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Trekkie_4_Life_69

Chemistry Books for high school students!

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Moderator Note

Moved to Chemistry for a more comprehensive response.

 

And welcome to SFN!

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!

Moderator Note

Moved to Chemistry for a more comprehensive response.

 

And welcome to SFN!

Thank You. Happy to be here!

Edited by Trekkie_4_Life_69

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here are some

Chemistry the center of science by Theodore E.Brown

Chemistry by Kenneth W. Whitten

Chemistry by Raymond Chang

General Chemistry by Darrell Ebbing

I often use them.

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I'm sure there are many, but here are two that might be useful. Both cover a very wide scope and introduce all the main areas of chemistry, explaining what they mean and providing the necessary background information to progress in each.

 

'Chemistry' by Lewis and Evans.

 

This book has an associated website and is claimed to be (I agree) suitable for "Chemistry students, particular those without a strong mathematical or chemistry background"

 

This book is somewhere between GCSE and A level in standard.

 

***********************************

 

General Chemistry by Petrucci

 

This is a larger, heavier book than Lewis and Evans and contains more detail that would get you through A level from first principles.

 

go well

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Being in highschool doesn't necessarily mean you need a highschool level textbook. It all depends on how interested you are, and how much time you will spend studying from it. If you already took a chemistry course and were so interested that you wanted to learn more, I would recommend a college level textbook.

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IDK about books, but this site has on-line lessons: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry

 

Check Wikipedia, too.

Thank you, sir.

 

here are some

Chemistry the center of science by Theodore E.Brown

Chemistry by Kenneth W. Whitten

Chemistry by Raymond Chang

General Chemistry by Darrell Ebbing

I often use them.

Thanks

 

Being in highschool doesn't necessarily mean you need a highschool level textbook. It all depends on how interested you are, and how much time you will spend studying from it. If you already took a chemistry course and were so interested that you wanted to learn more, I would recommend a college level textbook.

Yes this is for personal interest, and I'm very interested, thanksfor the advice Edited by Trekkie_4_Life_69

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if you are interested McMurry Organic chemistry book is very helpful on understanding basics to intermediate levels of it.

but you actually didn't ask about organic chemistry. if you like chemistry i'm sure you will fall in love with organic part.

 

another one of my favorite : but it's advanced and more organic !

Marchs Advanced Organic Chemistry Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure

Michael B. Smith, Jerry March

 

enjoy reading ! don't forget practicals :)

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The general chemistry texts they use for first years here are 'Chemistry' by Blackman and formerly, a book of the same name by Zumdahl and Zumdahl. I've not have much experience with the Zumdahl book, but Blackman does a fairly good job of covering the basics. There is also, 'General Chemistry,' by Linus Pauling, which is a wonderful book, albeit it slightly outdated.

 

I would probably avoid books targeted at high school students. In my experience, these books tend to lack in a lot of areas and though they may do an okay job at explaining things simply, they often do so at the cost of ingrained misinformation. It will do you no favors if you choose to continue with chemistry after high school, as unlearning bad habits can be quite difficult.

 

If you're after more specialized books, the McMurry one mentioned a few posts up is nice, though I'd prefer 'Organic Chemistry,' by Clayden over that any day of the week. 'Inorganic Chemistry,' by Shriver and Atkins is nice, though not terribly in depth in some places. I have no experience with phys chem texts.

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