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Proposed Mechanics Impossible?


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I have attached some figures and some simple mathematics that illustrate the intended mechanics. The diagnosis was that the mechanics are terminal, meaning DOA. But like all terminal diagnosis, I am seeking a second opinion. I feel that I understand Newton's Laws of motion, and nothing that I am proposing seem to violate them.

 

The scenario:

 

This is an ideal system with only gravity as an opposing force.

There is a mechanism inside a box.

The mechanism inside the box provides a horizontal Force onto an object.

The object responds to the force by accelerating in the vertically up position.

The object encounters the top of the box.

Momentum is exchanged between the object and the box.

The box responds by accelerating in the vertically up position.

 

The above scenario is said to be false. The force of the object will not move the box, no matter how much force the object has.

 

I assert that dependent on the force of the object, that it will move the box.

 

What am I not seeing to make my assertion false?

 

Correction in Proposal:

 

Fhorizontal= 56.56 N

Mechanical Proposal.pdf

Edited by David Callahan
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Have you read Edward De Bono?

 

He used to have a demonstration box something like yours, that suddenly fell over in the middle of a lecture.

Edited by studiot
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The mechanism inside the box provides a horizontal Force onto an object.

The object responds to the force by accelerating in the vertically up position.

 

 

Correction: since the slides have a 45º angle to them, the force on (and exerted by) each is both horizontal and vertical in equal contribution, i.e. the force will be normal to the surface. Thus, there is a reaction force on the slides when the mass is pushed upwards, as there must be.

 

If this was happening in free space, the box would initially move downward.

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The angle is irrelevant for the reaction force, it will be of equal magnitude as the action force upward.

 

"The third of Newton's laws of motion of classical mechanics states that forces always occur in pairs. This is related to the fact that a force results from the interaction of two objects. Every force ('action') on one object is accompanied by a 'reaction' on another, of equal magnitude but opposite direction."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reaction_(physics)

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Swansont,

 

The angle is a variable. The theta was just an arbitrary angle to demonstrate mechanics. The angle can be increased to transfer the maximum amount of force in the vertically up direction, minimalizing the reactive down force.

 

Changing the angle will just change the amount of force. It won't change the fact that there will be a reaction force.

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