically minded than creatively.

It's very difficult to give you an analysis of your current predicament within your school since you've omitted what country the exams you're sitting are taking place in. My advice nevertheless is to either find an alternative that works to give you the path or to grit your teeth and deal with it. Life is unfortunately unforgiving for people pursuing STEM fields since so few go into them.

Keep in mind that we're all quite nice people here and are happy to give help (not to be confused with "Do for you" )  with work in most subjects if you need it, just be specific. 

Good luck! 

- Robert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion is that ones ability to compose thoughts collectively and cohesively on paper reflect their ability to think. Progressive education tells us we should be good at a multitude of skills which may not have equal value to everyone. However, if you were never exposed to said subjects you may not find what interests you. So for me I was a kid in high school who got good grades by virtue of sheer ability. I did what was needed to pass and that’s as far as that went. I literally got A-‘s and B+’s without doing anything and was considered lazy. Mind you that this occurred in one of the most competitive areas in the US education system. Now at 26 years old, i’m back in college milking the education system for everything they have. Moreover, what Interests you now will likely change, and when that happens having a diverse educational background will pay dividends. Think of it as having a Batman utility belt of scholastic skills. They will all come in handy at some point in time. But in the short term, dissecting each assignment based on translatability In your day to day is too close minded. Most daily activities would be rendered moot with such logic anyway. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FrankP said:

In my opinion is that ones ability to compose thoughts collectively and cohesively on paper reflect their ability to think.

This hits the nail on the head.  +1

Writing is foundatiinal in helping us each understand what we really think and allowing us to communicate that effectively to others. It’s critical to practice and forever improve this skill set, ESPECIALLY while we’re still developing, still in school, and still figuring out who we are as human beings.

 

Flan-quote.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, DeoxyRiboRobert said:

Hi there, I'll be answering your question(s) in components so please bear with me. 


Whilst I understand your frustration as I'm sure the education system is far from perfect, you have to sometimes see things from the perspective of the professors, lecturers or teachers that assign you your work. Though you yourself might be confident that you know the course you're currently taking or the skill being taught like the back of your hand, you must see that the teacher wouldn't inherently have this knowledge, as a result they may assign you many papers or essays to complete so that they may figure it out. Or perhaps they already know you're very good at the course, however, they may require physical evidence in the form of essays to confirm to people that don't know you (i,e independently marked exams) in order to justify your marks. Also, just by the way, in what country are you sitting these exams? I ask this since in Scotland we are a bit more relaxed with regards to the number of papers being assigned. 

Though I'm sure people in the 1860s would love to make our Lives difficult for us, it isn't quite why English class is as uniquely complicated as it is. you have to keep in mind that English is a skill, which is very different from courses like Physics and Biology which often have right or wrong answers. In English, you are often bereft of concepts like objectively correct arguments (unless statistics are involved). The exercises that I performed in my Higher English class (A levels in Scotland) were intended to show your ability in critical analysis (interpretive reading, like determining tone or intention), creative (writing a compelling story) or discursive (examining a subject or event) writing as well as essay writing (summarizing books in essay formats under timed conditions). These did various things and were intended to measure your skills in English. Although my exams were structured so that if you sucked at creative writing and failed that part of the course if you did exceedingly well in either critical analysis or discursive writing you could actually pass with if you did exceedingly well in either critical analysis or discursive writing you could actually pass with decent or extremely good grades. It is unfortunate for people like yourself (and I totally understand as I had gone through similar dilemmas during my English course) who might be more analytically minded than creatively.

It's very difficult to give you an analysis of your current predicament within your school since you've omitted what country the exams you're sitting are taking place in. My advice nevertheless is to either find an alternative that works to give you the path or to grit your teeth and deal with it. Life is unfortunately unforgiving for people pursuing STEM fields since so few go into them.

Keep in mind that we're all quite nice people here and are happy to give help (not to be confused with "Do for you" )  with work in most subjects if you need it, just be specific. 

Good luck! 

- Robert.

The interesting thing is: I am very creatively minded, and very analytical. I am a semi-professional pianist and I have written three pieces one of which I performed at the theater in my town, and I greatly enjoy music. But at the same time I am very analytical when it comes to study, I love complexity, if you look at the list of music I like (Megadeth, Cynic, Yngwie Malmsteem, the list goes on) you'd notice that I appear to be obsessed with complexity. I don't know, something that isn't easily done or figured out just intrigues me. And STEM subjects are really easy for me for one reason: They work off common formulas as math is the basis of physics, physics is the basis of chemistry, and chemistry is the basis of biology. As such you'll find that oftentimes one field's formulas, rationale and finer points are very similar to another's. And since I love studying things in my free time on Khan Academy and other websites as well as through the usage of my more than adequate library of physics and chemistry textbooks (Courtesy of my father's university days) I am a little bit ahead in those subjects. 

That being said, I don't like it when I get hung up on an English paper, it freaks me out because then I don't feel like I'm accomplishing anything. 

