QuantumT

Black Hole Energy Distribution

Recommended Posts

On 1/11/2019 at 6:01 PM, Strange said:

It says: "We're talking about the temperature of the black hole's event horizon" So not inside the black hole.

I have never heard of it.

Anything falling into a black hole will pass the event horizon at the speed of light and quickly reach the centre of the black hole.

On 1/11/2019 at 10:43 PM, MigL said:

Black Holes have a temperature that is based on the fact that they have entropy.
This entropy is proportional to the area of the event horizon
The temperature is then manifested by radiation  ( at the equivalent black body temperature ).

The event horizon is the only external manifestation of Black Holes that we have, and although it is where all the physicality of the BH is manifested, it is not physical at all, but a mathematical construct.

You guys are absolutely right. I am sorry to have appeared stupid. It was a misconception on my side. I saw the matter inside the BH as one thing and the EH as another thing. And I've been very focused on the matter itself in my research.

On 1/12/2019 at 4:09 AM, MigL said:

Are we discussing Black Holes or the German language ?

I was trying to make a point. The point being, that you can understand something almost perfectly (seeing/hearing), but have trouble communicating it (speaking/finding words/symbols).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I found a solution to the BH conundrum. Unfortunately it's not traditional physics. Thus it will probably not get recognized.

My solution is that Black Holes are data deletion points. A way for the universal processor to relieve itself. A simulation shortcut.

Not a shortcut that I invented, or even thought of. I first heard of the idea from theoretical physicist Zohreh Davoudi in the Asimov Memorial Debate 2016.

 

Edit: By this I suggest that both Hawking and Susskind was right.

Edited by QuantumT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, QuantumT said:

My solution is that Black Holes are data deletion points. A way for the universal processor to relieve itself. A simulation shortcut.

Right. I always suspected that God uses Linux and has programmed the universe in C++ (the universe is also object-oriented). As all black holes are connected in hyperspace (as a 5-dimensional array, for us it appears as wormholes), the black holes we observe are in fact all hard links to the single and one /dev/null. However, it might be that some black holes are soft links to /dev/null in other universes. That would explain the multiverse. I think you are on the right track.

Do not learn math. Learn C++.

PS

Linux does endless loops in six seconds

Linus Torvalds

Edited by Eise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Eise said:

has programmed the universe in C++ 

That would explain all the bugs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a new question that fits this thread, so instead of making a new thread, I thought you'd prefer me using this. If I am mistaken, let me know, and I'll make a new,

Here goes:

When a sun is absorbed into a black hole, where does all the heat go?

Could Hawking radiation be that heat escaping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, QuantumT said:

When a sun is absorbed into a black hole, where does all the heat go?

Could Hawking radiation be that heat escaping?

The mass, and all the energy being released from fusion reactions (which ultimately is just the mass in a different form) all contribute to the mass, and hence she of the black hole. 

Interestingly, because the temperature of Hawking radiation is inversely proportional to the size, the black hole will get cooler!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, QuantumT said:

I have a new question that fits this thread, so instead of making a new thread, I thought you'd prefer me using this. If I am mistaken, let me know, and I'll make a new,

Here goes:

When a sun is absorbed into a black hole, where does all the heat go?

Could Hawking radiation be that heat escaping?

Any Sun would not be absorbed into a BH per se. A BH is not an all purpose vacuum cleaner. Any star that approaches a BH would actually start orbiting it, and the stellar matter would be sucked off into an accretion disk, which the spirals into the BH. Accretion disks themselves are orbiting at relativistic speeds and very hot as a result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, beecee said:

Any Sun would not be absorbed into a BH per se. A BH is not an all purpose vacuum cleaner. Any star that approaches a BH would actually start orbiting it, and the stellar matter would be sucked off into an accretion disk, which the spirals into the BH. Accretion disks themselves are orbiting at relativistic speeds and very hot as a result.

Yes, but isn't that relative?
From the EH perspective it probably happens in a jiffy, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, QuantumT said:

Yes, but isn't that relative?
From the EH perspective it probably happens in a jiffy, right?

Not really......

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose it is possible (but probably unlikely) that a star could collide with a black hole head on. I guess that would be pretty quick!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, beecee said:

Not really......

16 minutes ago, Strange said:

I suppose it is possible (but probably unlikely) that a star could collide with a black hole head on. I guess that would be pretty quick!

Thanks for the answers!

A more speculative one: Could a head on hit cause FRB's ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, QuantumT said:

Thanks for the answers!

A more speculative one: Could a head on hit cause FRB's ?

Hmmm, I personally believe that FRB's and GRB's are the last dying breath before a star becomes a BH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, QuantumT said:

A more speculative one: Could a head on hit cause FRB's ?

No idea. I am guessing it would take a supercomputer and hours of simulation to answer that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now