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Ancient Greek Inventions/Discoveries Still Used Today

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What are some Ancient Greek Inventions still been used Today?

For Inventions, I know of; Alarm Clock and Windmill

For Discoveries I know that

- The Olympics were discovered by the Ancient Greeks

- They set the tone for modern philosophy 

- Many science discoveries and theorems also stem from Ancient Greece.

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Edited by Phi for All
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Oh, its an ancient debate, were the Olympics invented or discovered.

Oh no, hang on ... that was mathematics.

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13 hours ago, Strange said:

Oh, its an ancient debate, were the Olympics invented or discovered.

Oh no, hang on ... that was mathematics.

I thought it was Trump's integrity. I've always come down on the side of "invented".

As to the OP, with a nod to Strange's second line, we certainly use Euclidean geometry every day. Also, the Archimedes screw. I'm sure there are many more.

 

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I've always been fascinated by the approach of the ancient Greeks-- Their top tinkers were truly philosophers, but not scientists.  That is, they developed their ideas by thought and reasoning (such as Geometry) but did very little experimentation-- no scientific method.  Aristotle, if I recall correctly, had some very interesting thoughts on motion, but never verified by experiment (and he was wrong).

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Greek inventions:

Hydraulic wheel 

Cement 

Analog computer

Odometer 

Umbrella 

Cranes

Papanicolaou test

Alarm clock 

Sieve of Eratosthenes

Catapult 

Cartography 

Automatic door

Archimedes’ Screw aka "screwdriver"

Basic Medicine 

Concept of democracy 

Coined money 

Basic heating (not like how the Romans did it thou)

Anchor 

------------------------------------------------ 

My own personal favorites: (For fun) 

Plato invention of Socrates 

Aristotle imagination 

Greeks inventions of Gods/Demons 

Invention of miliarty Sparta 

Greek astronomy 

Normalised homosexuality 

Invention of the word "Eureka"

Invention of Hydrostatics 

Law courts 

 

Edited by Baron d'Holbach

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7 hours ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

 

------------------------------------------------ 

My own personal favorites: (For fun) 

Plato invention of Socrates 

Aristotle imagination 

Greeks inventions of Gods/Demons 

Invention of miliarty Sparta 

Greek astronomy 

Normalised homosexuality 

Invention of the word "Eureka"

Invention of Hydrostatics 

Law courts 

 

There is enough contentious material here for several threads, but not much science.

Interesting that people have listed a great many things, but nobody has mentioned two of the most culturally significant inventions: rhetoric and drama (both comedy and tragedy)

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1 hour ago, DrKrettin said:

Interesting that people have listed a great many things, but nobody has mentioned two of the most culturally significant inventions: rhetoric and drama (both comedy and tragedy)

I doubt that can be attributed to the Greeks. They appear to be the oldest civilisation that we know of who practised these arts, but I am confident the courtiers in Ur used the same rhetorical skills as the Athenians and precocious hunters amused their fellows around the campfire with playlets several millenia before that. The most we could credit the Greeks with is formalising and refining the practices.

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1 minute ago, Area54 said:

I doubt that can be attributed to the Greeks. They appear to be the oldest civilisation that we know of who practised these arts, but I am confident the courtiers in Ur used the same rhetorical skills as the Athenians and precocious hunters amused their fellows around the campfire with playlets several millenia before that. The most we could credit the Greeks with is formalising and refining the practices.

How on Earth can you be confident about something for which there is no evidence whatsoever? Wait - are you a Christian?

Jewish and Babylonian priests of the Hellenistic period were shocked by Greek rhetoric, because they had no cultural affinity with it. Glassman in his Origins of Democracy states that speeches in Sumeria were far more direct, and argues that Greek rhetoric is a result of the democracy where people had to learn to defend themselves. The Sumerian culture had a priest caste which had control of all governmental administration, so rhetoric was not an issue. Having said that, it is a conclusion based on very little evidence.

 

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Just now, DrKrettin said:

How on Earth can you be confident about something for which there is no evidence whatsoever? Wait - are you a Christian?

I'll be happy to provide a response when you drop the insults and aggressive posturing.

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1 minute ago, Area54 said:

I'll be happy to provide a response when you drop the insults and aggressive posturing.

That was meant tongue-in-cheek - which part did you take as an insult?

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Just now, DrKrettin said:

That was meant tongue-in-cheek - which part did you take as an insult?

The use of an absolute statement where arguably, and ironically, you cannot be sure one applies, is an insult to the use of logical argument.

