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I remember that there was some theory a guy made which stated that computer memory doubled every *blank* years. I'm not even sure if what i have is correct but if you know of what im talking about or even something similar please reply.

Edited by random!@#%
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  • 3 weeks later...

I think Moore's Law is like a Linear O(n) Progression of his assumption ...

 

but I think with going into the future, Moore's Law is more like a Logarithm O(log n) Progression,

where the amount of advancement in computing power during his assumed time period,

is dynamic and slowly increase !

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Memory is proportional to the "square" of the SURFACE DENSITY OF TRANSISTORS. The relation between the rise with time, is because the rise is linked to the capacity itself, i.e. proportional to it.

 

There are many Computer Theories. I think that what you are talking about is that related in general to the advances in Computer Systems.

By the way, memory capacities and speeds are now saturating in the already known technologies. New ones need get discovered if present; which is a good question.

 

Do any one have any idea?

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Very advanced system is biological computer, but there is an ethical problem. Neurocomputer is fast and efficient. In order to avoid ethical problem using quantum computer is more clever.

 

Positive, but notice that Neurocomputer and Quantum Computer are still theoretical ...

 

There are many great things in theory, but with no possible application, which makes them dead in the real-world,

Edited by khaled
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Very advanced system is biological computer, but there is an ethical problem. Neurocomputer is fast and efficient. In order to avoid ethical problem using quantum computer is more clever.

 

I have no ethical problems using my personal neurocomputer and I even rent it out to my employers.

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I have no ethical problems using my personal neurocomputer and I even rent it out to my employers.

 

I am worried about the developed neurocomputer technology. If the technology were developed, we would have no difference between life and death.

What is the death, mind death or body death? Developed neurocomputer technology can makes no dieing mind. It would make big ethical problem.

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New feature currently already in hardware testing in labs are memory modules where the communication between transistors is conducted through fiber. The main bottleneck in current memory should thus be solved. You could compare the improvement in speed with the evolution from disk based HD's to the currently emerging SSD's.

Edited by Defiler
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  • 6 months later...

Nano is evolving. Get prepared.

 

Memory is proportional to the "square" of the SURFACE DENSITY OF TRANSISTORS. The relation between the rise with time, is because the rise is linked to the capacity itself, i.e. proportional to it.

 

Memory Capacity is supposed to be proportional to Surface Density, but since surface density refers to number per um, as one dimension is considered to be undiminishible, due to implementation consideration, then proportionality is in a square sense.

 

Applying previous, with the technology minimum possible length being considered, which is 'max' in below, with beta being inverse sqrt of proportionality constant between C and squared density ; we can get:

 

 

[latex]\frac{dC}{dt}=\frac{C}{alpha} (max-beta C^{0.5})[/latex]

 

From which we can get:

 

[latex]C=\frac{1}{(K e^{\frac{-max}{alpha} t} + \frac{max}{beta})^{2}}[/latex]

 

Which matches Moore's to a great extent.

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