Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Just an idea about AIDS cure.


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 AnmolSingh

AnmolSingh

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:42 PM

I was just thinking about how to avoid death in AIDS.... I thought of an idea....we know that ADA can be treated by using recombinant DNA techniques..... so what if we go to the sourse of the production of leucocytes... the bone marrow.... can't we make artificial bone marrow with recombinant DNA..... using the same technique can't we transfer the function of T-lymphocyte and neutrophil(which is 60-65% of wbc's ) and then do a bone marrow transfer as done in leukaemia....of the artificially made bone marrow... so even though our T helper cells die... our antibodies keep on producing lowering the risk of other diseases..and thus avoiding death maybe....it's just an idea. I don't know that if there is enough technology to do it. Or if we can try to just change the glycoprotein I.e CD of our T-lymphocyte so that HIV can't cause any infection ?
  • 0

#2 NimrodTheGoat

NimrodTheGoat

    Meson

  • Senior Members
  • 77 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:59 PM

Celibacy?


  • -1

smash that like button, or i'll smash you


#3 StringJunky

StringJunky

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 6,272 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:08 PM

Celibacy?

?


  • 0

 Education, like life, is a journey not a destination


#4 Function

Function

    Protist

  • Senior Members
  • 817 posts
  • LocationBelgium

Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:14 PM

I was just thinking about how to avoid death in AIDS.... I thought of an idea....we know that ADA can be treated by using recombinant DNA techniques..... so what if we go to the sourse of the production of leucocytes... the bone marrow.... can't we make artificial bone marrow with recombinant DNA..... using the same technique can't we transfer the function of T-lymphocyte and neutrophil(which is 60-65% of wbc's ) and then do a bone marrow transfer as done in leukaemia....of the artificially made bone marrow... so even though our T helper cells die... our antibodies keep on producing lowering the risk of other diseases..and thus avoiding death maybe....it's just an idea. I don't know that if there is enough technology to do it. Or if we can try to just change the glycoprotein I.e CD of our T-lymphocyte so that HIV can't cause any infection ?

 

We can't change the CD4 (which I guess you are aiming at) in our T lympho's, since then they simply won't work as desired anymore.

 

The way HIV infects and destroys CD4-positive T-lymphocytes is by their CCR5-receptor.

 

If you find a way to modify T-cell stem cells to lose their CCR5, be my guest. Fun fact: around 1% of the total population is naturally CCR5-negative, so they won't be able to develop aids from HIV.


  • 0

So I guess we are who we are for a lot of reasons. And maybe we'll never know most of them.

But even if we don't have the power to choose where we come from, we can still choose where we go from there.

We can still do things. And we can try to feel okay about them.

 

– Steven Chobsky in The Perks of Being a Wallflower


#5 AnmolSingh

AnmolSingh

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:15 PM

Celibacy is to prevent..... I am expressing about an idea to prevent death by AIDS. Thank you for replies.

Edited by AnmolSingh, 19 May 2017 - 09:15 PM.

  • 0

#6 StringJunky

StringJunky

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 6,272 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:30 PM

 

We can't change the CD4 (which I guess you are aiming at) in our T lympho's, since then they simply won't work as desired anymore.

 

The way HIV infects and destroys CD4-positive T-lymphocytes is by their CCR5-receptor.

 

If you find a way to modify T-cell stem cells to lose their CCR5, be my guest. Fun fact: around 1% of the total population is naturally CCR5-negative, so they won't be able to develop aids from HIV.

Does that mean they are immune to all pathological effects from hiv?


  • 0

 Education, like life, is a journey not a destination


#7 AnmolSingh

AnmolSingh

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:03 PM

 
We can't change the CD4 (which I guess you are aiming at) in our T lympho's, since then they simply won't work as desired anymore.
 
The way HIV infects and destroys CD4-positive T-lymphocytes is by their CCR5-receptor.
 
If you find a way to modify T-cell stem cells to lose their CCR5, be my guest. Fun fact: around 1% of the total population is naturally CCR5-negative, so they won't be able to develop aids from HIV.


