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dordle-loddle

The Big Bang and the Sun

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It wasn't formed during the big bang. It was formed by the collapse of a cloud of gas and dust. (Same as all stars.)

The big bang model does not describe the creation of the universe, it just says that it is expanding and cooling from an early hot, dense state.

Edited by Strange

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1 minute ago, Strange said:

. . .  it just says that it is expanding and cooling from an early hot, dense state.

Would it be more accurate to say "that it is expanding and cooling from an earlier hot, dense state", since we do not know what preceded the initiation of that expansion?

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19 minutes ago, Area54 said:

Would it be more accurate to say "that it is expanding and cooling from an earlier hot, dense state", since we do not know what preceded the initiation of that expansion?

That seems fair.

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1 hour ago, dordle-loddle said:

If energy cannot be created, then how was the sun, Earth's main source of energy, formed during the Big Bang?

In effect the BB was a evolution of space and time [spacetime] as we know them. There was no matter as such. In that first instant the four known forces were combined as one superforce.  As the universe/spacetime expanded, pressures and temperatures started to drop, and the superforce started to decouple, gravity first.

During this decoupling phase transition, false vacuums were created and excesses of energy went into creating our very first fundamental particles, probably quarks and electrons.

The following diagram will help to explain false vacuums during phase transitions....... 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_vacuum

240px-Falsevacuum.svg.pngIn quantum field theory, a false vacuum is a vacuum which exists at a local minimum of energy and is therefore not truly stable. This is in contrast to a true vacuum, which exists at a global minimum and is stable. A false vacuum may be very long-lived, or metastablehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_vacuum     

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::                                    

At 3 minutes post BB the first fundamentals were able to form protons and neutrons as temperatures dropped sufficiently, and the first atomic nuclei were formed.

At around 380,000 years post BB temperatures had dropped to around 3000  K which allowed electrons to couple with the atomic nuclei and our first light element/s were created...hydrogen and some helium.

After a few hundred million years, huge gas clouds of hydrogen had formed and started to undergo gravitational collapse, until at the cores of these gignatic clouds, nuclear fusion was initiated and our first very very big stars with very short lifespans were born, went supernova and disgorged heavier elements into the universe.

These heavier elements  along with hydrogen formed more stars and even planets from similar gravitational collapses.

That is very roughly the story of the universe from near the beginning to today.

Edited by beecee

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