sevenseas

"Shocking" video of comet ISON causes "panic"?!?

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The observatory of Lisbon has published a video of Comet ISON, causing panic.

The comet will be visible DURING THE DAY on all the planet on November 29 2013.

 

 

uM24C1a.jpg

 

 

See the shocking video here:

 

http://third-secret.pro-forum.co.uk/h51-comet-ison

 

 

ps :enable java-script if you have problems to load the video

 

 

The 10 km wide core of comet will practically touch the surface of the sun, if the comet survives its orbit will be changed irreversibly, and it will be a Russian roulette for earth.

 

If we believe their calculations ISON WILL BE ON COLLISION COURSE WITH EARTH, WITH IMPACT IN DECEMBER.

 

ISON-trajectory-SOHO-illus_edited-1.jpg

Edited by sevenseas
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The observatory of Lisbon has published a video of Comet ISON, causing panic.

 

The comet will be visible DURING THE DAY on all the planet on November 29 2013.

 

 

uM24C1a.jpg

 

 

See the shocking video here:

 

http://third-secret.pro-forum.co.uk/h51-comet-ison

 

 

I am really looking forward to that, it will be awesome!

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http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2013/18jan_cometison/

 

Let's not go overboard. Not only are comets "unpredictable" (as that NASA link says), using words like "shocking" is sensationalism. Especially since it won't come anywhere near Earth.

 

 

The comet ISON HAS A 10 KILOMETERS CORE, it will be so close to the sun that its trajectory will not be stable or predictable any longer, so it could be rerouted to earth..

 

ISON_LASCO1.jpg

Edited by sevenseas

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Is it possible for someone to change the tile to this thread because it's plainly misleading.

Who is shocked? Who is panicking?

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The comet ISON HAS A 10 KILOMETERS CORE, it will be so close to the sun that its trajectory will not be stable or predictable any longer, so it could be rerouted to earth..

From the link I gave you:

A break-up would pose no threat to Earth, assures Yeomans. "Comet ISON is not on a collision course. If it breaks up, the fragments would continue along the same safe trajectory as the original comet."

It doesn't say anything about a possible rerouting of the comet's path. Probably because there is none. We know how orbits work.

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Isn't that the one that is supposed to pass very close to Mars?



Is it possible for someone to change the tile to this thread because it's plainly misleading.

Who is shocked? Who is panicking?

 

 

Evidently sevenseas is tongue.png

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Is it possible for someone to change the tile to this thread because it's plainly misleading.

 

!

Moderator Note

Yes, we can.

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Comets have struck Earth in the past. This was, in the early days, beneficial, since they provided a proportion of our water and perhaps a lot of out prebiotic chemistry. Later impacts were less convenient. A cometary strike today would be a disaster for civilisation and humanity. However, with a tiny smidgeon of luck we shall have the technology to detect and deflect such threats in the near future.

 

Therefore, Seven Seas, can you not find a more conviincing topic with which to troll the forum? This amateurish effort isn't even amusing.

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it appears sevenseas is a end of the world advocate.

 

according to the past they have never been correct(obviously)(including mayans)

 

but if you continue to say the world will end,

at some point in humanity it maybe correct.

even if it would be centuries later or such.

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Basically, there is no need to destroy the whole Earth for making "the end of the world".

It would suffice to make human being completely dumb.

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If NASA sees a comet this far in advanced they would likely have enough time to plan out a counter measure for when it loops around, but based on the fact that they have made no such attempts it most likely will not hit Earth. There's been closer comets before that have grazed the atmosphere. Besides, it cannot possibly be "globally" visible unless it circles the entire Earth within a day, so if you are monotheistic you'd have to ask why god would give some people a fair warning and others none at all, though you should be asking about a lot more than that in the first place.

Edited by SamBridge

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If NASA sees a comet this far in advanced they would likely have enough time to plan out a counter measure for when it loops around, but based on the fact that they have made no such attempts it most likely will not hit Earth.

Your optimism is misplaced. NASA completely lacks the technology to do anything about such a comet were it on a collision course with the Earth. We are decades away from having such technology.

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Your optimism is misplaced. NASA completely lacks the technology to do anything about such a comet were it on a collision course with the Earth. We are decades away from having such technology.

10 Kilometers is pretty big, but at that incredibly large distance, trillions of miles from us more than eight light minutes, an impact from a large weight at a certain velocity for even half a degree shift would be enough to steer it off course, that's their first planned measure for meteors that are on a course for Earth, problem is if the asteroid is too loose the weight may not impact the whole asteroid enough or if the asteroid is rotating heavily it may hit at the wrong angle and just make the asteroid spin differently. Otherwise we'd have to vaporize the asteroid, the amount of nukes it would take to completely vaporize it could end up damaging Earth in some way if the asteroid is too close or the asteroid could be loose enough that the explosion does not effect enough of the rocks as there is no atmosphere to carry any shockwaves. Though we at one point had enough nukes to destroy the entire Earth a few times over, I think NASA's definitely considered using them on an asteroid.

Edited by SamBridge
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Though we at one point had enough nukes to destroy the entire Earth a few times over, I think NASA's definitely considered using them on an asteroid.

 

I agree with much of your post (though we don't know for certain whether any proposed scheme will work in practice), but for the record, we've never had enough nukes to destroy the entire Earth. We maybe have enough now to ruin most of the land area (if we assume reported numbers don't account for all nuclear weapons actually in existence, and depending on the average yield), and maybe at one point had enough to ruin nearly all of it, but we've never come even remotely close to having the power to blow up the planet.

