moonknight

Is it possible to make steel less attracted to magnets?

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The steel I'm working with is not magnetic themselves, if I put the two pieces of steel together they will not stick together.

 

But is it possible to make the steel not stick to a magnet, or at the very least make the piece of steel less attracted to a magnet?

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They make steels that are specifically non-magnetic.

 

Google "austenitic stainless" or just "non-magnetic steel". Have you never noticed how your stainless steel kitchen cutlery isn't magnetic?

 

As for the steel you're currently using the only thing you can do is work it a lot to break up crystals, or heat it up. But unless you're going to keep it heated constantly there's little that will do.

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Yeah I know about non-magnetic stainless steel, I just need to do something with the steel I'm working with currently. So if heating it is an option, what would be the best way to heat it? Would boiling it in water work? And how long does it stay less magnetic?

 

Also, would zapping it with electricity do anything?

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Yeah I know about non-magnetic stainless steel, I just need to do something with the steel I'm working with currently. So if heating it is an option, what would be the best way to heat it? Would boiling it in water work? And how long does it stay less magnetic?

 

Also, would zapping it with electricity do anything?

You can heat it above the curie temperature and then place it in an east-west orientation and then hit lightly multiple times...with a hammer.

By heating it, you make the dipoles more mobile and you can more easily displace them with a hammer.

You do have to heat the metal above the curie temperature.

here you have a list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curie_temperature

This removes magnetism, I don't think you can prevent new magnetism in this way.

You can buy demagnetizers.

I think there are sprays which clean and demagnetize, maybe they can reduce attraction.

Edited by Itoero

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You can heat it above the curie temperature and then place it in an east-west orientation and then hit lightly multiple times...with a hammer.

By heating it, you make the dipoles more mobile and you can more easily displace them with a hammer.

You do have to heat the metal above the curie temperature.

here you have a list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curie_temperature

This removes magnetism, I don't think you can prevent new magnetism in this way.

You can buy demagnetizers.

I think there are sprays which clean and demagnetize, maybe they can reduce attraction.

Magnetization and attraction to magnets are different (though can be related) things.

 

---

 

This may be relevant

 

"Since 400-series stainless steels are entirely ferritic or martensitic, their magnetic properties cannot be reduced through annealing.

There are no plating or finishing processes, such as passivation, that can reduce or eliminate work hardening induced magnetism. They are merely superficial and do not change the affected grain structure."

 

http://www.pencomsf.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/TB_MAG_SS.pdf

 

Sounds like if you have a magnetic material, you will continue to have a magnetic material.

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Yeah I know about non-magnetic stainless steel, I just need to do something with the steel I'm working with currently. So if heating it is an option, what would be the best way to heat it? Would boiling it in water work? And how long does it stay less magnetic?

 

Also, would zapping it with electricity do anything?

 

Keeping the material warm keeps the material less magnetic but for most practical applications that's obviously not effective. As for the annealing and tempering it'd pretty much immediately become paramagnetic again.

 

Paramagnetic materials will always be attracted to a magnet so long as their molecules are cool enough to align properly, you might just have to invest in some different steel. May I ask in what scenario the steel comes into contact with a magnetic field?

Edited by _Rick_

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To convert a magnetic ferromagnetic substance into non-magnetic, we have to apply AC at its ends (that will disorganise the molecular magnets.)

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To convert a magnetic ferromagnetic substance into non-magnetic, we have to apply AC at its ends (that will disorganise the molecular magnets.)

But the OP specifically says he does't have ferromagnet issues ("The steel I'm working with is not magnetic themselves"), so this is moot.

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To convert a magnetic ferromagnetic substance into non-magnetic, we have to apply AC at its ends (that will disorganise the molecular magnets.)

That would stop it being a magnet; but it would still me magnetic.

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