fresh

are sweet potato and yam suitable for diabetics ?

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2 minutes ago, iNow said:

Balance really. I’m type 1 so take insulin no matter what I eat. Must adjust for carb amounts, activity level, illness, etc. but most times am just trying to determine about how many carbs I’m eating. Cooking method has never once been a consideration for me after decades. 

Right. 

1 hour ago, fresh said:

sweet potato is different from potato.

Put into practice, test your blood sugar respectively after steaming sweet potatoes for 15 minutes,25 minutes, and 30 minutes or even longer . You will find out the longer you steam it, the higher the GI it has.

same with rice and potato.

the results of your blood sugar is what you should believe.

However you do it, if you are diabetic, let your resultant blood sugar levels be your guide on how much to have. I think someone with Type 1, like iNow, has a pretty good idea of the do's and don'ts.

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My mom has blood sugar problems. She always tests her blood sugar level 2hours after meal. She knows how she cooks could lower the GI of some food.

try the results by yourself for type 2 diabetes.

Moreover, in winter blood sugar level is often higher than in summer. No idea why?

 

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7 minutes ago, fresh said:

My mom has blood sugar problems. She always tests her blood sugar level 2hours after meal. She knows how she cooks could lower the GI of some food.

try the results by yourself for type 2 diabetes.

Moreover, in winter blood sugar level is often higher than in summer. No idea why?

 

A7BBC220-318D-4931-A451-87F749D225F7.jpeg

It's probably not how it's cooked but how long it's cooked, which may break down the cells more completely, which may increase the available nutrients and raise the GI. Instant mash granules will likely have all or more of the cells broken than whole potatos, which allows faster uptake of the nutrients and, hence, a higher GI.

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By the way, is it the rumor that yam contains something like progesterone, and increases estrogen level ?

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On 2/13/2018 at 10:32 PM, StringJunky said:

It's probably not how it's cooked but how long it's cooked, which may break down the cells more completely, which may increase the available nutrients and raise the GI.

I believe it is actually more due to the thermal treatment of the starch (the dominant sugar polymer in potatoes). Depending on treatment gelatinization occurs, which increases its propensity to be broken down to glucose during digestion. The tricky bit is that amount and composition is already different in potato varieties and quite different in sweet potatoes (which are a different species entirely). In  sweet potatoes the GI has been found to vary between 40 (boiled) and 90 (baked), which is roughly comparable to most potato variants (ranging from 50-80).

54 minutes ago, fresh said:

By the way, is it the rumor that yam contains something like progesterone, and increases estrogen level ?

A) Diosgesin is found in low concentrations in wild yams (not the common cultivar)

B) The concentrations are so low, you would not be able to eat enough to have any noticeable effects.

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if your grandmother and mom are both diabetics, what's the odds you will become diabetic in future ? why does mother pass it to daughter ? why daughter didn't get the gene from dad who doesn't have any blood sugar problem ? 

any way to prevent it ? is type 2 diabetes preventable ?

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24 minutes ago, fresh said:

if your grandmother and mom are both diabetics, what's the odds you will become diabetic in future ? why does mother pass it to daughter ? why daughter didn't get the gene from dad who doesn't have any blood sugar problem ? 

any way to prevent it ? is type 2 diabetes preventable ?

 

Quote

HERITABILITY OF T2D (Type 2 Diabetes)

Estimates for the heritability of T2DM range from 20%-80% and evidence for heritability comes from a variety of population, family, and twin-based studies[4,5]. The lifetime risk of developing T2D is 40% for individuals who have one parent with T2D and 70% if both parents are affected[6]. First degree relatives of individuals with T2D are about 3 times more likely to develop the disease than individuals without a positive family history of the disease[7]. The concordance rate in monozygotic twins is about 70% whereas the concordance in dizygotic twins has been observed to be only 20%-30%[8]. The observed familial risk is higher when studies are restricted to parents in the 35-60 year age range, indicating the greater role played by environmental factors in those who develop diabetes late in life[9]. It should be noted that a significant proportion of this heritability reflects heritability of obesity rather than diabetes, obesity being a major driver of T2D in every populationhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3746083/

Keeping your weight down should reduce your risk.

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41 minutes ago, fresh said:

thank you,stringjunky

My pleasure. To emphasise its relationship to weight, i found this:  http://www.obesity.org/content/weight-diabetes

Quote

How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes?
There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or have obesity. People who are overweight or have obesity have added pressure on their body's ability to use insulin to properly control blood sugar levels, and are therefore more likely to develop diabetes. The number of diabetes cases among American adults increased by a third during the 1990s, and additional increases are expected. This rapid increase in the occurrence of diabetes is mostly attributed to the growing prevalence of obesity in the United States.

What can you do to prevent diabetes?
Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. Studies have found that lifestyle changes and small amounts of weight loss in the range of 5-10% can prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes among high-risk adults. Lifestyle interventions including diet and moderate to intense physical activity (such as walking for 150 minutes per week) were used in these studies to produce small amounts of weight loss. The development of diabetes was reduced by 40% to 60% during these studies, which lasted three to six years. Preventing weight gain, increasing activity levels and working toward small amounts of weight loss if you are overweight can have a big impact on the likelihood that you will develop diabetes in the future. Thus far, weight management is the best thing you can do to prevent the development of diabetes.

You might find this useful: https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing/index.html

Edited by StringJunky

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39 minutes ago, fresh said:

What is your BMI ? Mine is 19. My mom’s  is 21.

Are you both skinny? I'm about 28 atm. My weight has been piling on... been lazy. TBH, I'm enjoying the novelty of being overweight because for most of my life - I'm 56 -  I've been super skinny - 60Kg - but being cured of hep c and giving up smoking has altered things substantially to the point I'm currently 88Kg.

Edited by StringJunky

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I'm Type 2, good control with metformin. I love sweat potato fries, baked crispy, and dipped in catsup. As long as I don't overeat, my diabetes is OK with the fries.

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1 hour ago, fresh said:

BMI between19-21 is not skinny at all... it’s fit.

OK. :) Has your mum always been around that BMI?

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12 hours ago, StringJunky said:

OK. :) Has your mum always been around that BMI?

Years ago her BMI was  24.

Edited by fresh

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