 

If you meant "destroy much of the surface" (as in making it unsuitable for life or modern civilization), then I apologize, but in context it looks like you were talking about actually blowing up the planet.

Edited by John

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10 Kilometers is pretty big, but at that incredibly large distance, trillions of miles from us more than eight light minutes, an impact from a large weight at a certain velocity for even half a degree shift would be enough to steer it off course, that's their first planned measure for meteors that are on a course for Earth, problem is if the asteroid is too loose the weight may not impact the whole asteroid enough or if the asteroid is rotating heavily it may hit at the wrong angle and just make the asteroid spin differently.

 

10 kilometers isn't just pretty big. It's flippin' ginormous. Could a fly change the trajectory of a bowling ball enough to change a strike into a gutter ball? That's the kind of change that is needed here.

 

Moreover, you are assuming that the incoming comet is reachable. It's not. The best we could do with our meager technology to intercept a comet coming on in a highly inclined, highly eccentric trajectory would be to launch a few days before impact, and that of course is far too late. Diverting an asteroid of this size on an orbit somewhat similar to Earth's orbit would require a decade or so of advance warning using today's technology. Diverting a comet: We don't have the technology, period.

 

 

That said, this particular comet is not going to hit us. It's not even going to come close.

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"Could a fly change the trajectory of a bowling ball enough to change a strike into a gutter ball?"

Yes, if the bowling ball was travelling from far enough away.

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10 kilometers isn't just pretty big. It's flippin' ginormous. Could a fly change the trajectory of a bowling ball enough to change a strike into a gutter ball? That's the kind of change that is needed here.

If the fly was traveling at 35 miles per second and there was no wind resistance then yes, there should be some measurable change.

 

 

Moreover, you are assuming that the incoming comet is reachable. It's not. The best we could do with our meager technology to intercept a comet coming on in a highly inclined, highly eccentric trajectory would be to launch a few days before impact, and that of course is far too late. Diverting an asteroid of this size on an orbit somewhat similar to Earth's orbit would require a decade or so of advance warning using today's technology. Diverting a comet: We don't have the technology, period.

 

I'm not exactly sure that's true, if they know the mass of the comet, it's velocity, direction and the gravitational distortion caused by the sun they can model it's trajectory very precisely as they have done to launch probes to wiz around planets to reach other planets and explore them. Tracking every comet or asteroid that we haven't found yet is hard, but if we have enough time in advanced we have the technology to propel a weight or missile fast enough to slightly change its course based on where we think the asteroid will be at a certain time. If it is highly eccentric it could get close enough to the sun to reach a huge velocity, but that's why we would try and calculate it's path before it got to the sun.

If all the planning fails we can try and use as much nukes as we have and see if that's enough. I'm not totally optimistic but I don't think we have no idea what to do either, there's definitely things we can try.

Edited by SamBridge

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It could impact earth, however it really is a one in a million type thing, I would not count on it impacting earth, however what a lovely sight it will be from earth.
If anyone has the nasa app on their smartphone, im sure you will see the flares that appear regularly and the other things you can set reminders for. Im sure they will have one for this.

i doubt it will collide with earth and im sure it wil be a spectacular sight.

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"Could a fly change the trajectory of a bowling ball enough to change a strike into a gutter ball?"

Yes, if the bowling ball was travelling from far enough away.

 

The problem at hand does not qualify "from far enough away". Think of trying to deflect a comet along the lines of a fly changing the trajectory of a bowling ball from a strike to a gutter ball on a foreshortened bowling alley.

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"Could a fly change the trajectory of a bowling ball enough to change a strike into a gutter ball?"

Yes, if the bowling ball was travelling from far enough away.

especially in space without being in any gravity field .

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Moreover, you are assuming that the incoming comet is reachable. It's not. The best we could do with our meager technology to intercept a comet coming on in a highly inclined, highly eccentric trajectory would be to launch a few days before impact, and that of course is far too late. Diverting an asteroid of this size on an orbit somewhat similar to Earth's orbit would require a decade or so of advance warning using today's technology. Diverting a comet: We don't have the technology, period.

I'm not exactly sure that's true, if they know the mass of the comet, it's velocity, direction and the gravitational distortion caused by the sun they can model it's trajectory very precisely as they have done to launch probes to wiz around planets to reach other planets and explore them. Tracking every comet or asteroid that we haven't found yet is hard, but if we have enough time in advanced we have the technology to propel a weight or missile fast enough to slightly change its course based on where we think the asteroid will be at a certain time. If it is highly eccentric it could get close enough to the sun to reach a huge velocity, but that's why we would try and calculate it's path before it got to the sun.

If all the planning fails we can try and use as much nukes as we have and see if that's enough. I'm not totally optimistic but I don't think we have no idea what to do either, there's definitely things we can try.

 

You missed my point. Just because we know the trajectory doesn't mean we can reach it. The delta-V needed to merely intercept an incoming comet would most likely be beyond today's technology. You mentioned nuclear technology. That requires landing on or moving with the comet. That adds even more delta-V (an unattainably high amount) to that already unattainable intercept delta-V.

 

NASA pretty much came to the same conclusion in their 2006 asteroid deflection study. They looked at deflecting a small one kilometer diameter comet with the action (e.g., nuclear explosions) one year prior to Earth impact. This is a very large time interval given that comets tend to be discovered about a year or so before perihelion. At the same time, this one year window represents a very short time interval in terms of deflection. It means that a huge delta-V (~5 meters/second) needs to be imparted to the comet. One nuke won't do it for our medium sized, 10 km diameter comet. Thousands will be needed, all in a very short time window. It's not possible.

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