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alpha2cen

Is the photon carrier more important than photon?

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I have a simple question

 

Where the first photons were created? Inside the first generation of stars? or at the beginning, when electromagnetism was created?

 

Is the photon carrier more important than photon? When photon carrying system is built?

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A photon is the carrier particle for the Electromagnetic force. Quite the same as Gluons are the carrier particles for the Strong Nuclear force.

 

In the extremely early universe, all 4 universal forces (Gravity, Strong/Weak Nuclear, and Electromagnetic) were unified into 1 signle force. As symmetry breaking occured (within the first fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a second after the Big Bang), one by one the forces split off from each other, resulting in 4 distinct forces to govern the physical universe.

It is widely accepted that Gravity was the first the separate, followed by the Strong Nuclear, then the Weak Nuclear forces. It would have been the latter symmetry breaking that created the EMF, and hence the propogation of photons.

 

Note that this was prior to the existence of any baryonic matter (i.e protons, neutrons..). As for the the first 'atoms', it wasnt until around 380,000 years AFTER the Big Bang, when the temperature of the Universe has cooled to around 4,000K that it was cool enough for atoms to be able to condense. These newly forms atoms were then able to snare the rogue electrons flying around the cosmos, and create the first Hydrogen atoms. With the fog of electrons now thinner, photons were able to travel alot further before being absorbed, and hence the Universe ceased to be opaque for the first time since the beginning.

 

And as for the first generation of stars would have been a considerable amount of time even after this; the newly formed atoms would need to condense into large enough clumps to initiate the gradual building of material necessary to make a star. It would need to have a large enough size/mass the ignite, and commence fusion....and considering the temperature of the Universe was around 4,000K when the Universe was 380,000 years old, which is comparable to the surface temperature of a star, again it would have been a considerable amount of time after this before the first stars ignited.

 

So in short, no, the first photons did not appear along with the first generation of stars.,

Short length visible waves did not appear. But, long length electromagnetic waves appeared.

photon-trans.jpg

Edited by alpha2cen

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The something, which makes the light travel to the speed of light?

 

How do you "build" that?

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How do you "build" that?

Was it built right after Big Bang?

If that kind of system did not exist, huge amount of micro Black Hole might be generated.

Such system makes the energy density per unit volume not be high?

 

Photon carrier concept can easily explain many things.

1) Low temperature(below 10K)radiation.

2) Particle wave duality.

3) Constancy of the speed of light.

4) Easily explaining the energy transfer between the light to molecules.

(light to molecules, light to electron orbit, light to nucleus)

5) Micro Black Hole rarity.

etc..

Edited by alpha2cen

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I am of the opinion that the medium through which photons travel is a type of electromagnetic energy itself, composed of long wavelength photons in a state of flux and equilibrium. This energy behaves as "virtual" energy because self-interference prevents it from permanently imparting energy. The carrier is referred to as "vacuum energy", and has a far higher energy density than matter.

 

My view is that in the absence of a medium, a photon would travel infinitely fast, or from a different perspective variations in density of the vacuum energy would be like curved space. In the absence of vacuum energy, the entire universe would be much smaller.

Edited by Anders Hoveland

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I am of the opinion that the medium through which photons travel is a type of electromagnetic energy itself, composed of long wavelength photons in a state of flux and equilibrium. This energy behaves as "virtual" energy because self-interference prevents it from permanently imparting energy. The carrier is referred to as "vacuum energy", and has a far higher energy density than matter.

 

My view is that in the absence of a medium, a photon would travel infinitely fast, or from a different perspective variations in density of the vacuum energy would be like curved space. In the absence of vacuum energy, the entire universe would be much smaller.

 

Everyone has an opinion.

 

In this case it's word salad put together incorrectly.

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I am of the opinion that the medium through which photons travel is a type of electromagnetic energy itself, composed of long wavelength photons in a state of flux and equilibrium. This energy behaves as "virtual" energy because self-interference prevents it from permanently imparting energy. The carrier is referred to as "vacuum energy", and has a far higher energy density than matter.

 

My view is that in the absence of a medium, a photon would travel infinitely fast, or from a different perspective variations in density of the vacuum energy would be like curved space. In the absence of vacuum energy, the entire universe would be much smaller.

 

You shouldn't air your personal alternative ideas in the proper science sections; it confuses novices.

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