Jump to content

Who had a greater impact on advancing computers and its sciences? Babbage or Turing?


Joshcitylife
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was in a debate about these two grand characters a few days ago and wanted to know what the community thinks about it. We have two great minds in Alan Turing and Charles Babbage. We decided to see which of them had a greater contribution to the advancement of the computer as well as how to interact and implement them in every day life. 
 

All replies welcomed! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turing. It's not about the mind or the contribution: all scientific knowledge builds on previous knowledge. It's about the circumstances that propel a particular branch of science forward. War gets government funding and backing for enterprises that might otherwise come to naught, or just have to wait for the next big push. 

Edited by Peterkin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Joshcitylife said:

I was in a debate about these two grand characters a few days ago and wanted to know what the community thinks about it. We have two great minds in Alan Turing and Charles Babbage. We decided to see which of them had a greater contribution to the advancement of the computer as well as how to interact and implement them in every day life. 
 

All replies welcomed! 

What a silly question and what a good reply from @Peterkin  +1

The question is like asking which goes faster a Fiat 500 or a Trabant , whilst ignoring the likes of Porsche, Ferrari, TransAm etc.

What do you mean by computer anyway ?

The object that most people identify with as a 'computer' was due to Von Neumann.

Edited by studiot
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Neither.
I would argue the honor goes to Physicist Robert Noyce who pioneered the monolithic silicon integrated circuit in 1959.
He founded Fairchild Semiconductor, and along with Gordon Moore, founded Intel.

Robert Noyce - Wikipedia

Honorable mention should also go to Jack Kilby, electrical engineer, developer of the first hybrid germanium IC at Texas Instruments in the late 50s ( and Nobel Prize for Physics in 2000 ).

They are arguably the fathers of modern computing, as we know it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Joshcitylife said:

Well this is why im glad we have access to this kind of forum because we can gather great minds from all over the world to give their own unique input. 

You have posted this in homework help.

Are you working on some kind of project  ?

If so here are some more pointers.

 

Babbage's wife, Ada Lovelace probably added more to computer theory than Babbage himself.

But the great thing would be to separate the those who added practicality and those who developed theory.

Both of these were needed in roughly equal parts.

It is not known who invented the abacus, various civilisations in ancient history had some form or other.

Later calculating machines were developed to, well to help calculate values for tables.

Napier was the theorist and Outred the practical implementer (he invented the slide rule)

Digital Theory probably started with DeMorgan.

This is where Babbage came in with his analytical engine (the practical man) and Ada was the theorist.

The next big development came before Turing's time and was still purely mechanical.

Industry threw up the need for control of machines that required a series of steps.

Hollerith invented the punch card system, which also started 'data processing'.

Electricity was also beginning to make an impact and devices using electric switches (relays) followed by vlaves (american tubes) and then semiconductor devices were made.

Von Neuman formalised the idea of 'the stored program architecture' originally using Hollerith cards and the modern computer was born.

Turing did much theoretical work on the capabilities and limitations of such machines and invented the 'turing machine' as an idealised model.

 

Now I have started your rehabilitation from the red marks with a +1  since you are showing some sense now.

Keep it up and I hope you project, if you have one, goes well.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.