I feel like I used to when I used to screw around and not pay attention in school, when my life was screwed up as hell. 

I guess my real question is: How the hell do I get through this let alone college when I can't seem to manage to get through an English paper without being exasperated. Weird thing is, I love science papers, and reading books like the 2008 emergency response guidebook for hazmat. 

5 hours ago, iNow said:

This hits the nail on the head.  +1

Writing is foundatiinal in helping us each understand what we really think and allowing us to communicate that effectively to others. It’s critical to practice and forever improve this skill set, ESPECIALLY while we’re still developing, still in school, and still figuring out who we are as human beings.

 

Flan-quote.png

I live near Andalusia. Interesting coincidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, Jingori, let me say welcome and observe that I to chafed at the choice of study subjects imposed from on high for the good of my soul.

In defence let me say that they have to select material that will cover everybody's needs and of course everybody is different.

But they do try to include selections so that everbody will find at least something to gain from.

Does you course include a 'Use of English' or Use of Language subject. We did that in my day a senior school level.

 

Yopu might like to look out this book, published by the UK Institution of Civil Engineers

Communication for Professional Engineers (2nd ed)

By Bill Scott

 

It is a masterpiece of clarity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll just add this:  you say "I'm not about pursuing writing as a career. I'm thinking about doing nuclear engineering."  What nuclear engineers do most is write!  In fact, what physicists, mathematicians, engineers in general, etc. etc.  do most is write.  They all may do many different kinds of things but they are of no use if they are not conveyed to other people.  A nuclear engineer, for example, will spend most of his time writing proposals, reports, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I definitely know what youre talking about. It's the opposite for me - I LOVE english and writing classes, but I detest math and have absolutely no use for it in my daily routing. Every morning in math class I literally want to kill myself or break the desk. JK. But its a waste of time. 

High school just sets you up for anything and everything. Classes range from Tech to Dance to Art to Math to Science to COOKING CLASS (it exists, pathetic) to Chemistry to Calculus to Yearbook. Once highschool is over, and your freshman year of college, you can pick the classes you WANT. It'll be awesome. 

And don't worry, your career will come to you. You have time to figure it out, it's not as demanding as you think. Some people dont figure it out till 2nd year college.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Sammanta said:

Yeah, I definitely know what youre talking about. It's the opposite for me - I LOVE english and writing classes, but I detest math and have absolutely no use for it in my daily routing. Every morning in math class I literally want to kill myself or break the desk. JK. But its a waste of time. 

I was the exact same way. Now, I wish I had gotten a tutor to help me over my stumbling block with math. I had absolutely no idea what knowledge would help in my life and what wouldn't. 

Knowing an important language like math will literally change the way a person approaches any project. It's more than a skill set, it's like a sensory filter, something that adds a layer of nuance to your perspective.

It's never a waste of time to dispel ignorance. It's all about constantly honing your mind with information that lets you adapt to virtually any situation you find yourself in. Plus, a current trend is hiring for language and science skills in finance, so math skills are a great crossover for a person interested in a wide choice of careers. Just sayin'. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doing scientific research has almost no benefit to anyone unless one publishes the results, presumably in the form of a journal article.  I have read many student laboratory reports, and I have read and written scientific papers.  Writing well is a very difficult but very important skill to master.  Part of writing clearly is thinking clearly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13.06.2018 at 9:42 AM, Sammanta said:

but I detest math and have absolutely no use for it in my daily routing. (...) But its a waste of time. 

Are not you shopping? Without mathematical knowledge, you would not know how much to pay, or whether the clerk calculated the right price and returned the appropriate rest.

Your binocular vision of eyes and in your brain is utilizing Pythagoras triangle to calculate distance to objects, to see in 3D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2018 at 12:42 AM, Sammanta said:

Yeah, I definitely know what youre talking about. It's the opposite for me - I LOVE english and writing classes, but I detest math and have absolutely no use for it in my daily routing. Every morning in math class I literally want to kill myself or break the desk. JK. But its a waste of time. 

High school just sets you up for anything and everything. Classes range from Tech to Dance to Art to Math to Science to COOKING CLASS (it exists, pathetic) to Chemistry to Calculus to Yearbook. Once highschool is over, and your freshman year of college, you can pick the classes you WANT. It'll be awesome. 

And don't worry, your career will come to you. You have time to figure it out, it's not as demanding as you think. Some people dont figure it out till 2nd year college.

When I was in high school we had to take a class called Introductory Physical Science as Freshmen. I remember a classmate complaining that they'd never need to know this stuff in "real life".  

Only the thing is, that even back then, were living in world in which was more and more relying on science and technology.    For example, at this time there was a debate about whether or not lead should be removed from gasoline.   Such a decision would be made at the governmental level, so the final decision depended who the general public elected to office.   In a contest between two candidates, each on opposite sides of this issue, and with their own arguments to support their case,  how do you decide which one is right and should get your vote if you don't even have a basic understanding of the science behind the issue?   The world has only gotten more complex since then.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now