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Mendelejev

The Periodic Table

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I once wrote out a version of the periodic table with the f-block in it's correct position. I made a mistake in placing Sc and Y, though. Despite that it taught me an awful lot about what the periodic table really shows and how. If I find it, perhaps i'll scan it in.

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Check out ADOMAH PT, the only periodic table that allows direct reading of the primary quantum number "n" for all periods and strictly follows all four quantum numbers n, l, ml and ms, as well as the Madelung Rule:

 

http://www.perfectperiodictable.com

 

While there, please click on "3D Concept" and the "User's Guide". It is quite revealing !

 

P.S. It is also listed at http://www.meta-synthesis.com/webbook/35_pt/pt.html#ADOMAH among other most interesting formulations.

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question about the ADOMAH table:

 

on the website it states that the spd and f blocks represent equally spaces slices of a tetrahedron.

 

Does the g-block fit into the tetrahedron? if it does, is that a coincidence or because of some equation which describes the relationship between the sizes of the sub-shells as being equivalent to the sizes of slices of a tetrahedron?

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Yes, Block 'g' also fits the same pattern beginning with element No. 121. Only it would make ADOMAH PT 18 elements (or 9 units) taller.

 

You are absolutely right. There is the relationship of the sizes of the sub shells to the size of the tetrahedron. The tetrahedron shown on http://www.perfectperiodictable.com site has edge equal to 9 units. Therefore, there could be only 4 rectangles possible (if only prime numbers are used): 1x8 (s-block), 3x6 (p-block), 5x4(d-block) and 7x2(f-block). There could be no other rectangles possible, given that only prime numbers are used. (green slices also assume the same dimensions if the tetrahedron edge is odd number, only in opposite order).

 

Now, try to make edge of the tetrahedron E=10 units long. We would have following combinations, for "red" slices (spaced 2 units appart as measured along the edges):

 

1x9 (s-block), 3x7 (p-block), 5x5(d-block), 7x3(f-block) and 9x1(g-block), These are the "red layers", representing the blocks.

The green layers would be 8x2, 6x4, 4x6 and 2x8 (just spacers, or matrix, or, perhaps the neutrons within the nucleus).

You can see that g-block is 18 elements long (where 1 unit is a pair of elements).

 

If edge is E=11 units, then red layers would be:

1x10 (s-block), 3x8(p), 5x6(d), 7x4(f) and 9x2(block-g, 18 element tall, total of 36 elemets).

 

Therefore, if tetrahedron has edge "E" and rectangles have sides "a" and "b", where side "a" is always odd and "b" can be either even or odd, the dimensions of the subshell blocks follow rule: a + b = E (using only prime numbers). Number of slices, or sub shells: NOS = E/2 with no reminder.

 

All other blocks, such as 'h', 'i', 'j' ... can also be derived in the same manner by making tetrahedron edge E = 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 ... units.

 

This is not a coincidence: The Periodic Law can be completely understood in terms of the tetrahedral geometry.

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A cute table, but it looks like they just took chunks off the periodic table and spaced them out... same information, slightly clearer grouping, but less space efficient (and the table is already a monster for size).

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I like it. From a teacher's point of view the IUPAC PT is a bit dodgy, since we talk about periodic trends and the PT's ability to describe the electron configuration of any element, but there are exceptions and confusing rule-additions as you go further down the table, and the f-block is almost never seen where it should be.

 

The new one is simpler and I think many students would understand it better and quicker than the IUPAC one.

 

I dont think its necessary to put it inside a tetrahedron, though, although it's interesting.

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You can find all sorts of periodic table formulations HERE.

 

It is quite interesting. Check it out!

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The periodic table on this site is pretty cool.

 

http://www.ptable.com

or

http://www.dayah.com/periodic

 

You can change the temperature and see the elements in their forms Solids, Liquids, and Gases.

 

You can see the temperature in three different systems

-Kelvin

-Celsius

-Fahrenheit

 

There is also a search feature, you can see the electron shells, and will enlarge the element your cursor is going over.

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is provided for free at: http://www.dayah.com/periodic/ . All the specific information about each element such as melting points,electron configurations, useful and interesting aspects of each element is a simple matter of clicking onto that element. A very usefull tool for any student or professional. Ends the need for searching the web or digging through textbooks to find answers concerning the elements. I just added it to my favorites list. ...dr.syntax

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This one on the U-Tube video gets filled in as the song plays. Always liked the song, was strangely pleasing to see the elements filled in as the song plays. :)

 

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hi. I need a periodic table which contains the elements, the electronegative,Atom Radius, ion energy and rate of reaction & e.t.c , but I don't need they're numbers, I want it to show how these properties change in the table (for ex. the Radius increases in a group from top to bottom.)

Thank U;)

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hi. I need a periodic table which contains the elements, the electronegative,Atom Radius, ion energy and rate of reaction & e.t.c , but I don't need they're numbers, I want it to show how these properties change in the table (for ex. the Radius increases in a group from top to bottom.)

Thank U;)

 

Find a good college level general chemistry textbook. A good textbook will cover pretty much all the periodic trends that matter. I think you'll be hard pressed to find a periodic table with rate of reaction though, that would be different for every element and every other reactant. So that periodic table would have to be at least one hundred feet across if not thousands.

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