The implication that I am a Christian was deeply offensive to all Christians. (I've already received extensive hate mail, claiming I put you up to it.)

I'll respond, in detail, to your argument after I complete the appropriate research. [It may take six months. I intend it to be definitive.]

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2 minutes ago, Area54 said:

The use of an absolute statement where arguably, and ironically, you cannot be sure one applies, is an insult to the use of logical argument.

The implication that I am a Christian was deeply offensive to all Christians. (I've already received extensive hate mail, claiming I put you up to it.)

I'll respond, in detail, to your argument after I complete the appropriate research. [It may take six months. I intend it to be definitive.]

You've lost me here. Where did I use an absolute statement? The only one I see is where you are confident about something, and I challenged it. And this was less than half an hour ago - how did you manage to get extensive hate mail in that time?

I merely asked you if you were a Christian - I don't see how that could be offensive to you or anybody else. There is a background here which I am unaware of, so if you'd like to explain, I'd be interested. 

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I missed your tongue in cheek and it seems you missed my reciprocation.

However, your absolute statement was there: How on Earth can you be confident about something for which there is no evidence whatsoever?

(I was being completely direct, however, in regard to the reply I shall work on.)

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Just now, Area54 said:

However, your absolute statement was there: How on Earth can you be confident about something for which there is no evidence whatsoever?

(I was being completely direct, however, in regard to the reply I shall work on.)

Yes, true - that was indeed an absolute statement. It is a general principle in Classics research that you assume there is no evidence unless there is indeed something which is clearly evidence. It is perfectly acceptable to claim there is no evidence and then expect people to contradict you: this is a normal procedure in academic papers anyway.

I look forward to hearing your evidence....

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7 hours ago, DrKrettin said:

There is enough contentious material here for several threads, but not much science.

Interesting that people have listed a great many things, but nobody has mentioned two of the most culturally significant inventions: rhetoric and drama (both comedy and tragedy)

That last list was for fun. Of course it's not scientific. You did read the fun part right?

And also rhetoric and drama and comedy and tragedy can easily be label next to my personal favorites.

Plato invention of Socrates - Well this could be classified as rhetoric and comedy 

And 

Greeks inventions of Gods/Demons - this can be classified as drama and tragedy 

Sorry bud I pretty much listed everything :)

Cheers 

P.S. now don't start the insulting wars for no reason :P

 

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18 minutes ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

Plato invention of Socrates - Well this could be classified as rhetoric and comedy 

 

So what is your argument that Plato invented Socrates? 

 

(yes, I got the fun bit)

20 minutes ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

Greeks inventions of Gods/Demons - this can be classified as drama and tragedy 

 

There were Gods before the Greeks, and afterwards. 

21 minutes ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

Sorry bud I pretty much listed everything :)

 

Actually, you have only scratched the surface. :)

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Socrates is a mix bag of everything. He resembles Jesus without any divine abilities. A teacher/philosopher/poet and mentor. Never wrote a single word on paper and taught many and was prosecuted for his belief. Just like Jesus, Socrates death and philosophy inspire his pupils to follow and write stories about him afterwards.  

Maybe the argument could be he was just like Mohammad or Homer a illiterate individual who others wrote wonders about. Or those individuals are the real authors of their figment of imagination to create a hero / antitype. 

Plato was a proflic profound remarkable writer. It's easy to say of course it was him. Penmanship like Plato could of easily wrote about a person name Socrates. 

Out of everyone in Athens only 2 people met Socrates? Plato and Xenophon. Come on this is a little weird now... at least Jesus had more than that.

and than the usual suspects plays in. Every time some one tries to describe him or talk about him, contradiction happens. Cough cough Jesus. 

and what's weird is why did Socrates die? What did he die For? The answer is for his beliefs? Well Plato documented on paper his beliefs. Why didn't Plato get hang or poison. 

 

next topic..............

Of course there were gods before the Greeks.

The argument was the Greeks story telling and creations of them. The inventions of hundreds of demons and gods and hero's was on a whole different level compare to the Egyptians or Sumerians. 

 

and yes I only scratches the surface. If this was about the Phoenicians or akkadian or old and new Egypt and Sumerian and India it will take forever to write everything. 

Each country and empire I name could easily be about 500 pages of information of inventions and discoveries 

My goodness the Romans alone 10,000 pages can be written on them and still we be at 75% there. 

So yes. 

Again I pretty much listed in a common sense way here on this page everything an average Joe needs to write a 2 page report on ancient Greek. 

