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cogujada

Chem Engineering or Chemistry?

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Hey guys. Joigus and Studiot might remember me :)

I'm here because I have a question (not a doubt ;) ) 

Well, let me Introduce myself. I'm 18 years old, I study chem eng (first year, I'm a Freshman hahaha) in Madrid (so maybe my English is a bit weird, so, please, correct me in any errors you might observe). I've been having doubts about what to study since I was 15 years old. Last year (my last year in high school) I reduced my options to only two. Chemical Engineering and Chemistry. I tried to research as much as I could, but I lacked time, so I entered Chem (it was a very hard decision).

It's not that I don't like the Subjects, I love them. But I don't know if I'm going to like the work. I've been reading and I've seen that the knowledge of a chem eng about chemistry are very very poor (they know about Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Processes, etc). The work is repetitive, not very interesting... And i'm quite worried.

Firstly, I don't know if changing to Chemistry would be a good option (I wouldn't lose any year, because, at least in Spain, those subjects that you pass and are common to other subjects on other degrees don't need to be studied again). What really puts me back is that maybe I won't like as much the subjects (or maybe yes, who knows). I think the subjects in chem eng are much more practical (I mean practical not in laboratory, but in paper, there's much more about calculating, drawing, thinking, reasoning, etc. than in chemistry). 

But if I stay at chem eng, maybe, I don't enjoy the career I develop, you know? I've seen that chemists have much more offers, much more enjoyable, non-repetitive works etc.

 

What do you guys think. Should I stay, or should I change?

You can ask for more information about my degree, what I like, etc.

Cheers!

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1 hour ago, cogujada said:

What do you guys think. Should I stay, or should I change?

You can ask for more information about my degree, what I like, etc

Deja vu !

When I first went to University, I wanted to carry on with Chemistry, Maths and Physics, but Chemistry was my main subject.
I was rather ill advised but I did find out that Chemistry was short on the Mathematics side so I tried to 'hedge my bets' by applying for 3 courses in Chemistry and 3 in Chemical Engineering.
In those day we had to apply for 6 and finally choose 1 after the school exam results.
I went for Chemistry which proved to be a bad decision for me.
Subsequently I went back and did Applied Maths , then Civil Engineering then postgrad in Marine Geophysics and Geodesy, also working.
So my perspective is unusual.

But I symphathise with your dilemma.

Yes there are well paid jobs (and poorly paid ones) in Chemistry (especially Pharmacy) but that is also true of Chemical Engineering.

But please tell us what part of Chemistry you did well at and found enjoyable at School ?

I have always been more interested in Physical and Analytical Chemistry than organic or inorganic or bio Chemistry.
That is even though I made a very ham fisted Analytical Chemist.

 

 

 

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All depends on how far you intend to take your studies.

With a BSc in Chemistry, your job opportunities will be limited to 'glorified test tube washer'.
Pharmacy, as Studiot has suggested, involves many more years of study.

A BSc in Chem Eng, on the other hand, will still start off 'not very interesting', but opens up several more options as you gain experience.
In a typical Chemical Company, all decision makers, from superintendent to plant managers, are former Chem Engineers, with a couple of training courses in Management. That ring opens a lot of doors that are off-limits to others.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, MigL said:

All depends on how far you intend to take your studies.

With a BSc in Chemistry, your job opportunities will be limited to 'glorified test tube washer'.
Pharmacy, as Studiot has suggested, involves many more years of study.

A BSc in Chem Eng, on the other hand, will still start off 'not very interesting', but opens up several more options as you gain experience.
In a typical Chemical Company, all decision makers, from superintendent to plant managers, are former Chem Engineers, with a couple of training courses in Management. That ring opens a lot of doors that are off-limits to others.

Mrs Thatcher had a BSc in Chemistry.

But there is a lot of sound sense in what you say.

:)

Edited by studiot

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Posted (edited)

If you are willing to do something other than Chemistry with a Chemistry degree, that's fine.
There are no downsides to knowledge.

I myself, have a Physics Degree, but work with chemicals.
( and if I had a Chem Eng degree, I would get a pay cut )

PS:  I bet you wish you had M Thatcher back now, don't you :) !

Edited by MigL

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6 minutes ago, MigL said:

PS:  I bet you wish you had M Thatcher back now, don't you

I dunno I think Boris has a better hair do.

But interestingly the Chief Pharmacist at a big hospital in th UK will earn more than the Prime Minister.

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Posted (edited)

In Canada a Pharmacist has at least 4 more years of study after a BSc.
( typical, as most specialize after their initial degree )

Oh, and I wish the US had R Reagan back instead of D Trump,
( D Trump does NOT have better hair )

Edited by MigL

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I've got degrees in Chemical Engr (B Sc) and Nuclear Science (M) so I will toss in my thoughts.  However, you need to realize that I am retired, and entered the Chemical Engineering field 50 years ago.  Things do change.

The primary benefit of Chemical Engineering when I took my degree was that I had to study both the pure science (mostly chemistry, but also physics) and applications and to some extent project management.  This meant my pure science background was somewhat less, but my ability to translate into practical uses was maybe a little stronger.  In my case, this gave me a great deal of flexibility to take on different types of engineering as opportunities presented themselves.  I was able to work in plant design and construction, project management, synergy projects (taking the outputs from many engineering disciplines and pulling them into a complete package) and even a little mechanical and electrical engineering.  In Europe, where I spent 6 years, there is even a Nuclear Power plant that has operated safely for 40 years now whose pressure vessel is held to its foundation by bolts designed by a chemical engineer (me).

I can't honestly say if this is typical-- but I have always been glad I chose the engineering route.  Good luck!

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Alright guys so I finally decided to stay in Chem eng, due to the fact that I love the subjects and I don't really know if i'm going to like pure chemistry as much. I don't know what Bs C stands for, but just in case, I was doubting between changing from the chem eng degree to the chemistry degree (at the same University, by the way).

I think that choosing the degree for the work you're gonna do is not very intelligent. I mean, jobs change a lot during the curse of the years. I'll stay as I am hahaha

 

Thanks guys!!!

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On 7/6/2020 at 12:05 AM, cogujada said:

I'm here because I have a question (not a doubt ;)

👍 I have no doubt you're getting better.

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