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jimmydasaint

Small Man Syndrome Could Be a Myth.

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As I said, recent empirical work shows the opposite.

 

What was the population size, and what was the confidence on this conclusion that "all bullying behavior is initiated by people with high self-esteem?"

 

That sounds like what you're saying, and that doesn't appear to be a valid interpretation.

 

 

And, by the way, those references you stated were outdated came from your own source, so I'm not sure why you've chosen to make this particular argument against my challenges, but whatever.

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What's with the psychology of bullying pissing contest? iNow, SkepticLance, how tall are each of you?

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I'm taller than he is, and I only bully false representations of reality and incorrect absolute statements. You gotta problem with dat? :D

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Reference war, here we come!

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050411100940.htm

 

Quote :

 

"December 2003, Juvonen, Graham and Mark Schuster, associate professor of pediatrics in UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, reported that bullies are often popular and viewed by classmates as the "coolest" in their classes; they don't show signs of depression or social anxiety, and do not suffer from low self-esteem."

 

http://www.college.ucla.edu/news/03/juvonen.html

 

Quote :

 

"More than one in five 12-year-olds are repeatedly either bullies, victims or both, and bullies are often popular and viewed by classmates as the "coolest" in their classes, according to new UCLA research from the most comprehensive study on young adolescent bullying in an ethnically diverse, large urban setting.

 

Bullies, seven percent of the students, are psychologically strong.

 

"Bullies are popular and respected: they are considered the 'cool' kids," said Jaana Juvonen, UCLA professor of psychology, and lead author of "Bullying Among Young Adolescents: The Strong, the Weak, and the Troubled," published in the December issue of the journal Pediatrics. "They don't show signs of depression or social anxiety, and they don't feel lonely.

 

"We hope that these findings help us dispel the myth that bullies suffer from low self-esteem," Juvonen said. "Our data indicate that bullies do not need ego boosters. Unfortunately, this myth is still guiding many programs conducted in schools. Instead, we should be concerned about the popularity of bullies and how to change the peer culture that encourages bullying."

 

Of course, low self esteem is characteristic of those who become the victims of bullies. The bully feels superior and boosts that good feeling by destroying the self esteem of those he considers to be 'inferior'.

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All of that is perfectly consistent with the stance I took, the one against which you argued, that there are different types of bullying behavior and different motivations and different mindsets.

 

I appreciate you supporting your point. You have taught me about one additional mindset of some bullies in some places, but you are mistaken if you think that every bully is self-confident and has high self-esteem. Your own reference proves this point, the one I've been making for the last several posts.

 

You should take careful note of the use of the word "often" in the quotes you've shared. It doesn't say "always."

 

 

I think we've derailed this thread quite enough. I'm happy that I've made myself clear, and I will allow you to share whatever misrepresentations you want moving forward. Enjoy. :)

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Perhaps there is some ambiguity in what constitutes genuine self-esteem.

http://www.objectivistcenter.org/showcontent.aspx?ct=670&h=53

 

Branden makes a sharp distinction between genuine self-esteem and pseudo-self-esteem. Pseudo-self-esteem relies on "external" sources, such as being admired or approved by others, social status, or physical appearance. People tend to put their reliance on external sources to the extent that they are lacking in the self-directed psychological processes that constitute internal sources of self-esteem. Because external sources are not under our direct control, they cannot realistically enhance our feelings of competence. Self-esteem that depends on them is therefore insecure and under constant threat.

 

 

Moderate positive correlations exist between scores on self-reported self-esteem and scores on the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI). (A narcissistic person harbors grossly inflated opinions of his competence and his worth, regarding himself as superior to others.) Because the NPI involves self-reporting, it is subject to some of the criticisms that have been raised against the Rosenberg Scale. Researchers who sharply distinguish self-esteem from narcissism worry about the correlation between the two tests and seek better theoretical models and better measurement procedures for both phenomena.

Carolyn Morf and Frederick Rhodewalt have put forward a new model of narcissism that supports the effort to distinguish high self-esteem from vanity, self-absorption, and ego-inflation. Morf and Rhodewalt suggest that a defining characteristic of the narcissist is overdependence on social sources to affirm a grandiose sense of self. The narcissist needs other people, but only because of their instrumental value in bolstering his sense of self. Under the narcissist's grandiose exterior, therefore, is a vulnerable sense of self that is easily threatened and must be constantly supplied with affirmation.

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To Sisyphus

 

You may understand iNow better by looking at his hobby (Martial Arts). This is an activity frequently adopted by the ex victims of bullies - those of low self esteem and insecurity. By learning to kick the crap out of others, they boost their flagging self esteem. The fact that he cannot stand the fact that I do not agree with everything he says, indicates that he lacks the personal confidence that most people have, permitting them to accept lack of agreement. I think iNow must have been bullied. (Just joking!)

 

To iNow

 

If your argument is that a few bullies may be differently motivated, then I agree. Throughout I have modified my statements with words like 'typically' or 'usually'.

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IOW, "sometimes a particular reason can be ascribed to a behaviour".

 

IT'S LIKE MAGIC.

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...

Edited by iNow
Not worth it. I should know better by now...

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Here's another fun fact to throw in the mix: apparently, women prefer different height men at different points in their menstrual cycles. What fascinating creatures!

 

So really men should wear high heel shoes, for those *special occasions.

 

*When your lady friend is fertile.

 

EDIT: I seem to remember the same is said about a man's face i.e at certain points of the menstrual cycle, women prefer a masculine face and at other points they prefer a more feminine looking face. I'll try and find a link.

 

yoink...http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/376321.stm

Edited by Snail

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Yeah, statistically a lot of factors seem to be weighed differently at different points in the cycle. And it's not just women that are affected - there was thatstudy that showed female strippers earn twice the tips during their most fertile period as their least fertile.

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Do short men tip more than tall men? :D

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Yeah, statistically a lot of factors seem to be weighed differently at different points in the cycle. And it's not just women that are affected - there was thatstudy that showed female strippers earn twice the tips during their most fertile period as their least fertile.

 

It's studies such as that, that make me wonder why I chose physics as a subject. I doubt the angular momentum of a nipple tassel, is useful information...or is it ?

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/lifestyleMolt/idUSL1013303620080410

 

Sorry for going off topic, and descending into smut. (Sisyphus started it)

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Do short men tip more than tall men? :D

 

Yes and no. We tip the strippers more than tall dudes, but we don't tip over as much as the tall dudes.

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But why would you want to give a tip to the tall dudes instead of the strippers?

 

 

As for the lower center of gravity, yeah... I suppose you're right.

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