Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Are Fruits & Vegetables Genderless?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 mansamusa

mansamusa

    Quark

  • Members
  • 24 posts

Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

i have been told that certain fruits and vegetables are male/female is there any truth to this?


  • 0

#2 Moontanman

Moontanman

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 7,878 posts
  • LocationSouth Eastern North Carolina

Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:55 PM

Some are, some are not, most flowering plants, and fruits and vegetable are flowering plants, have both male and female flowers. Sometimes on the same plant and sometimes on separate plants and sometimes the male and female parts are in the same flower...  


Edited by Moontanman, 19 January 2013 - 05:56 PM.

  • 0
Life is the poetry of the Universe
Love is the poetry of life

You do not possess belief, belief possesses you...

I'm always open to new ideas, I just don't let them crawl into my skull and take a dump... 

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, but illusion of knowledge.” — Stephen Hawking

"In every country and in every age the priest has been hostile to liberty; he is always in allegiance to the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection of his own." ~ thomas jefferson

Check out my YouTube channel here.



If I was helpful, let me know by clicking the [+] sign ->

#3 zapatos

zapatos

    Lepton

  • Senior Members
  • 1,724 posts
  • LocationSt. Louis

Posted 19 January 2013 - 03:22 PM

If you are referring to individual fruits (e.g. an apple) and vegetables, then I would say that it does not make sense to categorize them as male or female. Would you categorize an arm as a 'female' if it came from a woman?

 

If you are referring to plants and trees, then yes, as Moontanman said some are male, some are female, some are both.

 

Also note that a plant part that is a result of a fertilized flower (e.g. apple, pea, green bean, etc.) is a fruit.


  • 1
And the Lord spake, saying, "First shalt thou take out the Holy Pin. Then shalt thou count to three, no more, no less. Three shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither count thou two, excepting that thou then proceed to three. Five is right out. Once the number three, being the third number, be reached, then lobbest thou thy Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch towards thy foe, who, being naughty in my sight, shall snuff it. -MP

"As a good christian, I'm always going to disagree with any proof you try to give me." -Peter BE cimp

#4 Enthalpy

Enthalpy

    Primate

  • Senior Members
  • 1,640 posts

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:13 AM

The edible fig tree can be male or female, and its flowers are of three different sexes, depending on the tree's sex.

 

Trees do not grow and reproduce like humans, and are extremely varied, so any transposition would lead to wrong conclusions.

 

Male and female "fruits" are reported to exist on some pepper trees... There, in an agriculture thesis

http://projets.cirad...il-Ethiopie.pdf

but are these really fruits, or rather some edible flower? In pine trees the so-called "fruits" are not fruits.

 

To botanists, apples, pears, quinces... are not fruits but false fruits, as they don't form from the flower.

http://en.wikipedia....iki/False_fruit


  • 0

#5 CirclesAndDots

CirclesAndDots

    Quark

  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 7 March 2013 - 01:03 AM

A fruit, botanically defined, is a matured ovary. So, in this sense, a fruit ( a structure unique to the flowering plants), can be said to be "female". 

 

Flowers consist of sterile (vegetative) and fertile parts. The reproductive assets are male and female, respectively the stamens and the carpels. The stamens---the pollen-bearing parts, collectively called the androecium. (A telling word, translating roughly to "House of Man") . Reciprocally, the carpels---the ovule bearing parts of the flower are collectively referred to as the gynoecium or "house of woman". Of course, there are variations in flower structure, not all are bi-sexual. 

 

 As the previous comments suggested, plants can be bi or uni-sexual. The difficulty in assigning gender arises out of the complexity of  plant life cycles. 

 

Cycas revoluta, a species of gymnosperm, and a common decorative plant in the States (often called Sago Palms), is dioecious.  In other words, There are male sago palms and female sago palms. This is true also of the genus Zamia.  Sexual morphologies aren't as neatly organized in plants as they are in the majority of animal species.

 

http://www.pacsoa.or.../revoluta05.jpg

 

http://upload.wikime...male_cone01.jpg


Edited by CirclesAndDots, 7 March 2013 - 01:08 AM.

  • 1

#6 Moontanman

Moontanman

    Genius

  • Senior Members
  • 7,878 posts
  • LocationSouth Eastern North Carolina

Posted 9 March 2013 - 04:39 AM

A fruit, botanically defined, is a matured ovary. So, in this sense, a fruit ( a structure unique to the flowering plants), can be said to be "female". 

 

Flowers consist of sterile (vegetative) and fertile parts. The reproductive assets are male and female, respectively the stamens and the carpels. The stamens---the pollen-bearing parts, collectively called the androecium. (A telling word, translating roughly to "House of Man") . Reciprocally, the carpels---the ovule bearing parts of the flower are collectively referred to as the gynoecium or "house of woman". Of course, there are variations in flower structure, not all are bi-sexual. 

 

 As the previous comments suggested, plants can be bi or uni-sexual. The difficulty in assigning gender arises out of the complexity of  plant life cycles. 

 

Cycas revoluta, a species of gymnosperm, and a common decorative plant in the States (often called Sago Palms), is dioecious.  In other words, There are male sago palms and female sago palms. This is true also of the genus Zamia.  Sexual morphologies aren't as neatly organized in plants as they are in the majority of animal species.

 

http://www.pacsoa.or.../revoluta05.jpg

 

http://upload.wikime...male_cone01.jpg

 

 

This is not as cut and dried as you suggest, in fact a great many animals have somewhat less than determinant sexuality. Among fish is is quite common for males to become females and for males to switch to females. some change genders simply due to dominance and in some animals both genders are present in one individual.  While what you suggest is true of mammals it is not true of all or even most other animals if you include animals in the scientific sense...    


  • 0
Life is the poetry of the Universe
Love is the poetry of life

You do not possess belief, belief possesses you...

I'm always open to new ideas, I just don't let them crawl into my skull and take a dump... 

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, but illusion of knowledge.” — Stephen Hawking

"In every country and in every age the priest has been hostile to liberty; he is always in allegiance to the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection of his own." ~ thomas jefferson

Check out my YouTube channel here.



If I was helpful, let me know by clicking the [+] sign ->

#7 CirclesAndDots

CirclesAndDots

    Quark

  • Members
  • 14 posts

Posted 14 March 2013 - 01:31 AM

 "Majority" I will concede is a slippery term to use in biology. My original aim was to draw attention to sexual macro-structures. There's a tradition of laymen bias (I lump myself into that category) to assign gender according to gross human characteristics. We scan an organism looking for something penis-like or vagina-esque to determine if said thing is conventionally male or female. Of course sexuality isn't always that familiar, especially in plants and it isn't always fixed, as you mentioned with non-mammalian vertebrates. Indeed,  Hermaphrodites are quite common in nature. 


Edited by CirclesAndDots, 14 March 2013 - 01:33 AM.

  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users