Jump to content

Recommended Posts

18 minutes ago, fredreload said:

Hey Swanson, well it sort of discharge the circuit, like a lightning

How? Has this ever been observed?

How is this like lightning?

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, swansont said:

How? Has this ever been observed?

How is this like lightning?

Because the laser redirect and ground the current, causing a discharge. I am not sure why voltage is consciousness, I am still working out the idea, give me some time.

P.S. It seems to be an excess in voltage not dissipated as power

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fredreload said:

Because the laser redirect and ground the current, causing a discharge. I am not sure why voltage is consciousness, I am still working out the idea, give me some time.

1. Things are not true just because you say them. Stating that lasers redirect current is not something you can base any discussion on until AFTER you establish it is true.

2. Regarding voltage being consciousness see 1), but also you aren’t permitted to bring up speculations in other threads.

 

1 hour ago, fredreload said:

P.S. It seems to be an excess in voltage not dissipated as power

 

That’s not a statement that has any basis in science. I am loath to touch it, knowing where it must have come from.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I’d have better luck picking up a turd by the clean end than having a rational intelligible conversation with this OP.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, fredreload said:

If I beam a laser at a series circuit, does the laser share the voltage of the circuit?

If I aim a reply at a silly post, does the reply share the inconsequence of the post?

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Area54 said:

If I aim a reply at a silly post, does the reply share the inconsequence of the post?

Dunno, it shares the circuit but is in parallel(same voltage), it might have to be in series to be effective.

1 hour ago, swansont said:

That’s not a statement that has any basis in science. I am loath to touch it, knowing where it must have come from.

Where do you think it comes from? I was referring to this chart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance#/media/File:RLC_Series_Circuit_Bode_Magnitude_Plot.svg

You'd think that the voltage is dissipated through the inductor's magnetic field, but something tells me that is not the case.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, fredreload said:

 

Where do you think it comes from? I was referring to this chart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance#/media/File:RLC_Series_Circuit_Bode_Magnitude_Plot.svg

You'd think that the voltage is dissipated through the inductor's magnetic field, but something tells me that is not the case.

Your chart says nothing about "excess in voltage not dissipated as power"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, swansont said:

Your chart says nothing about "excess in voltage not dissipated as power"

"The gain for the voltage across the capacitor and inductor combined in series shows antiresonance, with gain going to zero at the natural frequency."

This, I'd assume the anti-resonance effect gets canceled out by the inductor and irradiated as the magnetic field, or perhaps you could explain this anti-resonance phenomenon?

P.S. No, I am assuming the voltage would get dissipated as heat cuz of the conservation of energy.

Edited by fredreload
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, fredreload said:

"The gain for the voltage across the capacitor and inductor combined in series shows antiresonance, with gain going to zero at the natural frequency."

This, I'd assume the anti-resonance effect gets canceled out by the inductor and irradiated as the magnetic field, or perhaps you could explain this anti-resonance phenomenon?

P.S. No, I am assuming the voltage would get dissipated as heat cuz of the conservation of energy.

Maybe you could learn some physics instead of relying on assumptions.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, swansont said:

Maybe you could learn some physics instead of relying on assumptions.

Ya I know, a lot of guess work there lol. The electricity flows from a higher electrical potential to a lower one. That means I need to make the laser path a conductor to discharge the electricity.

P.S. Might need an electron laser if I do not want to ionize the air path.

Edited by fredreload
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This is harder than I thought = =, because the material is not carried along. If I conduct a circuit on a gold wire, how do I move the voltage exhibited on a resistor?

P.S. Alright I get it, you duplicate the resistor's resistance on the air path.

Edited by fredreload
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fredreload said:

Ya I know, a lot of guess work there lol. The electricity flows from a higher electrical potential to a lower one. That means I need to make the laser path a conductor to discharge the electricity.

P.S. Might need an electron laser if I do not want to ionize the air path.

A laser is not, and cannot be a conductor.

"electron laser" is meaningless. 

7 minutes ago, fredreload said:

This is harder than I thought = =, because the material is not carried along. If I conduct a circuit on a gold wire, how do I move the voltage exhibited on a resistor?

P.S. Alright I get it, you duplicate the resistor's resistance on the air path.

This is also meaningless. Why are you putting random words together. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Klaynos said:

A laser is not, and cannot be a conductor.

"electron laser" is meaningless. 

This is also meaningless. Why are you putting random words together. 

You could change the material of the resistor by replacing one atom at a time. In this case creating an air path with laser with the same resistance and slowly replacing the resistor. You could also shave or transform the material, that would be out of my scope. The voltage would drop a bit but it is the same entity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Klaynos said:

"electron laser" is meaningless. 

To be clear, there is such a thing as a free electron laser, but yes, the way fredreload used it was meaningless. (and a free electron laser is one that’s potentially capable of ionizing air along its path)

47 minutes ago, fredreload said:

This is harder than I thought

It’s fiction, so whether it’s hard or easy is just a matter of the plot.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, exchemist said:

I think this poster is wasting everyone's time, possibly deliberately.

That was my impression. And not as amusing as some of the time wasters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, swansont said:

To be clear, there is such a thing as a free electron laser, but yes, the way fredreload used it was meaningless. (and a free electron laser is one that’s potentially capable of ionizing air along its path)

The electron flows from high potential to low potential, so if I create a path with electron laser with medium potential, it would carry some resistance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, fredreload said:

The electron flows from high potential to low potential, so if I create a path with electron laser with medium potential, it would carry some resistance.

You say electron laser as if you need an electron laser to do this.

Or are you thinking that an "electron laser" emits electrons?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, swansont said:

You say electron laser as if you need an electron laser to do this.

Or are you thinking that an "electron laser" emits electrons?

Ya I was thinking of free electron laser which emit electron in the form of a current. But any type of powerful laser such as infrared could ionize air and produce plasma in mid air when focused on a spot. I am assuming air ionization means using photon to knock out an electron in air.

 

Edited by fredreload
Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, fredreload said:

Ya I was thinking of free electron laser which emit electron in the form of a current

They don’t emit electrons. The laser light is emitted by electrons that are being accelerated.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, fredreload said:

I was thinking of free electron laser which emit electron in the form of a current.

A free electron laser employs electrons as a gain medium. Photons are emitted, not electrons.

edit: x-post

Edited by Ghideon
x-post with Swansont
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.