Hmm... I didn't knew that.. thanks for telling.. so why is AIDS considered dangerous.... also what about the artificial bone marrow idea?
  • 0

#8 Raider5678

Raider5678

    Organism

  • Senior Members
  • 1,124 posts
  • LocationPennslyvania

Posted 20 May 2017 - 02:04 AM

so why is AIDS considered dangerous..

Because it weakens your immune system and allows opportunistic viruses to kill you.


  • 0

"My good sir,

I feel the need to inform you that your argument has reached rock bottom and has proceeded to dig.

 Good day."


#9 AnmolSingh

AnmolSingh

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 20 May 2017 - 03:51 AM

Because it weakens your immune system and allows opportunistic viruses to kill you.

I am talking about the dangerous term as related to CD... the fact he told ...according to which the cure of AIDS is naturally present in 1% of human population and thus help a lot ....... so if we can study their genomics.... we can cure it...maybe?

Edited by AnmolSingh, 20 May 2017 - 03:54 AM.

  • 0

#10 Endy0816

Endy0816

    Primate

  • Senior Members
  • 2,052 posts
  • LocationOrlando

Posted 20 May 2017 - 04:19 AM

More resistant, but companies have looked into this and developed treatments based on it.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CCR5#HIV

 

 

I think I read HIV is more manageable now than in the past. Still could use a true cure though.


  • 0

#11 StringJunky

StringJunky

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 6,272 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 20 May 2017 - 06:22 AM

More resistant, but companies have looked into this and developed treatments based on it.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CCR5#HIV

 

 

I think I read HIV is more manageable now than in the past. Still could use a true cure though.

Don't  ask for a citation but it was quite recently, whilst looking stuff upon hep c, I read the typical proportion of years of life lost is now about 10%. 6 or 7 years. it's near parity with uninfected people. for those undergoing treatment. 


  • 0

 Education, like life, is a journey not a destination


#12 Sensei

Sensei

    Scientist

  • Senior Members
  • 3,239 posts

Posted 27 May 2017 - 12:06 PM

We can't change the CD4 (which I guess you are aiming at) in our T lympho's, since then they simply won't work as desired anymore.
 
The way HIV infects and destroys CD4-positive T-lymphocytes is by their CCR5-receptor.
 
If you find a way to modify T-cell stem cells to lose their CCR5, be my guest. Fun fact: around 1% of the total population is naturally CCR5-negative, so they won't be able to develop aids from HIV.


How about making "fake modified T-cells", which have CCR5, like original one, but everything else in them is disabled.
So once they are introduced to human body (drip), they are capturing majority of viruses from blood.
Later they can be identified by unique part on surface (due to modification), and expelled from human body.

Edited by Sensei, 27 May 2017 - 12:08 PM.

  • 0

#13 Function

Function

    Protist

  • Senior Members
  • 817 posts
  • LocationBelgium

Posted 27 May 2017 - 12:38 PM

How about making "fake modified T-cells", which have CCR5, like original one, but everything else in them is disabled.
So once they are introduced to human body (drip), they are capturing majority of viruses from blood.
Later they can be identified by unique part on surface (due to modification), and expelled from human body.

 

Not possible: the virus will replicate incredibly fast, whether it be real or bait T-lympho's (BTL). How were you planning on extracting each and every BTL from the body without even leaving one infected one?

 

Moreover, the virus will still bind to CCR5's on regular, real T-lympho's, there's no way in directing the virus towards the BTLs, unless you would inject more BTLs than we would have regular T-lymho's, and have thousands, if not millions of CCR5s be expressed on their cell surface.


  • 0

So I guess we are who we are for a lot of reasons. And maybe we'll never know most of them.

But even if we don't have the power to choose where we come from, we can still choose where we go from there.

We can still do things. And we can try to feel okay about them.

 

– Steven Chobsky in The Perks of Being a Wallflower





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users