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Kartazion

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About Kartazion

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  • Location
    France
  • Favorite Area of Science
    Quantum Mechanics

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  1. Yes its probability of presence allows it. Because the anharmonicity is focused on the stop of the particle at its ends, unlike, where between two, its acceleration is very fast. You are therefore more likely to find the particle at its ends, than between.
  2. Yes. And as said before this is calculated. I am only emphasizing the result of the very high frequency anharmonic oscillation. In addition this thread talk about of a classical and not quantum oscillator.
  3. As you can see, the particle disappears when it moves too fast. And appears on its extremities because it marks a certain stop. It is an optical illusion known as Optical flow. And that is calculated. Why not have done the approximation? Reminder: When you increase the speed to 20 or 40, you will achieve perfect harmony. --> See the animation So we can see two distinct dots from a single particle.
  4. Here, this time, a code in javascript that simulates the displacement of a particle according to the principle of an anharmonic oscillation. This program tries to be able to measure the duplication of the particle on several given points. When you increase the speed to 40, you will achieve perfect harmony. --> See the animation <html> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width"> <title>Anharmonic Oscillator</title> <style> #contentContainer { width: 200px; height: 600px; overflow: hidden; display: flex; align-items: center; } #particle { width: 20px; height: 20px; background-color: black; border-radius: 50%; } </style> </head> <body> <h3>Anharmonic Oscillator</h3> <p> <input type="button" onClick="stop()" value="stop"> <input type="button" onClick="start()" value="start"> <input type="button" onClick="velocity()" value="speed"> x<span id="_power">0</span><br> <p> Counter: <span id="clock">0</span><br> </p> </p> <div id="contentContainer"> <div id="particle"></div> </div> <script> /*##########################################*/ var unity = 0; var _unity = 0 ; var power = 0; var nb_power = 0; var particle = document.querySelector("#particle"); particle.style.transform = `translate3d(${50}px, ${_unity}px, 0)`; /*##########################################*/ function animate() { unity += 10; document.getElementById("clock").innerHTML = unity; if ( unity <=200 ) { _unity -= 10; particle.style.transform = `translate3d(${50}px, ${_unity}px, 0)`; } if ( unity >= 400) { _unity += 10; particle.style.transform = `translate3d(${50}px, ${_unity}px, 0)`; } if ( unity >= 600) { _unity -= 10; if ( unity == 800 ) { unity = 0; } } if (power == 1) { requestAnimationFrame(animate); } } /*##########################################*/ function stop() { power = 0; nb_power = 0; unity = 0; _unity = 0; document.getElementById("_power").innerHTML = nb_power; document.getElementById("clock").innerHTML = 0; } function start() { if (power == 0) { power = 1; nb_power = 1; document.getElementById("_power").innerHTML = nb_power; animate(); } } function velocity() { if (power == 1) { if (nb_power == 60) { stop(); } else { nb_power += 1 ; document.getElementById("_power").innerHTML = nb_power; animate(); } } } </script> </body> </html>
  5. Really. I always claim the same idea. I am trying to understand what I find. This is why I present it here on this forum to have your opinions. Be impervious to its operation.
  6. Technically speaking, could you develop what you mean? I'm wrong?
  7. And now you are convinced the expected effect? As planned, and at a very very high frequency, I do with a particle, several points of different static mass.
  8. Here is the program in html/css description language of the anharmonic oscillator that I have described. It alternates, and by its entire path, the particle between its two poles. At very high frequency, the conclusion and the aim of this experiment is to clearly demonstrate the duplication of the particle, and this in several places. --> See the animation <html> <head> <link rel="stylesheet" href="oscillator.css"></head> <body> <div id="velocity_1"> </div> #velocity_1 { width: 20px; height: 20px; border-radius: 20px; background: black; position: relative; animation-name: oscillator; animation-duration: 2s; animation-iteration-count: infinite; } @keyframes oscillator { 0% { transform: translateX(0px); } 30% { transform: translateX(0px); } 40% { transform: translateX(500px); } 80% { transform: translateX(500px); } 90% { transform: translateX(0px); } }
  9. ###################################################### We can consider that the oscillator uses an iteration principle. Is the oscillator mathematically expressible as an iterated function?
  10. Oops: How to add text to GIF I find quite a few examples with Python Imaging Library (PIL).
  11. I found this. How to add text to GIF
  12. This is the effect of Kartazion. Here is the first equation: [math]\frac{total\ mass}{number\ of\ positions}=density\ per\ position[/math] This equation is true if the time granted by position is equivalent for each position. It may happen that the particle is stopped longer in one position at the expense of the other. In this case, the equation is no longer valid.
  13. Kartazion

    Latex test

    [math]\frac{total\ mass}{number\ of\ positions}=density\ per\ position[/math]
  14. Yes it is for the start. I started with a harmonic oscillator which goes smoothly in terms of frequency. It then suffices to make this oscillator anharmonic, with a viscosity at the limit switch, and at a higher frequency. If you want I make you the diagram of this anharmonic and faster oscillator. But the result and at very high frequency would be the same. Namely a mass density distributed at the ends. I would have hoped that you would be able to see where I was coming from
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