geordief

The Big Bang Theory, Expansion/Inflation plus "Explosion"

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Area54    102
17 hours ago, beecee said:

While it's true we don't know about "all there is," I believe that our assumptions about the isotropic and homogeneous nature of the observable universe, can be logically extrapolated to the universe as a whole that evolved from the BB.

True, but if we question those assumptions then the extrapolation is no longer logical. (Which opens up even more ground for 'fun speculating')

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Airbrush    157
21 hours ago, beecee said:

I believe that our assumptions about the isotropic and homogeneous nature of the observable universe, can be logically extrapolated to the universe as a whole that evolved from the BB............. 

But hey! it's fun speculating within the bounds of science and the scientific methodology! We never know where it may lead.

Yes, but what if our universe, or big bang, is only isotropic and homogeneous out to a finite distance?  What if our observable diameter of nearly 100 Billion LY gives us a skewed idea of a much larger universe, or big bang?  What does it look like about a Trillion LY out?  A googol LY out?  Or to infinity?

Fun speculating! 

Edited by Airbrush

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beecee    78
6 hours ago, Area54 said:

True, but if we question those assumptions then the extrapolation is no longer logical. (Which opens up even more ground for 'fun speculating')

 

2 hours ago, Airbrush said:

Yes, but what if our universe, or big bang, is only isotropic and homogeneous out to a finite distance?  What if our observable diameter of nearly 100 Billion LY gives us a skewed idea of a much larger universe, or big bang?  What does it look like about a Trillion LY out?  A googol LY out?  Or to infinity?

Fun speculating! 

 

:) But don't we need a reason for questioning?

http://abyss.uoregon.edu/~js/cosmo/lectures/lec05.html

"Observations to date support the idea that the Universe is both isotropic and homogeneous. Both facts are linked to what is called the cosmological principle. The cosmological principle derives from the Copernican Principle but has no foundation in any particular physical model or theory, i.e. it can not be `proved' in a mathematical sense. However, it has been supported by numerous observations of our Universe and has great weight from purely empirical grounds".

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Area54    102
47 minutes ago, beecee said:

 

:) But don't we need a reason for questioning?

I don't think we ever need a reason to question assumptions.

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