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barometric pressure effect on body


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#1 Athena

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 01:42 AM

Is there any knowledge of how barometric pressure effects the body, other then some "maybe it causes pain to increase"? The storm that is moving in has me so crippled I hate walking. I wouldn't call this pain, but weakness in my thigh muscles that is really uncomfortable, more like a really bad tired feeling that pain.
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#2 swansont

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 09:54 AM

There is apparently no strong scientific evidence that such a connection exists - it's mainly anecdotal. A few studies have shown an effect, while others haven't.
http://www.medicinen...rticlekey=52133

One question I have is whether people complain of pain when they fly or drive up a mountain, separate from sitting for long periods. You see similar changes in barometric pressure.
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#3 Marat

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 12:57 AM

Rheumatism and arthritis famously respond to changes in the weather, and it was common in days gone by for people to predict weather changes this way. It's probably more the result of varying moisture levels than the barometric pressure.

Patients' intraocular pressure measured by tonometry does increase during periods of the full moon, since the eye's aequeus also has its 'tides.' I don't think that changes in barometric pressure would have much effect on IOP, though.
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#4 swansont

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 09:53 AM

Rheumatism and arthritis famously respond to changes in the weather, and it was common in days gone by for people to predict weather changes this way. It's probably more the result of varying moisture levels than the barometric pressure.


Famous, but is there any scientific evidence that backs up the anecdotal evidence? Because this kind of effect is ripe for selection bias.

Patients' intraocular pressure measured by tonometry does increase during periods of the full moon, since the eye's aequeus also has its 'tides.' I don't think that changes in barometric pressure would have much effect on IOP, though.


Do you have a citation of the study that showed this? Any effect of the moon on pressure is going to be small compared to barometric pressure changes.
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#5 PhDwannabe

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Posted 2 July 2011 - 04:31 PM

It seems like this would be such a straightforward double-blind controlled experiment...
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#6 Athena

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Posted 6 July 2011 - 11:43 PM

There is apparently no strong scientific evidence that such a connection exists - it's mainly anecdotal. A few studies have shown an effect, while others haven't.
http://www.medicinen...rticlekey=52133

One question I have is whether people complain of pain when they fly or drive up a mountain, separate from sitting for long periods. You see similar changes in barometric pressure.


Hum, thank you. I will have to follow through with some research on that, using a barometer and my body. I live close to mountains, and the ocean. What a fun vacation I can have going from place to place, noting the barometric pressure and how I feel. It would be fun. :D

Marat, what is intraocular pressure and a tonometry? I think I will have to google for information, because I don't want to wait. What you said is very interesting.

One of my neighbors was in tears today, because she is doing so poorly, physically. I was shocked, because I thought I was the only one who got so down, because of physical discomfort. It seems like medicine is failing us, because our discomfort is still a mystery and we are not pleased with pain medications at all! I think I said before, steroids made me feel great! If it were as easy to buy the steroids I was given after an operation, as it is to buy cigarettes, I would probable be in trouble. It would be great to feel that good, without bad consequences. The researcher who makes the right product, will be a multi millionaire.

Marat, got my answer http://en.wikipedia....ocular_pressure At this link it say the Intraocular pressure normally decreases at night. It is possible, a full moon, on a clear night, could make a difference?

Edited by Athena, 7 July 2011 - 12:14 AM.

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#7 amanda more

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Posted 7 July 2011 - 02:27 AM

There is a real effect. Arthritics generally have some level of inflammation. My grandmother (an arthritic) made the family move to a hallway and a tornado crashed the chimney through the living room. Gas being much more compressible than liquid it makes me wonder just what the makeup of synovial fluid is about(like at knee). The ear is ok in the air generally and the ground. It is during take-offs and landings that ear pain happens. Fish have a bladder that responds to the water depth. Maybe it is a sensory response that somehow pumps fluid suddenly to areas- blood, lymph etc. Unless all the radar, internet etc. is down then the weather service isn't going to run the experiments so that they can then say, "Bring me an arthritic."
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#8 333

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Posted 4 April 2012 - 10:09 PM

I always get diagnosed with dry eye, as it feels like I have sand in them at times, at other times they are fine. But, I go to the beach where it's humid and they are still dry - sometimes, I go higher in elevation and they are fine - sometimes.....then I found something.....on days when a storm is coming and while the storm is here I am in pain and my eyes water, just prior to the storm leaving I start to feel better, and when the weather is wonderful my eyes are great. So, there must be some correlation between eyes and bormetric pressure.
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#9 John Cuthber

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Posted 5 April 2012 - 01:26 PM

Correlation <> causation.
Eyes certainly respond to humidity..
The humidity depends on the weather.
The weather depends on the pressure.
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#10 Moontanman

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Posted 5 April 2012 - 01:43 PM

I know it's anecdotal but falling barometric pressure causes me considerable pain, hurricanes are too painful to describe adequately...
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#11 Joatmon

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Posted 5 April 2012 - 01:53 PM

I know of one jet pilot who flew with a blocked eustachian tube. He was OK climbing to height but suffered pain as he descended. He had no option, because of fuel available, to continue his descent until a burst eardrum gave him some relief.


"The risk is an ear block, with possible vertigo or a ruptured ear drum. Both are very unpleasant and potentially compromise flight safety." .

See "Colds,ear blocks and hearing". in the link
http://aviationmedic...le&articleID=45

Edited by Joatmon, 5 April 2012 - 02:01 PM.

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Trying to make some sense of it all,

But I can see that it makes no sense at all


#12 hypervalent_iodine

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Posted 5 April 2012 - 04:34 PM

To add to the stockpile of anecdotes, my other half almost always gets a bad headache and sinus congestion when there's a significant change in atmospheric pressure.

A very brief search indicates there's at least some truth to it in the case of arthritis:

http://www.jrheum.or.../29/2/335.short
http://scholar.googl...2005&sciodt=0,5
http://www.sciencedi...002934306010266
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#13 Athena

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 02:55 AM

To add to the stockpile of anecdotes, my other half almost always gets a bad headache and sinus congestion when there's a significant change in atmospheric pressure.

A very brief search indicates there's at least some truth to it in the case of arthritis:

http://www.jrheum.or.../29/2/335.short
http://scholar.googl...2005&sciodt=0,5
http://www.sciencedi...002934306010266


Thanks Hyper, that is enough evidence to convince me, because I know I have really bad days, and something has to cause the trouble. Just cold rainy days don't seem so bad, and where I live there are many of those. But sever storms often come with so much pain, it is hard to ignore.

I should perhaps keep my own note book and get a barometer and pay attention to daily weather reports. You all have given me enough information for me to believe it would not be a waste of my time.
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