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markosheehan

functions

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ajb    1567

You should think about solutions to

 

[math] x^2 + 3 - y =0[/math]

 

Can this be solved for any real y? Or can you find at least one y where this equation cannot be solved?

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ajb    1567

If x is real, [latex]x^2+3 \ge 3[/latex]

I was hoping markosheehan would reach such a conclusion by himself... I think this question could be homework.

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blue89    19

is the function x²+3 surjective for real numbers. how do you test for surjectivity in general?

 

May I ask what that means ,"surjective" ??

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HallsofIvy    41

 

May I ask what that means ,"surjective" ??

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "surjective" (also called "from A onto B") if and only if, for every y in B there exist x in A such that f(x)= y.

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "injective" (also called "one to one") if and only if, whenever f(x)= f(y), x= y.

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "bijective" if and only if it is both surjective and injective (for every y in B, there exist one and only one x in A such that f(x)= y). A function is "invertible" if and only if it is bijective.

Edited by HallsofIvy
  • Upvote 2

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studiot    1131

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "surjective" (also called "from A onto B") if and only if, for every y in B there exist x in A such that f(x)= y.

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "injective" (also called "one to one") if and only if, whenever f(x)= f(y), x= y.

 

A function, f, from set A to set B, is said to be "bijective" if and only if it is both surjective and injective (for every y in B, there exist one and only one x in A such that f(x)= y). A function is "invertible" if and only if it is bijective.

 

Nice and complete +1

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