Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Ways to keep Carbonated drinks from going "flat"??


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 427cobra

427cobra

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • LocationNew Zealand

Posted 10 June 2005 - 03:27 AM

Hi

I am new on this forum. For my science fair, I am considering devising ways to keep carbonated, bottled (soft drinks) from going "flat", or, basically losing the bubbles.

So, for my question. Do you guys have any ideas, or things that I can do?? It can be anything, but preferably not too complicated, and possibly somthing I can engineer or build.

I look forward to hearing your Ideas!!! :confused:
  • 0

#2 Crash

Crash

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 705 posts
  • LocationAuckland NZ

Posted 10 June 2005 - 05:20 AM

keep it closed
  • 0
www.what-the-funk.com

#3 H2SO4

H2SO4

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 683 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 June 2005 - 05:47 AM

keep it closed


Funny, crash.

About the carbonated thing...


iM NOT SURE THATS POSSIBLE WITHOUT MAKING THE DRINK HAZARDOUS TO HIMAN CONCUMPTION. i HATE CAPS lock.
  • 0

#4 427cobra

427cobra

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • LocationNew Zealand

Posted 10 June 2005 - 06:59 AM

You know what I hate?? SMART ALECS!!! Just kidding. I dont want to change the ingredients or contents of the drink, just make something (some sort of attatchment) that fits onto the bottle to stop it losing the bubbles!!! :eek:
  • 0
:cool: 427 COBRA :eek:

#5 H2SO4

H2SO4

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 683 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 June 2005 - 07:15 AM

Well, dont they make those things you screw onto bottles that you pump to keep the pressure up so it doesnt gradulaly go flat. I dont imagine this would work though.
  • 0

#6 YT2095

YT2095

    Chemistry Expert

  • Resident Experts
  • 16,959 posts

Posted 10 June 2005 - 09:14 AM

I`ve heard that leaving a metal spoon in a carbonated drink slows down the going "Flat" process, however this could entirely be a myth as I`ve not tested it.

keeping it in the fridge would be a more reasonable method and obviously with the lid tightly on.
  • 0

#7 BenSon

BenSon

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 535 posts
  • LocationSydney

Posted 10 June 2005 - 01:09 PM

We did this AGES ago in chem and I'll see if i can remeber it.
The CO2 is in equilibrium with dissolved carbonic acid. You want to increase the pressure as the equilbrium will shift to oppose the change and dissolve more gas. The dissolving process is (if memory serves) exothermic so once again if you lower the temperature then it will resist the change and dissolve more gas. So keep it cold and pressurised, thats your best bet.

~Scott
  • 0

#8 akcapr

akcapr

    Protist

  • Senior Members
  • 994 posts
  • Locationwoodinville, washington

Posted 10 June 2005 - 06:46 PM

keeping it cold will definatel keep it from losing carbonation, hence why pop is usually stored cold. also i heard adding milk to pop keeps it from fizzing (or is it the other way around?). as for an attachment you could make one that increases pressure in the bottle which will keep more co2 dissolved.
  • 0
:)

#9 Tommio

Tommio

    Quark

  • Senior Members
  • 34 posts
  • LocationUK -East Anglia

Posted 10 June 2005 - 07:11 PM

I thought it was stored cold because noone likes warm fizzy drinks!

Sorry - nothing valuble to contribute, but the consencious seems to go for pressure and BenSon's science
  • 0

#10 H2SO4

H2SO4

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 683 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 June 2005 - 08:16 PM

keeping it cold will definatel keep it from losing carbonation, hence why pop is usually stored cold. also i heard adding milk to pop keeps it from fizzing (or is it the other way around?). as for an attachment you could make one that increases pressure in the bottle which will keep more co2 dissolved.




I already mentioned an attachment thing that they already made. Um, tommlo, why does your ranking just say "registered user"?
  • 0

#11 Crodley

Crodley

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 9 posts

Posted 20 June 2005 - 01:23 AM

Hmmmm just curious, if getting the drink colder slows down the process what happens if it gets frozen? Does it reatin it's "fizzyness" fully when thawed? If I recall right when I've drank pop (yes, "pop" is a midwest thing, heh so "soda" if you're not from here) that was frozen once it tasted different, though that could be just my mind playing tricks on me. :)
Crodley
  • 0

#12 Lance

Lance

    Organism

  • Senior Members
  • 1,704 posts
  • LocationDeserted Island

Posted 20 June 2005 - 01:38 AM

Try pressurizing it with a CO2 cannister.
  • 0
Marvin: I am at a rough estimate thirty billion times more intelligent than you. Let me give you an example. Think of a number, any number.
Zem: Er, five.
Marvin: Wrong. You see?

