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JPQuiceno

Getting into M.I.T.

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I'm 16, I graduated 2 years early from highschool. I currently am working at a carwash making about $300 dollars a week. I'm in the process of getting my A+ and Network+ certifications.

 

I wan't to attend M.I.T, and get a Ph.D in Theoretical Physics. I don't want to do it for the money, but because I love Theoretical Physics. I love to learn, with a passion.

 

If I do get accepted into M.I.T, I plain to work as an I.T tech (A+,Network+).

I also plan to make my fortune investing in the real estate market, and also selling. Miami's real estate market is on fire, and my uncle owns a real estate firm.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point.

 

I wan't to get into M.I.T. I've heard many frieghtning strories of people getting denied & etc.

 

What do you actually need to get into mit.

 

I have a 3.9 GPA. I'm planning on taking the SAT's next year, and starting to study for it 6 months in advance.

 

Do I need a high gpa ( I guess mine would do?) and good SAT scores, and thats it?

 

Or is there something else.

 

Please, someone clear this up for me. It is my dream to go to M.I.T.

 

Thank you for your help.

 

-Juan Pablo Quiceno

 

16 Years Old

 

Miami, FL, U.S.A

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I am only a high school student but I have heard, and would guess, that extracurriculars would count towards an acceptance from M.I.T. If physics is your passion then try to volunteer at a physics lab (if you haven't done so). That's my two cents.

 

Will

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Helix is right; you should try to find some sort of science related job. Join every group under the sun that might look good on an application: a couple of charities, a physics group, a poetry writing group. You might try roaming around the physics labs at a university in Florida and see if any of them know anybody that works in the MIT physics department.

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MIT receives thousands and thousands of appilication every year, but do you know what's the percentage that get accpted? 14% in 2005, and 98% of people who apply there have a GPA of 4.0 and Sat score at least 1590 in each verbal and math section of the old version of SAT.

 

Do you think you can make it???????????

 

be realistic

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i've seen some of the smartest, most well rounded people rejected from there... a friend of mine was valedictorian, a professional-level pianist/violinist, 1600 SAT/36 ACT, in every club/service organization imaginable, and he was rejected. the applicant pool to MIT is ridiculous- if you get in, it's like winning the lottery- just about no one is guaranteed entry. there are a lot of other good schools out there that you should look into. good luck though.

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, a professional-level pianist/violinist, 1600 SAT/36 ACT, in every club/service organization imaginable, and he was rejected.

 

how do a talent in piano, joining in clubs make you more eminent than others on university admission?

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Where you go as an undergrad isn't really as important as where you go for grad school. And if you manage to get into MIT as an undergrad, the odds are very slim that they'd let you in to their grad school, since that pathway is typically discouraged. Getting exposure to a wider spectrum of science is important.

 

Wherever you end up, you want a place that will allow you to get involved in research as an undergrad, to get a boost in acceptance in the grad school of your choice. And even if you don't, you can get a good education at many, many schools.

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Well if you can get a 1600 on your SATs and still get rejected, then who gets in? Nobel laureates? Sounds like admission is more political than academic.

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how do a talent in piano, joining in clubs make you more eminent than others on university admission?

 

unitversities generally want multitalented, well-roundend students so they can keep or better their reputations. extracurricular stuff is incredibly important to admission. they don't generally want people who study all day and do nothing else- academic perfomance is important- probably the most important thing in admission, but it certainly isn't the only thing.

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Well if you can get a 1600 on your SATs and still[/b'] get rejected, then who gets in? Nobel laureates? Sounds like admission is more political than academic.

 

at the level of M.I.T., a lot seems like it's thrown to chance. i talked to an admissions guy there and he said that MIT couldn't choose the best, they had to choose from among the best.

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Well if you can get a 1600 on your SATs and still[/b'] get rejected, then who gets in? Nobel laureates? Sounds like admission is more political than academic.

 

 

That is what I'm afraid of.

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I find it hard to believe that 98% of the applicants have a 1590 or higher on the SAT, is this true?

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Where you go as an undergrad isn't really as important as where you go for grad school. And if you manage to get into MIT as an undergrad' date=' the odds are very slim that they'd let you in to their grad school, since that pathway is typically discouraged. Getting exposure to a wider spectrum of science is important.

 

Wherever you end up, you want a place that will allow you to get involved in research as an undergrad, to get a boost in acceptance in the grad school of your choice. And even if you don't, you can get a good education at many, many schools.[/quote']

 

 

What do you mean its not recommended?

