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Airbrush

Weather in your hometown (split from Climate change and global warming)

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On the subject of Climate Change I was wondering how some others notice different weather in their hometowns?

I have been living in Southern California, in the hot San Fernando Valley, for 25 years.  This summer is strange, there has been only one real hot day of plus 100F degree heat.  We are past the middle of June and the weather every day is cool, in the low 80s on the hottest day, usually overcast in the mornings, even into the afternoons, in the 60s or 70s, cool compared to the hot, hot summers that are usual for this area.  Very nice weather.

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Weather is not climate, and it can be cooler in some areas and yet the overall temperature in the world can be (and is) going up.  

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I think that's a North American weather effect, Airbrush.
Even up here in Canada, spring has been abnormally cool and wet.

Might only have to run the AC one or two months this year.

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While here, in the Pacific Northwest, we broke records last week with a couple of days with temps in the high 90s.  The general trend I've seen in the last few years is towards a longer "dry" season,  The spring rains tend to not be as much ( we just had one of our driest Mays) and the fall rains don't really start until later.   The result is the increase in wildfires.   I've lived in Portland for 30 yrs,  And it is only during the last three that we've had to deal with smoke from wildfires (and with that I'm not including the Eagle Creek fire from a couple of years ago which was quite close, and could be considered a one-off event,  but smoke from wildfires quite a distance away that is extensive enough to effect us here.)

 

P.S. And just a little over one year after I posted this, we are in the Middle of another "one-off" event.  Hot/dry/strong East winds over the last few days have stoked a number of wildfires which have caused a great deal of damage to towns and evacuations.  Right now the air quality due to fires to the South East of us has driven air quality down to being the worst in the world right now.

At least the East winds have quit and while there are still Evacuation warnings in effect, (right now I have a niece at a level 2 evacuation notice) they don't expect the fires to continue their march towards heavily populated areas.  We might have "turned the corner" with a shift to lighter Westerly winds. Air quality is expected to be still bad through the weekend and then improve as we might even get some light showers to scour the smoke out.

This was the view from a street not too far from me yesterday, and things haven't changed much since then.  Still a strong smoke smell to the air outside, and I noticed some ash on the windshield of the car under the carport this AM while taking out some stuff to the recycling bin. ( not as big as the flakes falling from the sky during the Eagle Creek fire I mentioned Earlier, But still visibly noticeable.)

 

Smkstrt.jpg

Edited by Janus
Update

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We've been seeing similarly cooler summer days in my part of Northern Nevada.  But-- to my view it seems to correlate to global warming.  What has happened is that the past couple of winters, especially this last one, have been much warmer.  9 years ago, when we moved here in retirement, we hit nightime lows of -25 F on several occasions, and had snow.  This past winter we rarely dropped lower than +10 F, and had very little snow.  Instead, we had lots of rain, and the rain continued into the spring.  Now we have groundwater at the surface, and frequently the evaporation builds unseasonal cloud cover-- so we are seeing slightly cooler days than normal for the summer.  To my relatively untrained eye it looks to me like the overall warming (and associated evaporation) is bringing more moisture to the high desert and the effect of that moisture is to moderate the extremes-- giving warmer winter/cooler summer.

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Less winter frosts here are getting hard to ignore -  the longer term average is (was) about 40 frosty mornings a year and we have been getting fewer than 10 over recent winters, 2 so far this winter. Highly variable from year to year but when winter temperatures - both minimums and maximums - are breaking records in an upward direction it is hard to ignore. Those extra cold mornings, with a 'hard' frost are becoming quite rare. This has real significance; frost vulnerable perennial weeds that were previously held in check are becoming rampant, adding a burden of time and costs for weed control. Winter heatwaves - not necessarily 'hot' but much warmer than usual - have limited the opportunities for safe cool weather hazard reduction fires through the past several winters; burning off grass and leaf litter in order to reduce hot season fire intensity is becoming more difficult to do without risk of escaping past firebreaks. It used to be common to have cool overnight conditions slow and stop fires. Now we cannot rely on that and must be more vigilant and have more equipment and manpower to do the same job.

Edited by Ken Fabian

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Here in Rio de Janeiro we get the first 40 C 104F Winter, and the raining cicles are geting more harder and longer. Usualy take two dry days to rain, now is almost a week  of low umidity to rain.

In center-west take half year to to rain again, nort is burning, south is snowing and nort-east is a drougth/flood. All this is normal, but not in this time and all the same time

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I live in Holland, a small country in W-Europe.

Last august we had worst heatwave since ever.

 

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The weather station is forecasting smoke for the next few days.  I live almost 3000 miles from the fires on the west coast of the US.  The smoke looks like a thin cover of cirrus clouds that have an orange tint, no smoke at ground level.

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2 hours ago, Bufofrog said:

The weather station is forecasting smoke for the next few days.  I live almost 3000 miles from the fires on the west coast of the US.  The smoke looks like a thin cover of cirrus clouds that have an orange tint, no smoke at ground level.

We had bad air quality for ~ a week, staying in the "Very unhealthy" to "Hazardous" ranges.  We tried to seal things up as best we could, but the smell of smoke still found its way in. 

We were stuck in a thermal inversion that was holding the smoke near the ground. We finally broke out of it Friday, when a system finally blew in.  Had good air quality for a few days, then it jumped back up  to over 130 today again, before dropping back to under 100 this evening.

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