random_soldier1337

Thinking about my career

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I've mentioned my admission to MS Nuclear Engineering in the University of Florida earlier.

 

Thing is I am a foreigner. What with all the security most countries have surrounding nuclear technology, would I be limiting myself in the number of parties I can work with? I am aware I have other career options but I am asking strictly about options in engineering.

 

I did speak of taking instrumentation and control specialization possibly earlier which from the general definition of it would seem to open up more fields than nuclear. But then again, my degree would say I did an MS in Nuclear Engineering and not something like mechanical or electrical.

Edited by random_soldier1337

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Somewhat. I mean I realize the mathematical, programming and analytical skills of a STEM person can be used in fairly available jobs like IT/business.

 

But I mean to ask, would I, as a nuclear engineer, only be available to the Indian market since there is a lot of security that most countries have surrounding nuclear technology?

 

That would severely limit job opportunities since I can only work for/with one nation.

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19 minutes ago, Prometheus said:

Would you consider working in a nuclear medicine department? I've no idea how close their work is to that of a nuclear engineer but there must be some overlap and i don't think security would be as much of an issue.

 

 

Well, the whole point was to go into fusion research. I've discussed this a fair bit and I think I my general path will be something like instrumentation and control. Most discussions make it seem like it would be applicable in many areas relying on any sort of circuitry/electrical setup, even in fusion. What do you think?

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DrP    347
29 minutes ago, random_soldier1337 said:

 

Well, the whole point was to go into fusion research.

I wanted to do that too...  When I applied to JET back in the late 90's they said that they were taking 1st Class hons degrees only...  and then there were many, many applicants for the one Ph.D. project they were running..  I  didn't bother applying in the end as I knew I was not getting a first and there was an interesting Chemistry project that caught my eye at my Uni.

I friend of mine, who was a mature student with straight As and a good 1st did apply a few years later though and got on a Ph.D. placement there through UMIST.

I don't want to burst your bubble  -  but as with a child who wants to be a space man...  what do you say?  Work hard, go to college, excel....  and maybe you might someday work in a related field that supports and drives space exploration..  but it is unlikely they will ever go into space.

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Eh, whatever. I'm burned out on all these discussions. As I said, instrumentation and control. Maybe I'll luck out and get to work closely on a fusion project. If not, there are many industries that require circuitry and automation, from automobiles to cell phones. I may switch branches altogether if my coursework is heavily leaning towards another more common branch and if the option is there.

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Klaynos    717

Tim Peake, the ESA astronaut ,told me an interesting story a few months ago. 

One of the people he knows was desperate to become an astronaut, he joined the USAF, trained as a fighter pilot, became a test pilot and applied. He failed the tryouts. 

A few years later he left the air force and retrained as a medical doctor. A couple years later NASA advertised for doctors to become astronauts to support the longer duration missions. He applied and was successful. A route to his dream that didn't even exist when he started out and one he never thought would happen. 

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Raider5678    25
6 hours ago, whocares386 said:

Just do what you want and it'll lead you to the best path for your life.

Good luck.

Nope.

Not always.

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LauraBoop    0
On 8/13/2017 at 11:09 PM, Klaynos said:

Tim Peake, the ESA astronaut ,told me an interesting story a few months ago. 

One of the people he knows was desperate to become an astronaut, he joined the USAF, trained as a fighter pilot, became a test pilot and applied. He failed the tryouts. 

A few years later he left the air force and retrained as a medical doctor. A couple years later NASA advertised for doctors to become astronauts to support the longer duration missions. He applied and was successful. A route to his dream that didn't even exist when he started out and one he never thought would happen. 

Wow, you had me search about that and I find it very inspirational.

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