Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
StringJunky

'Living fossils' and DNA stability

Recommended Posts

I guess that would refer to tadpole shrimps? They also show high diversification despite overall morphological conservation. I did not come across the shark thingy, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Ten oz said:

Perhaps not this time though. Living fossil is a superficial title and we all agree. 

The OP is asks about DNA. We don't have testable DNA from a hundred million years ago. 

1

Thanks, I learned this time though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

When I think of "living fossil" my first thought are cycads. Now the cycads alive today are obviously different from the cycads known from the fossil record, BUT there are more species known from fossil than are alive today. Predate flowering plants on earth.

Since reading Tim Low's latest ("Where Song Began - Australia's birds and how they changed the world"), I also think of the Australian lyre bird. Not really a living fossil, but certainly a direct descendant of possibly the first song bird.

In these discussions we need to reconsider the term "primative" - where it is thought to mean poor and rudimentary. In many ways these species have extraordinary strength in survival.

Edited by druS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.