Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
blike

If gravity is faster than light..

Recommended Posts

If gravity travels faster than light, couldn't it be used to send information at superluminal speeds? By measuring gravitational effect, can't you calculate mass of the object and its relative motion?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was published in a non-prestigous journal, was accurate only within 25%, and has already been harshly criticized. According to some experts they mistakenly measured the speed of light instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wouldn't GR just fall apart though? I thought it was one of Einstein's most basic assumptions that he had to make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yup. But we don't yet have much control over gravity.

 

Well, the point wasn't really that someday we could harness this potential...

 

I thought information at >c speeds was a big no no..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

R:alpha::beta:-(1/2)g:alpha::beta:R+:lambda:g:alpha::beta: = ((8:pi::kappa: )/c2)*T:alpha::beta:

 

(Einstein's field equation)

 

Look that over, I'll explain more later, late for class :)

 

also need to get a better symbol set, any ideas where?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well first of all, consider the constants in the expression:

 

:kappa: is the gravitational constant; 6.67259x10−11m3kg-1s−2

 

:alpha: is the fine structure constant, ~7.2993x10-3

 

:pi: of course is 3.14159...

 

and c is (currently) 2.99792458x108 m/s

 

 

 

I'll let you all work on it for a while now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is the gravitational constant; 6.67259x10−11m3kg-1s−2

 

I thought that was Boltzmann's constant (they look so much alike). How do you tell them apart? I've seen B's constant written that way too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

boltzman's constant wouldn't be abbreviated with a g...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by fafalone

also need to get a better symbol set, any ideas where?

 

you could make a load of vbcode tags for MathML i suppose. although you need mozilla or a special plugin for IE, it does make symbols (and indeed the math) look nice :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest HYavel

I think gravity could be the result of faster than light forces. Read "The circulating Universe, A new Dynamic"

on this forum..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Don

That of which gravity is the result is not known. There are several theories. The most obvious is that gravity is an attribute of the elemental particles. That theory is out of favor because it involves action at a distance and explanation by definition. Under that theory gravity is eternal as is its host particle. If the particle moves so does its gravity, instantaneously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gravity is effectively affected as mass comes "into being"...apply a "bias" somewhere, and "SEE" how gravity "acts", ( being a "Weak" force, gravity is easily manipulated). ... When worlds are formed, bais are applied and Gravity , having allready been there, (for gravity is infinitely "faster" than light) "gives way to mass". ...(mass affects and effects gravity). Where a bias is applied, gravity is manipulated...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gravity is effectively affected as mass comes "into being"...apply a "bias" somewhere, and "SEE" how gravity "acts", ( being a "Weak" force, gravity is easily manipulated). ... When worlds are formed, bais are applied and Gravity , having allready been there, (for gravity is infinitely "faster" than light) "gives way to mass". ...(mass affects and effects gravity). Where a bias is applied, gravity is manipulated...

 

 

There is another "thread" on this, where it is "explained" that gravity is not "faster" than light. Plus, you need to "define" your terms to have them "make sense."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What was wrong with typing [math]R_{\alpha \beta}-\frac{1}{2}g_{\alpha \beta}R+\lambda g_{\alpha \beta} = \frac{8 \pi \kappa}{c^2} T_{\alpha \beta}[/math]?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hasn't there been more than one experiment to determine that gravity does indeed seem to propegate at c? One was observing the collapse of a binary neutron star system, I dont remember what the other one was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What was wrong with typing [math]R_{\alpha \beta}-\frac{1}{2}g_{\alpha \beta}R+\lambda g_{\alpha \beta} = \frac{8 \pi \kappa}{c^2} T_{\alpha \beta}[/math']?

we didn't have [math]\LaTeX[/math] at the point, i think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'']Hasn't there been more than one experiment to determine that gravity does indeed seem to propegate at c? One was observing the collapse of a binary neutron star system, I dont remember what the other one was.

 

Yes, mentioned in the other thread(s) about the subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that massless particles could move at, but not above the speed of light, and gravitons (if they do exist), could move at the speed of light, but not fasted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rosemary:

 

You are correct assuming that gravitons have a rest mass of 0. This is a fairly safe assumption, if gravitons exist they must have specific properties, a rest mass of 0 is one of these properties.

 

So yes, your "thought" was correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.