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Eugenio U

Explaining cosmic expansion by calculating speed limit

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Speed is not a feature of gravity this means the universe does not have a speed limit.

In other words "c" in "e=mcc" should be calculated as "c=f(G)", why?

Well we know that c is a "special speed" which defines "difficulty to move at that speed"

But we also know that galaxies move away faster than "c", then we know that "G" defines the "difficulty to move"

Connecting all of that:

Galaxies are able to go faster than c because they have lower G which means a higher c

Cosmic expansion may also be cause partially by an "outer sphere" in addition to this.

That is the lower G gets the higher c gets, so in this way we can fix relativity without requiring space expansion.

This would also mean that the universe is finite which suggests that if an object "big bang" is big enough in terms of the "share of total material"

Then gravity is a lot weaker and that enables it to accelerate also considering that the geometry of an explosion disperses mass in all directions which means the force that slows galaxies down is also dispersed.

This says that "c" should not be a constant but should be calculated inverse to a proportion of G, because c is the speed in which you gain weight or interact a lot with G.

In other words "c" is the speed of light but that is only true locally not in terms of local group to local group in other words

c=escape velocity of the local group

This is just part of my complete view of the universe

More here:

url deleted

I tried to use the best world I could thought of but there may be some  small inconsistencies because English is not my native language.

 

I would love to clarify any doubt

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Apparent galactic motion, or more specifically, recession, is not a speed.
G does not define 'difficulty to move'; mass is what resists inertia changes.

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Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, MigL said:

Apparent galactic motion, or more specifically, recession, is not a speed.
G does not define 'difficulty to move'; mass is what resists inertia changes.

In this sense G=local mass + global mass, maybe I am not using the right words

Or rather mass=E/G;

Edited by Eugenio U

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Moderator Note

Making posts to advertise your site or video channel is a violation of the rules. Link removed.

Arguments must be made here

 

Also, you need to provide evidence of your conjecture, or some model that can be tested 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hello, here are some comments regarding the idea.

8 hours ago, Eugenio U said:

But we also know that galaxies move away faster than "c"

That does not seem to agree with observations and accepted mainstream models of the universe. Can you provide a reference supporting that statement? The rest of the arguments and conclusions does not hold when based on an initial misconception. 

Maybe you misinterpreted speed and recession? In addition to @MigL's answer here is a paper that explains common misconceptions: https://cds.cern.ch/record/679214/files/0310808.pdf. Example:

Quote

Superluminal recession is a feature of all expanding cosmological models that are homogeneous and isotropic and therefore obey Hubble’s law. This does not contradict special relativity because the superluminal motion does not occur in any observer’s inertial frame. All observers measure light locally to be travelling at c and nothing ever overtakes a photon.

Instead of trying to find a variable speed of light in vacuum, maybe you could investigate or ask what cosmological models say about redshift of light? 

Redshift on cosmological scales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble's_law

Redshift and mass: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_redshift

 

7 hours ago, Eugenio U said:

G=local mass + global mass

What is a local mass and what makes it separate from global mass? What is global mass? 

 

Edited by Ghideon
references for redshift

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On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

Speed is not a feature of gravity

This is not really correct, because gravity has the right degrees of freedom so that it can propagate in the form of gravitational radiation - and such radiation fields never propagate at more than the speed of light.

On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

this means the universe does not have a speed limit.

This is a non-sequitur, because there are fundamental interactions other than gravity happening in the universe.

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On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

Speed is not a feature of gravity this means the universe does not have a speed limit.

Yes it is. Gravity propagates at the speed of light.

On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

In other words "c" in "e=mcc" should be calculated as "c=f(G)", why?

What is the function f()? Can you define it for us?

We know that c is a constant (and, more importantly, invariant). I assume this means that G is also a constant? What s the value of G?

 

On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

Galaxies are able to go faster than c because they have lower G which means a higher c

c is a constant, so there cannot be a "higher c".

 

On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

That is the lower G gets the higher c gets, so in this way we can fix relativity without requiring space expansion.

What is G?

Why do you think that relativity needs to be fixed? Do you think it produces incorrect results?

Why do you think that space is not expanding? What about all the evidence (CMB, proportions of hydrogen and helium, large scale structure of the universe, etc. etc)

On 7/20/2020 at 3:05 AM, Eugenio U said:

This is just part of my complete view of the universe

It sounds like your "complete view of the universe" is seriously out of line with the universe.

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