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Ideas for a side game to play on SFN.

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I have been kicking around an idea for a side game to play here at the forum using the profile update feature, I thought it could work using the members posts in a thread in some way.

 

At first I imagined a "six degrees of separation" sort of arrangement. But it would probably zero in on some key member who is somehow linked to every member and post in some easily defined chain of associations. Hmmm . . . . who could that be I wonder? ^_^

 

Now I'm thinking some kind of poker hand. We give each moderator and expert a face card I.D. and . . . . . .na bad Idea.

 

OK, I give up any suggestions? :)

 

 

 

 

 

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Somebody ideate a number.

Other players have to find out what is this number.

Player post his number and original author can answer only "higher", "lower" or "equal" - game is done and we know winner.

To not cheat original author has to make photo of his number with monitor in background open with SFN thread visible so we can verify date.

 

If allowed number is between 0...1000 number should be found after just 9-10 answers, if you know proper algorithm how to play it ;)

Edited by Sensei

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I noticed on another forum, They play guess what this is, and post varying items and views, and any one can have a guess.

 

without using google search for this image, Some people post pictures from their homes which they have taken themselves, or pictures they have came across.

 

SlowWormSkin_DominicGreves.jpg

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Image is named "SlowWormSkin_DominicGreves.jpg" :D

Edited by Sensei

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Well done :) I was unsure how to move "inspect element" or change element name,

But still an idea, perhaps famous people?

 

easy one here.

 

 

post-79233-0-21717600-1401998043_thumb.png

 

 

or this one?

post-79233-0-98923100-1402000781_thumb.png

 

Edited by sunshaker

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Einstein, and no clue...

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post-79233-0-81883300-1402003363_thumb.jpgCorrect on top one "Einstein",

 

 

 

Washington & Lincoln?

Wrong, but i thought it looked like lincoln :)

Edited by sunshaker

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Second one looks like it could be an iconic pic of Darwin

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Second one looks like it could be an iconic pic of Darwin

Wrong,

 

He was not a scientist, But had an interest in science.

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All good ideas! I'm still thinking about something using the profile update. Does anyone know of any simple word games that would work like maybe a jumbled word game or even those wheel of fortune phrases, person, place or thing type of game.

 

How about you post a scientific related category - a person, place or thing with a association to science.

 

Then give a clue. Example: Person - place of birth is a funny name.

 

Follow up as soon as you can with another clue if needed or a congratulation.

 

Second clue: Was an apprentice to a bookbinder.

 

Keep going until someone guesses correctly. We may need to have a set minimum of information, maybe even place of birth, early education and something regarding character. Example: Person - place of birth is a funny name. Was an apprentice for seven years to a bookbinder. Refused a knighthood.

 

 

And please remember I am most probably not as smart as you so don't make them too hard. ^_^

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Guess who, pic 2, Salvador dali.

 

post-79233-0-18913100-1402138596_thumb.jpg

 

  • Salvador Dali was born on 11th May 1904 in Figueres, Spain.
  • His brother, also called Salvador, had died nine months before Dali was born. Dali, encouraged by his parents, believed he was the reincarnation of his brother, and this theme is sometimes featured in his work.
  • Salvador went to drawing school and the first exhibition of his work (a series of charcoal drawings) took place in 1917 (organised by his father).
  • Dali’s mother died in 1921 of breast cancer. Dali was just sixteen and was severely affected by his mother’s passing.
  • Dali moved to Madrid to study at the School of Fine Arts. He experimented withCubism, and also gained a reputation for being a bit eccentric.
  • He was expelled from the School of Fine Arts for his role in causing ‘an unrest’, and he visited Paris, meeting Pablo Picasso.
  • Dali joined the Surrealist group in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris.
  • He painted The Persistence of Memory, one his most famous works, in 1931. It features the classic surrealist image of the melting clock.
  • Dali and his wife, Gala, moved to America to escape World War 2. They lived there for eight years.
  • He returned to Paris after WW2 and began to experiment with other forms and different techniques. He used optical illusions and visual puns, and he became interested in mathematics and science – particularly the structure of DNA.
  • Dali designed the Chupa Chups logo.
  • Dali died of heart failure on 23rd January 1989. He was 84.
  • Several images often appear in Dali’s surrealist paintings. These include: melting clocks, elephants, eggs, ants, snails and locusts.
  • Salvador Dali produced more than 1500 paintings in his lifetime. He also created numerous drawings, illustrations, sculptures, short films, books and lithographs.

