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Eye's after death


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#1 Guest_gary_*

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 08:12 PM

I have spoke to a few people about the color of peoples eyes after death.
It has been said by a few people that the eye color changes.
One person said

There eyes where Brown but when I saw them 2 hours after death they had turned blue


why is this.
The best half theorys I can come up with is the loss of Pigments and the draining of the small amount of blood in the eye.
anther was that maybe if the eye had two tones the domenent color would remain?

I am guessing of course.
I would like it if anyone else has any information on this subject
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#2 fafalone

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 08:16 PM

Eye color is controlled by the presence of pigment, or the lack of it (there is no blue pigment, it's just an absense of any pigment). When you die, the body stops making it.
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#3 Guest_gary_*

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 08:33 PM

so does it matter that the eye 'lost its color'
within 2 hours this is whats mainly bothering me.

there is no blue pigment, it's just an absense of any pigment



and I thought as much to this cos babys have no color when they or born, giving the appearence of blue eyes
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#4 PogoC7

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 08:47 PM

Well, If someone always wanted to have beautiful blue eyes. Death is something to look forward too. Maybe someone can take a picture of you two hours after death and that picture can be the one people remember you by, with beautiful blue eyes.
I wish my girlfriend had blue eyes.
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#5 blike

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 08:51 PM

...

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#6 Radical Edward

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 11:43 PM

Originally posted by PogoC7
Well, If someone always wanted to have beautiful blue eyes. Death is something to look forward too. Maybe someone can take a picture of you two hours after death and that picture can be the one people remember you by, with beautiful blue eyes.
I wish my girlfriend had blue eyes.



well if you don't mind her dead....
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#7 Glider

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Posted 2 February 2003 - 11:34 AM

The colour of the eye, as defined by the colour of the iris, doesn't change post-mortem. If a person has brown eyes, this is due to a higher concentration of melanin in the iris than a person with blues eyes (as Fafalone said). However, the colour of the iris is not dependent upon the continual production of melanin. When a person with brown eyes dies, the colour of the iris remains unaffected.

The change in eye colour that you can see in the eyes of dead people is due to opacity of the cornea, aqueous humour and lense brought about by lack of oxygen. Once a person dies, they stop producing tears and blinking, and blood circulation ceases. The cornea must be moist in order that oxygen may be absorbed.

So, the iris of the individual stays whatever colour it was. However, the pupils dilate on death and if you look into the (now very large) pupils a few hours after death, you will notice a distictive blue-white 'haze'. This is the change that people report.

If you want an example, but want to avoid staring into the eyes of a dead person (which is not very pleasant), look at the eyes of a dead fish. The same thing happens there, and you will see the noticable blue-white colour in the pupil.
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#8 Piccolo

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Posted 2 February 2003 - 04:17 PM

Ok then why are newborns eyes blue, I mean they are producing oxygen right.
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#9 Glider

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Posted 3 February 2003 - 10:05 AM

In the case of neonates, it is the iris that lacks pigment. the pupils and lenses should be perfectly clear (i.e. black) very shortly after birth.

Of all animals, human babies are the most underdeveloped at birth. For example, in premature cases the liver is not fully functional and they cannot metabolise bilirubin, so they appear jaundiced and have to be placed under UV lights, which breaks the bilirubin down in the skin. The same goes for the eyes. Neonate eyes are underdeveloped and It can take a little while for the eyes of newborns to acheive their true colour.

The same can be apparent of their hair. A lot of babies that are born with hair, are born blonde. after a while, they produce sufficient melanin to acheive their true colour.
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#10 Diesel

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 05:25 PM

What is pigment ?
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#11 Glider

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 05:31 PM

In this case, it is melanin, the pigment that colours eyes brown. Really, there are no such things as 'blue eyes', just eyes that are not brown.

All shades of eye colour reflect a concentration of melanin. Brown = lots, green = less, hazel = even less, light blue = none.
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#12 wolfson

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 05:32 PM

Everyone one is born with blue eyes, and while we are on about eyes after death, as I am doing a Forensic Science i learned that the most accurate way to determine time of death was to take a sample of fluid from the eye, and calculate the value of Potassium concentration Kv.
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#13 YT2095

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 05:41 PM

does that lack of blood or rather Oxygenated blood have an effect at all?
and perhaps oxidations an decomposition of the cappiliaries play a part at all? I would imagine it would somehow, or a least a little bit.
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#14 fafalone

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 03:24 AM

Not really... the eyes are the only part of the human body that get their oxygen directly from the air rather than from blood that passes through the lungs.
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#15 Glider

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 08:30 AM

The retina is highly vascular, and the sclera is vacular, but the cornea (as Faf says) gets it oxygen from the air.
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#16 ydoaPs

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Posted 4 October 2004 - 04:37 AM

off topic question: does eye color affect vision? the iris reflects light and absorbs some. does it change your vision?
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#17 Cap'n Refsmmat

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Posted 4 October 2004 - 09:10 PM

No. The light goes through the pupil, not the iris.
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#18 ydoaPs

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Posted 4 October 2004 - 09:23 PM

what is the point of pigmentation of the iris?
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#19 Cap'n Refsmmat

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Posted 4 October 2004 - 09:32 PM

what is the point of pigmentation of the iris?

What's the point of hair color?

Who knows?
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#20 ydoaPs

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Posted 4 October 2004 - 09:41 PM

i figured that since skin color has a function, eye color might also.
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"Our integrity sells for so little, but it is all we really have. It is the very last inch of us. But within that inch we are free."-Valerie(V for Vendetta)

"For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love and whiskey."-Carl Sagan[revised]
 
"The universe is under no obligation to us not to be absurd."




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