#13 BenSon

BenSon

    Molecule

  • Senior Members
  • 535 posts
  • LocationSydney

Posted 20 June 2005 - 10:58 AM

Hmmmm just curious, if getting the drink colder slows down the process what happens if it gets frozen? Does it reatin it's "fizzyness" fully when thawed? If I recall right when I've drank pop (yes, "pop" is a midwest thing, heh so "soda" if you're not from here) that was frozen once it tasted different, though that could be just my mind playing tricks on me. :)
Crodley

Well what I was talking about before in post #7 is only in a closed system. If the cola was left to freeze without being contained then the CO2 would escape and once the temperature normalised it would not be able to redissolve it. However if the system is kept closed then once to temperature pressure ect was returned to normal then the cola should be the same. As for taste well I have no idea but if I had to put money on it I'd bet it was just your mind playing tricks on you or it had still not returned to equilbrium.

~Scott
  • 0

#14 zyncod

zyncod

    Atom

  • Senior Members
  • 374 posts

Posted 21 June 2005 - 08:52 AM

Put some dry ice in there. That's what I do with sodas that I leave in the fridge at the lab that have gone flat, given that I have access to lots of dry ice. It gets them ice cold and fizzy. Just don't close the cap (or it will explode) or drink it until the dry ice has melted (or you'll freeze your larynx/esophagus).
  • 0

#15 Yumeji

Yumeji

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 4 posts

Posted 22 June 2005 - 04:56 AM

Seltzer bottle would do the trick--mainly it would just recarbonate it though, not preseve the carbon that was initially there to begin with.
  • 0

#16 427cobra

427cobra

    Lepton

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • LocationNew Zealand

Posted 22 June 2005 - 05:14 AM

So what your saying is, the cola wonít lose its "fizzyness" or carbonation, when frozen, but the freezing process affects the TASTE but nothing else???

Perhaps I should scrap the whole "inventing a gadeget" idea, and see if freezing/keeping it cool works. Also the question should have been, How do you keep carboanted drinks from going "flat" when OPENED?? (I forgot the "when opened" part).

Just so you guys know, I am only 14 so don't get too complicated, OK??!!

We have been learning all about particles and matter in class, so would I be right in saying, that when the particles (The CO2 or "bubble" particles) are chilled/ frozen, they lose energy (and when frozen, cannot move freely) so thatís why they don't escape as quickly or when frozen they don't escape at all???

Am I correct???

Also, can you get a device that can measure the amount of gas in a liquid???

And if the cola lost the fizz could you "re-fizz" it by pressurizing it with CO2 (or basically adding in some more CO2???

Cos, there is a stage (during manufacturing??) when the cola is not carbonated, right??? So when the cola loses its carbonation (is that actually a real word??!!) couldn't you just use the same process, and re-carbonate it???

Finally, BenSon, when you say a "closed system"(post 13 on this thread), do you mean, if the bottle was not opened???

Sorry if I sound dumb, and if I have gone on for ages!!!!
  • 0
:cool: 427 COBRA :eek:

#17 emcelhannon

emcelhannon

    Meson

  • Senior Members
  • 101 posts
  • LocationLexington KY

Posted 8 February 2010 - 10:49 PM

Does the surface area against the air in the bottle affect things?
  • 0

#18 CaptainPanic

CaptainPanic

    Usually himself

  • Moderators
  • 4,732 posts
  • LocationThe little swamp at the end of the river Rhine

Posted 11 February 2010 - 01:09 PM

You just have to pump CO2 into the top of the bottle.

If you leave the bottle closed, CO2 in the liquid is going to reach equilibrium with the gas inside the bottle. So, whatever you do, you will always lose some CO2.

The only way to prevent that, is to have CO2 already in the gas phase (the little we have in our air is not enough).
  • 0
Veni, vidi, modeli - I came, I saw, and I modeled it

#19 tomgwyther

tomgwyther

    Atom

  • Senior Members
  • 510 posts
  • LocationNew Forest UK

Posted 11 February 2010 - 04:50 PM

Simple, squeeze the bottle.


Carbonated drinks stay carbonated because there is a layer of Co2 in the bottle, Between the liquid surface and the bottle cap, the same applies to beer kegs.
In the case of the beer keg, we inject a mixture of 30% Co2 and 70% nitrogen into the keg (Beer naturally produces Co2 but this process helps a lot.

In the absence of a 70:30 gassing system, try this.
Pour your drink, then squeeze the bottle so the liquid is nearly at the bottle neck and the air is squeezed out, then screw the cap on tight. it has the same effect.

(Doesn't work too well when the bottle is nearly empty)
  • 0


What am I trying to say? What words will express it? What image or idiom will make it clearer? Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? Could I put it more shortly? Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly?

When I was born I had no concept of race, nationality or religion... And I still don't.


#20 rogerxd45

rogerxd45

    Meson

  • Senior Members
  • 164 posts

Posted 11 February 2010 - 05:16 PM

Well, dont they make those things you screw onto bottles that you pump to keep the pressure up so it doesnt gradulaly go flat. I dont imagine this would work though.


it helps since every time you open it and reclose it the soda has to build up pressure again untill it reaches equilibrium.

by building up the pressure first prevents the soda from doing it by itself.

but it will still go flat after a while
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users