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Guess who, pic 2, Salvador dali.

 

attachicon.gifsalvador dali.jpg

 

  • Salvador Dali was born on 11th May 1904 in Figueres, Spain.
  • His brother, also called Salvador, had died nine months before Dali was born. Dali, encouraged by his parents, believed he was the reincarnation of his brother, and this theme is sometimes featured in his work.
  • Salvador went to drawing school and the first exhibition of his work (a series of charcoal drawings) took place in 1917 (organised by his father).
  • Dali’s mother died in 1921 of breast cancer. Dali was just sixteen and was severely affected by his mother’s passing.
  • Dali moved to Madrid to study at the School of Fine Arts. He experimented withCubism, and also gained a reputation for being a bit eccentric.
  • He was expelled from the School of Fine Arts for his role in causing ‘an unrest’, and he visited Paris, meeting Pablo Picasso.
  • Dali joined the Surrealist group in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris.
  • He painted The Persistence of Memory, one his most famous works, in 1931. It features the classic surrealist image of the melting clock.
  • Dali and his wife, Gala, moved to America to escape World War 2. They lived there for eight years.
  • He returned to Paris after WW2 and began to experiment with other forms and different techniques. He used optical illusions and visual puns, and he became interested in mathematics and science – particularly the structure of DNA.
  • Dali designed the Chupa Chups logo.
  • Dali died of heart failure on 23rd January 1989. He was 84.
  • Several images often appear in Dali’s surrealist paintings. These include: melting clocks, elephants, eggs, ants, snails and locusts.
  • Salvador Dali produced more than 1500 paintings in his lifetime. He also created numerous drawings, illustrations, sculptures, short films, books and lithographs.

 

 

Lets stick to subjects of a scientific nature. People, places or things related to science. I like to learn the background of the people and the circumstances that made them and their work such important historical milestones. :)

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I will do another if anyone wants to guess? Maybe to easy? Should they be harder?

 

A.post-79233-0-08269100-1402227063_thumb.png

 

 

B,post-79233-0-03028700-1402227984_thumb.png

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A. Erwin Schrödinger

B. Marie Skłodowska-Curie

Edited by Sensei

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I will do another if anyone wants to guess? Maybe to easy? Should they be harder?

 

A.attachicon.gifCC.png

Edgar Allan Poe? Nikola Tesla? Bob Smith?

Edited by Acme

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A. Erwin Schrödinger

B. Marie Skłodowska-Curie

Well done both right+1,

 

post-79233-0-33891700-1402305205_thumb.jpg

 

10. He was Influenced by Schopenhauer:

He was born in a religious household and his parents were Protestants but from an early age he was an atheist and a philosopher. He was influenced greatly by the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer. He read Schopenhauer’s works extensively and believed in the mind over matter philosophy through out his life.

9. He Got His PhD at the Age of 23:

He was a brilliant student and was homeschooled till the age of 11. He then studied at Vienna’s Akademisches Gymnasium and later at the University of Vienna. In the university he met and was greatly influenced by another physicist, Fritz Hasenöhrl. He got his PhD in physics 1910 at the age of 23 and subsequently established himself as one of the greatest theoretical physicists of all time.

8. His Cat Was both Alive and Dead at the Same Time:

The famous thought experiment called Schrödinger’s cat talks about a cat inside a box with a vile of poison that can be opened by the trigger of a decaying electron. Since we don’t know when, if at all, the electron has decayed, we can’t be sure whether the cat is dead or alive. So in a way we can say that the cat is both alive and dead at the same time.