 

So yea i emphasis, I pretty much wrote everything a school assignment paper needs 

 

Cheers :P

 

 

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7 hours ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

Maybe the argument could be he was just like Mohammad or Homer a illiterate individual who others wrote wonders about. Or those individuals are the real authors of their figment of imagination to create a hero / antitype. 

I like this a lot. Very intuitive.

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24 minutes ago, Rinocerberus said:

I like this a lot. Very intuitive.

Which is often code for "wild assed guess". :)

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8 hours ago, Baron d'Holbach said:

Socrates is a mix bag of everything. He resembles Jesus without any divine abilities. A teacher/philosopher/poet and mentor. Never wrote a single word on paper and taught many and was prosecuted for his belief. Just like Jesus, Socrates death and philosophy inspire his pupils to follow and write stories about him afterwards.  

Maybe the argument could be he was just like Mohammad or Homer a illiterate individual who others wrote wonders about. Or those individuals are the real authors of their figment of imagination to create a hero / antitype. 

Plato was a proflic profound remarkable writer. It's easy to say of course it was him. Penmanship like Plato could of easily wrote about a person name Socrates. 

Out of everyone in Athens only 2 people met Socrates? Plato and Xenophon. Come on this is a little weird now... at least Jesus had more than that.

and than the usual suspects plays in. Every time some one tries to describe him or talk about him, contradiction happens. Cough cough Jesus. 

and what's weird is why did Socrates die? What did he die For? The answer is for his beliefs? Well Plato documented on paper his beliefs. Why didn't Plato get hang or poison. 

 

 

Ultimately you cannot prove that an individual actually existed 2500 years ago, all you have is the documented evidence. In the case of Socrates, the evidence is so convincing that there seems to me no reason at all for guessing that he is a figment of Plato's imagination. Evidence is to be found in  Plato and Xenophon, but also in Aristophanes, all three claiming to have known Socrates personally. These three were not part of a religious sect with an agenda to invent a saviour, they were three unrelated Athenian citizens. Why would they have invented somebody? All three paint portraits of him which are not totally consistent with each other, but he was clearly a figure difficult to describe. Further evidence of his actual existence comes from sources describing his circle of friends including some who turned away from democracy (Critias, Charmides, Alcibiades) and this may have been the reason for his trial, or at least one of the reasons. Plato's Apology also makes reference to other characters who are considered to have existed, and who would have been alive at the time he wrote it. In his poetics, Aristotle classifies his dialogues with others as a species of fiction in their own right. Fragments survive of dialogues with Antisthenes, Aeschines of Sphettus and Phaedon of Elis. We know the names of his father, mother and wife. For me, the evidence that he existed is overwhelming.

Edited by DrKrettin

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4 hours ago, DrKrettin said:

Ultimately you cannot prove that an individual actually existed 2500 years ago, all you have is the documented evidence. In the case of Socrates, the evidence is so convincing that there seems to me no reason at all for guessing that he is a figment of Plato's imagination. Evidence is to be found in  Plato and Xenophon, but also in Aristophanes, all three claiming to have known Socrates personally. These three were not part of a religious sect with an agenda to invent a saviour, they were three unrelated Athenian citizens. Why would they have invented somebody? All three paint portraits of him which are not totally consistent with each other, but he was clearly a figure difficult to describe. Further evidence of his actual existence comes from sources describing his circle of friends including some who turned away from democracy (Critias, Charmides, Alcibiades) and this may have been the reason for his trial, or at least one of the reasons. Plato's Apology also makes reference to other characters who are considered to have existed, and who would have been alive at the time he wrote it. In his poetics, Aristotle classifies his dialogues with others as a species of fiction in their own right. Fragments survive of dialogues with Antisthenes, Aeschines of Sphettus and Phaedon of Elis. We know the names of his father, mother and wife. For me, the evidence that he existed is overwhelming.

Indeed +1, but the baron has a different agenda...

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1 hour ago, dimreepr said:

Indeed +1, but the baron has a different agenda...

Hahaha. No I do not have an agenda.

He asked.

I wrote for fun about it. He asked me an argument on it and I wrote a response. 

I didn't want him guessing why the heck I said that and ran away without any feedback 

Edited by Baron d'Holbach

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On 8/24/2017 at 5:23 AM, Baron d'Holbach said:

Greek inventions:

Invention of the word "Eureka"

 

I've just remembered that I wanted to comment on this. It is a perfectly usual word (attested 130 times, twice in the bible) which is the 1st sing. active perfect indicative of the verb eurisko to discover, find out. So it means "I have discovered (it)" and was (probably) pronounced HOO-re-ka. This is in stark contrast to the present-day attempt of yoo-REE-ka

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