Jump to content
King E

Soft question. What are the markings on a standard metre rule.

Recommended Posts

In other words what is the scale of Standard Metre Rule?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Normally centimetres and millimetres. What would you expect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Strange said:

Normally centimetres and millimetres. What would you expect?

Some are marked in inches as well. Are they standard as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, King E said:

Some are marked in inches as well. Are they standard as well?

Well, only in countries like the UK and USA. I doubt you would find one in the rest of the world.

Don't know about Canada or Australia, though.

 

213348_1.jpg

I have one that also has points and picas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
58 minutes ago, King E said:

In other words what is the scale of Standard Metre Rule?

I suppose it depends what you mean by 'standard'

There are two types of standard defined

Line standards  -  as appearing on most ordinary rulers for drawing

End standards  -  often used for metre rules for industry

The difference is that the end points (zero and one metre) are defined between lines near each end of the rule or between the flush, squared off ends of the rule.

So end standards are exactly one mtere long, line standards are a little longer.

I am just waiting for my camera to charge to post a photo of the difference.

In both cases the scales will be subdivided a Strange has already noted.

So here is the picture

rulers.jpg.122b5cec89b553825b55617f1a1026e2.jpg

 

The brass rule is an end standard.
Note the countersunk hole for screwing it to a drapers or rope sellers cutting table.
It does not come out very well but you can just see the ministry calibration stamped into the metal, between the 1cm and 2cm marks.
This is the crown symbol and the date 10/1974

The plastic rule is a line standard for laying flat on a sheet of drawing paper.

Edited by studiot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no longer a "standard" metre rule, we have a different definition of a metre these days.
However, when there was a single standard- (all the others are copies) it looked pretty much the same as this one.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_metre#/media/File:US_National_Length_Meter.JPG

It has, so I understand, two marks on it about 1cm from each end. The bottom of  middles of those marks are 1 metre apart.

 



 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.