His-Cat-Was-both-Alive-and-Dead-at-the-S

7. He Wrote His Greatest Work in a Sanatorium:

The Schrödinger equation changed the way scientists looked at particles and allowed them to predict the motion of the particles through wave mechanics. He wrote this thesis while recovering from tuberculosis in a sanatorium in Arosa. He suffered from tuberculosis many times in his life but it also gave him the time to write his greatest work.

6. He Was Against the Prosecution of Jews:

He was forced to abandon his studies and join the Austrian-Hungarian army during the First World War. After the war he took up many teaching positions in universities such as the University of Stuttgart, University of Jena, University of Breslau, University of Berlin and the University of Zurich. He was against the anti Semitic sentiment rising in the area and eventually left Germany on the rise of Hitler’s Nazi Party.

5. He Won the Nobel Prize in 1933:

When he left the University of Berlin to join Oxford he learned that he had won the Nobel Prize for physics of 1933. He shared the Nobel Prize with another physicist, Paul A.M. Dirac. In his speech he mentioned that his friend and mentor Fritz Hasenöhrl would have been accepting the award if he hadn’t died in the First World War.

4. He Had an Irish Passport:

Schrödinger had to relocate many times to find a country that would give him a job and be tolerant of his views. In 1939 he was invited to work at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Dublin by the Irish Prime Minister. He stayed in Dublin till the mid 1950′s and had an Irish passport.

3. A Crater on the Moon is Named After Him:

He received many accolades during his life time for his contribution to science and to the world in general. Apart from the Nobel Prize he also won the Max Planck Medal in 1937. As a homage to his work a crater on the dark side of the moon is named large crater Schrödinger.

A-Crater-on-the-Moon-is-Named-After-Him.

2. He Tried to Unify Physics with Genetics:

One of the great works of his later life is the book called “What is Life?” In this book Schrödinger tried to answer the question of where life comes from by looking at it from the perspective of physics. In this book he talked about an “aperiodic crystal” that contained all the genetic information required to reproduce life which later inspired the discovery of the genetic molecule.

1. He Was a Believer in the Vedanta Philosophy:

Through out his life his inclination towards philosophy was strong. He understood that the purpose of science is to try to reach the metaphorical godhead. He was particularly interested in the eastern spiritual traditions and believed in the Vedanta philosophy of Hinduism that there was a universal consciousness that gave birth to the individual conscious.

 

B,

B, n-MARIE-CURIE-large570.jpg?6

FACT #1. She was a whiz kid. Marie, born Maria "Manya" Salomea Skłodowska, graduated from high school at age 15. She was first in her class.

Marie Curie at age 16.

FACT #2. She was a rebel. Maria let nothing stand in the way of her education. After high school, in the 1880s, she attended Warsaw's "Floating University," an illegal, underground night school run by a handful of young Poles. Classes met in changing locations to avoid discovery by the Czarist authorities. Once Maria had the funds, she headed to France to study at the Sorbonne, since women could not attend university in Poland. This is when she changed her name to its French version, Marie. She lived with her sister and brother-in-law, Dr. Kazimierz Dluski, who noted Marie'sindependent spirit in a brusque letter to her father:

Ms. Marie works very diligently. She spends nearly all day at the Sorbonne, we usually only see her in the evening. She is a very independent person, therefore though you named me her official guardian, she not only shows me little respect, but also refuses to listen. She cares about my authority as much as she would care about a torn shoe.

FACT #3. Science ran in the family. Her grandfather was a physics and chemistry teacher and her father taught physics and math. Marie's daughter Irène Joliot-Curie continued her work, winning a Nobel Prize for Chemistry along with her husband, Frédéric Joliot-Curie, for their discovery of artificial radioactivity. And today, Irène's children are both esteemed scientists -- Hélène Langevin-Joliot is a nuclear physicist and Pierre Joliot-Curie a biologist.