 

 

Please explain. Thanks.

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That is what I'm afraid of.

 

 

Well if the admissions office is just a political frenzy, then fudge them. Go somewhere else, do your best and be better than them. Make them regret their choise.

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Have you ever considered the idea that M.I.T. is a pretentious elitist society where the politics of their educational system dishonor the adoption of female students into their school, only to make up with a ridiculous online, free education, open-source directory?

 

Have you ever considered that there may be better places overseas than M.I.T. who would be willing to enroll you into their school?

 

Have you considered a plan where you do under-graduate work for one year and a half and then enroll into somewhere, such as Harvard, for another semester, thus allowing you to say you earned your degree from Harvard?

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TBH, if you really love theoretical physics, are you looking at MIT because it gives the best course, or because it has a trendy/good name? If it is the latter then you need to seriousely think about whether you do truely love physics :P

 

If I had my choice between studying physics at the worst uni in the UK and not studying physics, I would go for studying it because I love it so much...

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TBH, if you really love theoretical physics, are you looking at MIT because it gives the best course, or because it has a trendy/good name? ...

 

MIT, trendy?!

 

My initial response to the OP was 'Piss off God", but then I got to the line

It is my dream to go to M.I.T.

 

Don't dis some-one's dream.

 

JPQuiceno:

 

If your old college admission counsellor can't help you, find an MIT alumna in your area, and write for an interview. Ask what you can do to make yourself a better candidate. Ask if she has an internship available that would make you a better candidate. Ask if she knows of any other alumae/i in the area you could ask for advice.

 

What you are looking for is a recommendation; schools that have far more qualified candidates that they could ever admit give weight to alumnae/i recommendations.

 

Other things to consider:

Every well-educated nerd genius in the world applies to MIT [gross exageration; don't bother to dispute]. MIT likes articulate, well-rounded, intelligent, and emotionally stable prospects. They would like to know that your first 'C' won't send you out of a dorm window. They like candidates that might play well on 'Nova'.

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TBH' date=' if you really love theoretical physics, are you looking at MIT because it gives the best course, or because it has a trendy/good name? If it is the latter then you need to seriousely think about whether you do truely love physics :P

 

If I had my choice between studying physics at the worst uni in the UK and not studying physics, I would go for studying it because I love it so much...[/quote']

 

 

To be honest Klaynos, it is the first. I have learned a lot about M.I.T, from the campus, to its history, to the type of people that apply there. I have also learned people go their to work and learn, not to mess around. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure there are other schools which have excellent programs, but M.I.T fancies me the most (if that is actually grammatically correct).

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MIT' date=' [i']trendy?![/i]

 

My initial response to the OP was 'Piss off God", but then I got to the line

 

 

Don't dis some-one's dream.

 

JPQuiceno:

 

If your old college admission counsellor can't help you, find an MIT alumna in your area, and write for an interview. Ask what you can do to make yourself a better candidate. Ask if she has an internship available that would make you a better candidate. Ask if she knows of any other alumae/i in the area you could ask for advice.

 

What you are looking for is a recommendation; schools that have far more qualified candidates that they could ever admit give weight to alumnae/i recommendations.

 

Other things to consider:

Every well-educated nerd genius in the world applies to MIT [gross exageration; don't bother to dispute]. MIT likes articulate, well-rounded, intelligent, and emotionally stable prospects. They would like to know that your first 'C' won't send you out of a dorm window. They like candidates that might play well on 'Nova'.

 

Thanks for the tip. I just RSVP'ed for a M.I.T mini-con that is coming to miami september 11th. Wish me luck!

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If I wish you luck, you'll end up at Northwestern [i love Chicago].

 

Remember your social skills.

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What do you mean its not recommended?

 

 

Please explain. Thanks.

 

It's generally thought that going to grad school where you were an undergrad isn't a good idea, since you need to be exposed to different professors working on different problems, and other ways of approaching problems. They wouldn't let Feynman do it.

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I've heard the same thing in general, but not specifically about Feynman. You'd think they'd want to keep him as a grad student.

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I've heard the same thing in general, but not specifically about Feynman. You'd think they'd want to keep him as a grad student.

 

Feynman mentioned it in one of his books, about how he wanted to stay at MIT and get his doctorate there, but they wouldn't let him. So they didn't want to keep him as a grad student.

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Where did he go to for grad school?

 

Is this a "generally recommended" thing, or is it enforced? (it may have changed since Feynman's time)

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