FACT #4. She married her lab partner. Looking for a place to do her own research in 1894, Marie was introduced to chemist Pierre Curie, lab director of the Municipal School of Industrial Physics and Chemistry in Paris. Pierre cleared a space for her in the lab, and the two hit it off. According to Marie, “Our work drew us closer and closer, until we were both convinced that neither of us could find a better life companion.”

In a love letter to Marie, Pierre wrote:

It would, nevertheless, be a beautiful thing in which I hardly dare believe, to pass through life together hypnotized in our dreams: your dream for your country; our dream for humanity; our dream for science.

The two were married in the summer of 1895. Marie wore a dark blue outfit that she continued to wear in her lab for years afterward.

o-MARIE-PIERRE-570.jpg?2

Pierre and Marie Curie in the laboratory.

FACT #5. She pitched in during World War I. In 1914, Marie put together afleet of vehicles carrying portable X-ray machines, called "Petites Curies." These machines helped doctors image broken bones, shrapnel and bullets in patients on the front lines.

o-MARIE-CURIE-X-RAY-570.jpg?1

Marie Curie in a "Petite Curie," a mobile X-ray vehicle.

FACT #6. She vacationed with Einstein. In 1950, when asked which physicists he admired the most, Einstein picked Hendrik Lorentz, and Marie Curie. Marie and Einstein met in 1909 and remained colleagues and friends for nearly 25 years. They attended many scientific conferences together and even took their families hiking together in the Swiss Alps.

o-MARIE-EINSTEIN-570.jpg?2

Marie Curie with Albert Einstein.

FACT #7. She found a silver lining in widowhood. In 1906, Pierre was killed in a tragic street accident. Although deeply saddened, Marie moved forward with her work, taking over Pierre's post in the physics department to become the first female professor at the Sorbonne. In 1911, she was the only woman at the world's first international meeting of physicist and chemists, the Solvay Conference in Belgium.

o-SOLVAY-CONFERENCE-570.jpg?2

Photograph of participants of the first Solvay Conference, in 1911, Brussels, Belgium. Marie Curie is seated next to Henri Poincaré. Standing behind them to the far right are Albert Einstein and Paul Langevin. Other notable scientists included in the photograph are Max Planck, Hendrik Lorentz and Ernest Rutherford.

FACT #8. She was a homewrecker. In 1910, four years after Pierre died, she began a romantic relationship with Paul Langevin, one of Pierre's former students. Langevin was married with four children, so the lovers rented a secret flat in Paris for their trysts. Eventually, Langevin's wife reported the pair to the press after allegedly discovering passionate letters exchanged by the lovers. Only a few days before Marie was set to receive her second Nobel, members of the prize committee asked her not to come accept her award in Stockholm in person.

She disregarded the warning, stating simply:

The prize has been awarded for the discovery of radium and polonium. I believe that there is no connection between my scientific work and the facts of private life. I cannot accept ... that the appreciation of the value of scientific work should be influenced by libel and slander concerning private life.

Still, the relationship between Marie and Langevin ended -- but in a twist of fate, two generations later, Langevin's grandson and Curie's granddaughter got hitched.

Paul Langevin (1872-1946).

FACT #9. America's president gave her a "hot" gift. In 1921, Marie Curie took her first trip to the United States, touring the country from New York City to Chicago to Washington, D.C. On behalf of millions of American women who chipped in, President Harding presented Marie with a gram of radium worth more than $100,000. "We greet you as foremost among scientists in the age of science, as leader among women in the generation which sees woman come tardily into her own," Harding said.

FACT #10. She was a martyr for science -- but maybe not in the way you would expect. On July 4, 1934, she died of aplastic anemia, a rare blood disease. For years, many assumed her death was caused by years of exposure to radiation from working with radium. But in 1995, a radiology expert tested her remains and found that radiation levels were low -- leading scientists to speculate that her early death may have been caused by her work with X-rays during World War I.

post-79233-0-36655600-1402305370_thumb.png

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WOW, you put a lot of work into that. Very detailed, with many things I didn't know. I don't know why I like biographical subject matter so much, I guess I like getting the goods on people. :)

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